Auto Body Repair

Auto Body Repair I: 1 year - 3 credits

The program is designed to teach the skills of repairing collision damage to motor vehicles as well as minor restoration and refinishing of completed vehicles. Class activities include learning the arts of metal finishing, sheet metal shrinking, welding, plastic filler application, sheet metal alignment, and refinishing. The student will learn how to use welders, air powered grinders, air sanders, polishers, spray guns, and sheet metal pulling devices.

Auto Body Repair II: 1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Auto Body Repair I and instructor's recommendation

The second-year course is designed for the advanced student who wishes to gain additional experience in painting and learn the principles of frame and unibody straightening. A limited number of students will be selected by the instructor based upon interest and ability.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for auto body repair skills learned at the Center.

Specialized Equipment:

 

  • Hand tools
  • Power tools
  • Spray guns
  • Grinders
  • Polishers
  • Hydraulic jacks
  • Oxyacetylene torches
  • MIG welders
  • Downdraft spray booth
  • Frame equipment
  • Sand blasting equipment
  • Frame machine

Occupational Options:

 

  • Automobile body customizer
  • Auto frame repairer
  • Shop estimator
  • Air brush painter
  • Auto body repairer
  • Automotive painter
  • Finished metal repairer
  • Auto body repair helper
  • Automotive painter helper

Skills Taught:

 

  • Metal finishing
  • Grinding
  • Plastic filler application
  • Welding - MIG and Brazing
  • Body panel alignment
  • Body panel replacement
  • Spray painting
  • Buffing and polishing

Contacts

Instructor: Scott Heim
Email: heims@wwcsd.net

Auto Body Syllabus

Instructor: Scott Heim

CIP Number: 47.0603

Course Description

This course is two years in length. The first year Basic Auto Body course consists of beginning skills and theory. The second year Advanced Auto Body course consists of advanced skills and honing of the basic skills of the first year experience.

Basic Auto Body Program

Safety
Theory
Hand & power tools
Metal finishing
Plastic filler
Basic welding
Basic spraying
Priming
Basic painting
Portering skills
Plastic repair

Advanced Auto Body Program

Safety
Advanced theory
Hand & power tools
Additional metal finishing
Additional plastic filler
Panel replacement
MIG welding
Spraying with HVLP guns
Base/clear painting
Spraying catalyzed primers
Fiberglass repair

Equipment Needed

Paint respirator - NIOSH approved
Work clothes and leather shoes
One-inch three-ring binder and a pen or pencil

Course Objectives

Automotive Body Repair Technology I and II is a preparation for entry level employment as a painter's or a bodyman's apprentice.

12 State Segments

Grading Policy

Lab work and attendance = 80%
Quizzes = 20%

Course Text

Motor, Automotive Collision Repair Technology, Second Edition, by Robert Scharff

Note: The syllabus represents content and details of the day high school program. While the afternoon and evening adult technical program follows the same curriculum, some details may vary.

Computer Aided Design-Drafting

Computer Aided Design/Drafting I (CADD):

1 year - 2 credits

Prerequisite: Recommended but not required - Basic Drafting

CADD is a high tech computer approach to drafting that introduces individuals to the planning, preparation and interpretation of architectural and mechanical sketches. Students will be provided extensive experience involving both manual and computer problems. Emphasis will be on learning and applying the functions of the AutoCAD software program. The focus will be developing the student's skills and knowledge essential for employment as a CADD operator. This class meets the computer literacy requirement for graduation.

Computer Aided Design/Drafting II (CADD):

1 year - 2 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from CADD I and instructor's recommendation

The second-year course is designed for the motivated student who wishes to further explore three-dimensional industry-related and cross-curriculum projects involving solid modeling, wire frame/surface construction and pattern development. Emphasis is placed on expanding the student's knowledge and skills involving the AutoCAD software as well as other CADD related programs. This class meets the computer literacy requirement for graduation.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for CADD skills learned at the Center. (See below)

Occupational Options

Architectural Draftsperson
CADD Designer
Technical Illustration
Manufacturing/Tooling
Facilities Layout
Co-op Placement

Technical Drafting Skills

Basic Drafting Fundamentals and Principles
Assembly Drawings
Auxiliary Projection
Detailing
Orthographic Layout
Parametric Modeling
Product Rendering
Sections
Working Drawings
Engineering Layout
Geometric Design and Tolerancing

Architectural Drafting Skills

Exterior Elevations
Interior Elevations
Floor Layouts
Perspective
Plot Plans
Sections
Presentation Drawings
Residential Design

Featured Software

AutoCAD
AutoDesk Inventor
AutoDesk Revit
Rhino
SolidWorks

System Equipment

Dell 330 Desktop Series Workstation

Windows 2000 Professional
1.5 mhz, Pentium 4 Processor
40 GIG Hard Drive
512 RAM
19" Flat Trinitron Monitor

Printing/Scanning Equipment

HP 500PS DesignJet 24" Printer
HP 5000GN Laserjet Printer
HP 5300 Scanner

Contacts

Instructor: Steve Vasiloff
Email: vasiloffs@wwcsd.net

CADD Syllabus

Instructor: Steve Vasiloff

CIP Number: 15.1301

Certifications: Industrial Technology (IX), History (CC), Vocational Endoresment (VT) in Drafting and Design Technlogy

CADD I Overview

The focus of this course is to introduce the students to different fields which involve CADD and the software programs that apply. Mainly the design fields of Architecture and Manufacturing. A portion of the course will focus on Manufacturing Drafting applications. During this unit, the following topics will be covered and the student will be able too successfully complete problems related to those topics.

The following CADD software’s will be introduced . . .AutoCad 2007, AutoDesk Inventor 11, Rhino 3.0 and Revit 9.0

Blueprint Reading
Designed to help students develop the basic skills required for visualizing and interpreting industrial prints.

Geometric Constructions
All traditional drawing and CADD drawing techniques are based on the construction of basic geometric elements.

Grid Drawing
Accurately recreate a hand sketch using the computer.

Orthographic Layout
The required views of an object that provide the shape description of the object.

Sections
A cutaway view of a part that shows the internal features of a part. Full, Half, Removed, Offset,
Broken-out and Revolved

Auxiliary Views
An additional view obtained by a projection on a plane other than the traditional projection planes. Primary and secondary

Dimensioning
Use Conventional and Coordinate dimensioning techniques.

Threads & Fasteners
The principle fastening devices used for assembling component parts.

Pictorials
A 2D representation or the appearance of an object. Isometric and Oblique.

Working Drawings
A drawing or series of drawings that are used as the specifications for manufacturing which normally consists of assembly and detail drawings.

Assembly Drawings
A drawing that shows how different parts are connected with all parts in their functional positions.

Exploded-View Drawings
A drawing that shows all the parts of an assembly and how they fit together.

Wireframe / Surface Creation
A process of creating a 3D model of an object by building a frame and applying a surface to the frame to generate a body.

Solid Modeling
A computer generated 3D model of an object using primitive shapes and applying boolean commands and functions.

Parametric Modeling
A computer generated 3D model where design parameters control the model geometry.

Product Rendering
Photo realistic representation of the object.

Sketching
Freehand sketching is a useful way to organize thoughts and record ideas. Another portion of the course will focus on Architecture problems, specifically residential.

Those topics include the following . . .

Architectural Symbols
Standardized elements on a drawing used to identify fixtures, doors, windows, stairs, partitions, and other common items.

Site Plan
Site plans describe the characteristics of the land and the relationship of all structures to the site.

Floor Plan
A scaled drawing of the outline and partitions of a building as seen if the building were cut horizontally above the floor line.

Elevations
Elevation drawings are orthographic representations of the exterior and interior of a structure.

Wall Construction
These drawings consist of exterior and interior elevations, column and stud layout, and door and window framing techniques.

Sections
Architectural sections are drawings that show details not visible on floor plans or elevations (Foundation, Roof and Wall).

Computer Generated Models
CADD models are used to check the structural stability, orientation, and pictorial appearance of the design.

Model Building
Structural members of a building are shown in a model. These models are used to check structural methods and framing options.

Presentation Layout
Consist of a pictorial drawing that provides a realistic view of a structure, through the use of color, texture, shadows and people.

Automotive Technology

Automotive Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

The program is designed to prepare students for a career in automotive technology. Students learn shop practices, use of tools, shop safety and the use of diagnostic test equipment. Theory and practice are combined to perform basic service in engine repair, engine performance, electrical systems, brake systems, suspension and steering and air conditioning. Selected students will be able to participate in our factory and dealer sponsored AYES Program leading to internships at local dealerships. Aptitude, good attendance and enthusiasm are essential for selection and participation in the AYES Program.

Automotive Technology III:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Automotive Technology I or II or instructor's recommendation
The student will participate in a dealership-like service program in a large, modern shop. The student will perform diagnosis and repair of the power train, fuel systems, electrical systems, cooling systems, and brake systems. All eight areas of automotive certification are covered and emphasis is placed on automotive "on board" computers, fuel injection service, computer wheel alignment and electronic diagnosis. Opportunities are offered for Michigan Mechanic certification. Both Auto II and III are taught by degreed and ASE certified instructors.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for automotive skills learned at the Center.

Specialized Equipment
 

  • Sun equipment
  • Digital Storage Oscilloscopes
  • Air Conditioning Recycler/Recharger
  • VAT-60-40
  • Valve grinders
  • Brake machine center
  • Sioux engine rebuilding equipment
  • Mitchell information system
  • Sun computer wheel balancer
  • Hunter computer wheel alignment rack
  • Hand held computer scan tools - manufacturer specific

Occupational Options
 

  • Auto electric specialist
  • Engine performance specialist
  • Electronic engine control specialist
  • Fuel injection specialist
  • Engine rebuilder
  • Air conditioning specialist
  • Brake specialist
  • Suspension specialist
  • Mechanic's assistant
  • General mechanic
  • Emission specialist
  • Parts service advisor
  • Parts counterperson

Skills Taught
 

  • Troubleshooting
  • Lubrication parts ordering
  • Computerized engine control diagnosis
  • Oscilloscope use
  • Engine rebuilding
  • Air conditioning recycling
  • Air conditioning service
  • Wheel alignment and suspension service
  • Light drivetrain repair
  • Cooling system servicing
  • Electrical system diagnosis

Contacts

Auto Tech I
Mark Batko
734-419-2104
batkom@wwcsd.net

Auto Tech II
Jim Schirmer
734-419-2149
schirmerj@wwcsd.net

ATI Syllabus

Instructor: Mark Batko

CIP Number: 47.0604

Course Number: V0320

Course Credit: 1.5 credits per semester

Course Description

The program is designed to prepare students for a career in automotive technology. Students learn shop practices, use of tools, shop safety, and the use of diagnostic equipment. Theory and practice are combined to perform basic service in engine repair, engine performance, electrical systems, brake systems, suspension and steering, and air conditioning. Selected students will be able to participate in our factory and dealer sponsored AYES Program leading to internships at local dealerships. Aptitude, good attendance and enthusiasm are essential for selection and participation in the AYES Program.
Program Information

The automotive technology course at the William D. Ford Career Technical Center is certified by the National Automotive Teacher Education Foundation (NATEF) in four automotive areas. These areas include Brakes, Steering and Suspension, Electrical, and Engine Performance. First year students will receive instruction on the theory and operation of each of the four areas in the classroom. Classroom instructional methods will include lecture, demonstrations, discussions, video, and internet presentations.

Students will then couple the knowledge learned in the classroom with practical hands on exercises in the automotive lab. These exercises may be performed on simulated automotive trainers, finding and correcting faults placed in shop vehicles by the instructor, or in some cases on the students own vehicle. To complete the hands on tasks, the students have access to some of the latest automotive service tools. These tools include manufacturers scan tools, electrical test equipment, air conditioning recovery and recharging stations, and specialty tools designed to service the various automotive systems.

Course Objectives:
 

  1. To prepare students for employment in the automotive service industry.
  2. To prepare students for the Michigan Mechanics Certification Test.
  3. To introduce desirable attitudes toward work and quality of performance.
  4. To develop safe work habits.
  5. To develop respect for the property of customers and fellow workers.

Course Text and Reference Materials:
 

  • Modern Automotive Technology by James E. Duffy, 2009 edition
    published by Goodheart and Wilcox.
  • AYES online curriculum
  • Manufacturers Manuals
  • Mitchell on Demand Vehicle Service Information System
  • Honda Service and Training Web Site

Attendance Policy

The William D. Ford Career Technical Center places a high priority on attendance because the attendance pattern established by the student in school often sets an attendance pattern for employment. Class attendance is necessary for learning and academic achievement as well as for developing the habits of punctuality, dependability, and self-discipline demanded by business and industry. Regular attendance in the Career Centers labs is essential to allow students to fully participate in class instruction, discussion and skill development. Absences beyond eight days for each semester are considered excessive. Both excused and unexcused absences are counted in the student’s total.

Certificates that may be awarded:

  • Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement. Outstanding certificates are awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4 point scale. Printout of their skills will be attached.
  • Certificate of Completion. Certificates are awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher on a 4 point scale. Printout of their skills will be attached.
  • Students with total points lower than level 2 on a 4 point scale will not receive a certificate, but will receive a printout of their skills.
  • Certificate of Perfect Attendance. Awarded to those with perfect attendance for each semester with special recognition for those with perfect attendance for the entire school year.
    Certificate of Outstanding Attendance. Presented to students maintaining a minimum of 95% attendance for the school year.

Grading Policy

Written homework = 25%
Daily grade = 20%
Quizzes = 10%
Lab / Checklist = 35%
Final test = 10%

Teacher Expectations

Automotive service is a satisfying career, but can be dangerous if safe work practices are not followed. Students should wear clothing and shoes appropriate for the automotive technology program. Safety glasses need to worn by the students whenever they are in the shop to avoid eye injuries. Vehicles driven into the shop must travel slowly to avoid accidents. Failure to follow safe work practices can cause serious injuries.

ATII and III Syllabus

Instructor: Jim Schirmer

CIP Number: 47.0604 PSN: 11633

Course Goals/Objectives

Automotive Technology II and III is a preparation for entry level employment into the automotive service industry and for certification by the State of Michigan in eight automotive areas.

Course Procedures

This course is set up so that students spend 20% of their time in class and 80% in the lab. Students participate in a dealership-type service environment.

Student/Teacher Expectations

Students should demonstrate the attitude, aptitude and skills needed to function in a professional automotive service facility.

Grading Policy

Written homework = 20%

Work habits and attendance = 60%

Quizzes = 20%

Course Text/References

FMC/MLR Auto Curriculum

Automotive Encyclopedia

AYES online curriculum

IML Automotive Curriculum

Tools & Equipment

The class supplies all tools needed for class and lab instruction. Students will need $500-$1,000 worth of tools when beginning employment.

Student Organizations/Competitions
 

  • MITES - Michigan Industrial Technical Educational Society
  • Ford/AAA - Trouble shooting contest
  • SkillsUSA/VICA – Vocational Industrial Clubs of America
  • HSSTP – High School Science/Technology Program (Ford Motor Company)
  • Engineering Ambassadors
  • YAATC – Youth Adult Training Center
  • SAE – Society of Auto Engineers

Course Outline

There are five main topic areas:

Introduction: Driveway service, lube/cooling, tools, equipment, safety
Brakes: Brake Electronics, Hydraulics, disc, drum, diagnosis, anti-lock
Electrical: Battery, starting, charging, accessories
Suspension/Steering: Steering and Suspension Electronics, Steering Systems, Struts, Alignment , Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
Engine Performance: Electronics, Fueling, computerized engine controls, ignitions, emissions

Segment Completion Schedule

Segment  Marking Period
1...............MP 1
2...............MP 4
3...............MP 4
4...............MP 5
5...............MP 5
6...............MP 5
7...............MP 5
8...............MP 2
9...............MP 2
10.............MP 2
11.............MP 3
12.............MP 6

Construction Technology

Construction Technology I (In-School):

1 year - 3 credits

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement! Beginning with safe use of hand and power tools, this course will guide you through most of the steps you need to know to build a house. Learn to read and follow a blueprint, and estimate materials, labor costs, and even profit! All aspects of framing including floors, walls, staircases, and roof systems are covered. You will learn to install drywall, siding, shingles, windows, doors, baseboards, electrical, plumbing, and much more. All the while, you are earning your Algebra II credit with a hands-on approach. Next year, build an entire house in Construction Technology II.

Construction Technology II (Home Construction):

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Construction Technology I (In-School) and instructor's recommendation

In this course, the students construct a residential home. Every day they apply the skills learned in Construction Technology I including rough/finish carpentry, plumbing, heating/cooling, electricity, dry wall, cabinetry, masonry and flooring. All skills applied in this course prepare students for a career in the construction industry and for successful completion of the State of Michigan Residential Contractors Licensing test.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for construction skills learned at the Center. (See below)

Specialized Equipment
 

  • Radial arm saw
  • Table saw
  • Electrical trainer
  • Panel saw
  • Circular saw
  • Electric drill
  • Band saw
  • Transit and builders' levels
  • Router
  • Pneumatic nailer
  • Pneumatic roofing nailer
  • Pneumatic finish nailer
  • Power miter saw

Occupational Options
 

  • Building construction laborer
  • Electrician
  • Plumber
  • Carpenter
  • Cement mason
  • Building construction labor pre-apprentice
  • Mason
  • Construction management

Skills Taught
 

  • Painting
  • Carpentry
  • Electrical
  • Plumbing
  • Masonry
  • Bricklaying
  • Roofing
  • Drywalling
  • Concrete finishing
  • Hand tool use and safety
  • Power tool use and safety
  • Transit level use

Contacts

Michael Koelzer, Instructor
Construction Technology I
koelzerm@wwcsd.net
734-419-2141

Mark Valchine, Instructor
Construction Technology II
valchinem@wwcsd.net
734-419-2141

CTI Syllabus

Instructor: Mike Koelzer

CIP Number: 46.0000

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement! Beginning with safe use of hand and power tools, this course will guide you through most of the steps you need to know to build a house. Learn to read and follow a blueprint, and estimate materials, labor costs, and even profit! All aspects of framing including floors, walls, staircases, and roof systems are covered. You will learn to install drywall, siding, shingles, windows, doors, baseboards, electrical, plumbing, and much more. All the while, you are earning your Algebra II credit with a hands-on approach. Next year, build an entire house in Construction Technology II.

The Construction Technology textbooks are:
1. Basic Principles for Construction by Mark Huth
2. Carpentry by Floyd Voght

Grading

You will earn your grade based on your performance in the following categories: assessments, employability, projects, and classwork. Attendance is critical as project work and employability cannont be measured if you are not here.

Conduct

Construction Trades is a dangerous career. Learn now to conduct yourself in a safe and orderly manner. Fooling around is dangerous. Begin with a safe attitude. It is your responsibility—you make a choice of your behavior.

Eye Protection

Glasses and goggles are provided and you are required to wear them. Make the choice to keep them on.

Dress

Clothing must be safe and appropriate for Construction Technology at the Ford Career Technical Center.

Attendance

You are preparing for a career. The job market demands you report to work each day on time and ready to work. Construction Technology requires the same. Each day you will acquire and integrate new knowledge. To be successful you must be in class and ready to work. You must apply previous knowledge daily. You will be making a commitment to your future. To be successful, you must be here. You lose points, fall behind and miss assignments when absent. Be on time and ready to work. Make it a habit!

Segments

This class covers the following segments in part or full (Construction Technology 2 completes coverage):

  • Safety and Career Awareness
  • Wood and Fasteners
  • Blueprints and Concrete
  • Floor, Wall, and Ceiling Framing
  • Roof Framing
  • Roofing
  • Windows and Doors
  • Siding and Decks
  • Insulation and Wall Finish
  • Interior Finish
  • Stair Framing and Finish
  • Cabinets and Countertops

CTII Syllabus

Instructor: Mark Valchine
CIP Number: 46.0000
Course Number: YR2 V0620
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times: Monday – Friday
7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Prerequisites: Construction Technology I

Phone Number: (734) 419-2141
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127

Email: valchinem@wwcsd.net

Credit

This class meets either the Senior Year Math Related Credit or The Visual, Performing and Applied Arts Credit requirement for graduation. This is a one year class. 1.5 credits per semester.

Textbooks

Title: Carpentry
Residential Construction Academy
Publisher: Thomson Delmar Learning
Required: Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students must purchase: Tool belt, framing hammer, speed square, tape measure, utility knife, chalk line, and work boots

Skills USA - Skills USA is a student-led organization. Students have the option to participate in competitions.
MITES Michigan Industrial Technical Education Society

Course Description

Construction Technology II (On-Site)
Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Construction Technology I (In-School) and/or instructor’s recommendation. This is the real deal. In this program students remodel or build from scratch homes in the Westland community. Students are responsible for every aspect of the construction of this home. The class is structured so the students are on site everyday to develop the skills needed to be effective in any trade associated with construction. Through the course of the school year students are trained as estimators and work in every trade that is used to build or renovate a home. The trades include; rough carpentry, trim carpentry, plumbing, HVAC, electric, dry wall, masonry, cement flat-work, roofing, various types of siding and flooring. After completing this program many students continue their education in construction and take the State of Michigan Residential Contractors Licensing exam. Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

TECH Prep College Information

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan. In order to qualify for college credits at the colleges listed below, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology. In addition, you must be accepted into the college list below and attend Construction Technology for 2 years.

Ferris State University
Henry Ford Community College
Washtenaw Community College (1 credit)
Wayne County Community College (16 credits)
Davenport University

Course Goals & Objectives

Construction Technology II
Segment 1: Safety & Career Awareness

Segment 2: Wood & Fasteners

Segment 3: Blueprints & Concrete

Segment 4: Floor, Wall, and Ceiling Framing

Segment 5: Roof Framing

Segment 6: Roofing

Segment 7: Window & Door Installation

Segment 8: Siding & Decks

Segment 9: Insulation & Wall Finish

Segment 10: Interior Finish

Segment 11: Stair Framing & Finish

Segment 12: Cabinets & Countertops

Criteria for Evaluation

Grading Policy & Grading Framework
1. Homework/Paperwork - 33.3%
2. Employability - 33.3%
3. Performance - 33.3%

Grade Distribution
100%: A+
94-99%: A
90=93%: A -
87-89%: B+
84-86%: B
80-83%: B-
77-79%: C+
74-76%: C
70-73%: C-
67-69%: D+
64-66 %: D
60-63%: D-
0-59%: E

Homework/Paperwork

Homework will be assigned in conjunction with the various stages of construction on the home project. It will be due upon the assigned due date or the student will not be able to join the team on the construction site. If a situation arises that the student does not complete his/her assignment he/she will be required to stay at the Center to complete the assigned homework. There will always be at least a three days notice before the assignment due date.

All homework and paperwork will be graded on a completion scale. Completion is defined as 85% or better. If a student fails to meet the 85% completion standard he/she will have until the next Monday to resubmit the assignment. Assignments can be resubmitted as much as needed.

Employability

Attendance is crucial. No one can learn how to build a home by not showing up. Also the class/building project is based around teamwork and when you’re not present you only hurt the team.

Everyone starts out with an A. After seven absences per semester (excused or not) the students semester grade is reduced one letter grade. After ten absences per semester (excused or not) the students semester grade is reduced two letter grades. After fourteen absences per semester (excused or not) the students’ semester grade is reduced to a D-. After fifteen absences per semester (excused or not) the student receives an E for the semester and can be dropped from the program.

Students are expected to be in class before the class starts 7:15 am and 11:05 am. This is very important especially since we have to take a bus to the site everyday. If the student is later he/she misses the buss. After three (3) tardies the student will have to serve a detention. The detention will be set up with one of the Construction Technology Instructors and be served for no less than one (1) hour.


Performance

Each day is worth one fifth of the student’s weekly grade. This is recorded by the student’s journal, attendance, and Mr. Valchine’s observations. At the end of the week each student will fill out a self assessment rubric. After review of the logs and the weekly assessment the instructor will discuss the weekly grade with student. The total worth or each week is figured the same as homework resulting in 33.3% of the semester grade.

Performance and employability measures all skills. The student must be a team player use proper language, be on time, work steadily and efficiently, respect others and their property etc.

Notes:

  1. Students are expected to call the instructor before class class starts if they are going to be absent. This is professional and helps the instructor prepare for class since there is a lot of teamwork and partnering in the building process.
  2. If is the student’s responsibility to find out what they have missed while absent.
  3. A tardy that is more than thirty (30) minutes is considered an absence.

Certificate of Program Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with less than a “C” average and/or less than 70% of skills at a level 2.To obtain a task sheet you must also have 12 absences or less throughout the year and attend at least 90% of the clinical experience. First year students can qualify for a Certificate of Completion at the end of the first year. Second year students can qualify for a Certificate of Completion or a Certificate of Excellence.

Culinary Arts/Hospitality

Culinary Arts and Hospitality I:

1 year - 3 credits

This program prepares students for occupations in the hospitality industry. Learning includes both classroom and laboratory work. The classroom work is designed to teach basic and advanced techniques and procedures used in commercial food service, as well as CORE information on travel, tourism and lodging industries.

The laboratory work is used to teach the functions of the commercial kitchen, short order cooking and dining room service. The labs are divided into workstations, and each student may choose to specialize in one area after s/he has completed all tasks. The students will operate many pieces of equipment including convection ovens, slicers, fryers and griddles, as well as a touch screen POS dining room system. They will prepare food for the Cafe' Marquette, a public restaurant and The Food Shop, a student restaurant.

Culinary Arts and Hospitality II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Culinary Arts and Hospitality I and instructor's recommendation

Culinary Arts and Hospitality II is a continuation of Culinary Arts I. This course offers the student an opportunity to improve performance objectives, specialize in specific advanced skill areas and gain limited management experience.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for culinary skills learned at the Center.

Specialized Equipment

Rotary bake oven
Convection oven
Deck oven
Food processor
Broiler/griddle/fryer
Pressure fryer/steamer
Slicer
Automatic dish machine
Dutchess dough cutter
Sheeter
Meat grinder
Touch screen
POS restaurant system
Dell Pentium computers

Occupational Options

Foods

  • Cook
  • Short order cook
  • Pantry goods maker
  • Pastry helper
  • Cook helper
  • Waiter/waitress
  • Cashier
  • Dining room attendant
  • Kitchen helper
  • Baker helper
  • Conference service attendant

Lodging

  • Housekeeping
  • Laundry Worker
  • Bellhop
  • Maintenance
  • Desk clerk
  • Reservation clerk
  • Room inspector
  • Travel/Tourism
  • Travel clerk
  • Visitor center informationist

Skills Taught
 

  • Food service safety
  • Sanitation and food born illnesses
  • Tools and equipment utilization
  • Measures and portion control
  • Terminology/ingredient identification
  • Standardized recipes
  • Pantry functions
  • Hot food functions/buffet
  • Bake shop functions
  • Short order cooking
  • Garde manger
  • Ice carving
  • Gourmet/classical/international cookery
  • Advanced cake decorating

Contacts

Instructor: Anthony Paquette
Email: paquettea@wwcsd.net

Culinary Arts Syllabus

Instructor: Anthony Paquette

CIP Number: 12.9999

Course Description

The program is designed to prepare students for occupations in the culinary arts and hospitality industry. Learning includes both classroom and laboratory work. The classroom work is designed to teach the core curriculum as well as basic and advanced techniques used in the hospitality industry. The lab work is used to teach functions of the commercial kitchen, short order cooking, and dining room service.

The labs are divided into work stations and each student rotates from station to station for a period of two to six weeks. Students will prepare food for Café Marquette, a public restaurant, and the Skills Grill, a student restaurant. Students may also participate in SKILLS USA and/or other food competitions.

Certificate of Completion for 70% of tasks 2 or better
Certificate of Excellence for Completion for 80% of tasks 2 or better
Certificate of Community Service Hours
Students completing Culinary Program qualify to take Serve Safe Test through Chef Tony
Participate in Skills USA and Pro Start

Textbooks

Becoming a Restaurant and Foodservice Professional/Year One Second Edition NRA Education Foundation
Becoming a Restaurant and Foodservice Professional/Year Two Second Edition NRA Education Foundation

Evaluation & Grading

Daily Participation - 75%
Quizzes & Tests - 12.5%
Book Work - 12.5%

First-Year Students

The first six weeks of class is in the classroom learning safety and sanitation. Book assignments along with class demonstrations will be performed.

Competencies/Tasks

Level of Competence

Student has been exposed to task = 1
Task accomplished with assistance = 2
Task accomplished to criteria by student on their own = 3

Performing Basic Food Service Tasks

Display personal hygiene habits
Perform sanitation procedures
Perform work safely
Interpret food service vocabulary
Identify ingredients
Weigh/measure ingredients
Identify hand tools
Identify cutting tools
Operate equipment
Interpret a standardized recipe
Clean non-food contact surfaces
Sanitize food contact surfaces
Hand wash kitchen implements
Machine wash dishes
Interpret nutritional information
Receive supplies
Exhibit good work habits

Performing Tasks of Baker Helper

Prepare biscuits
Prepare muffins
Prepare quick breads
Prepare yeast dough products
Prepare sweet yeast dough products
Prepare Danish dough products
Prepare donuts
Prepare puff pastry

Performing Tasks of Pastry Helper

Prepare cookies
Prepare pies, tarts, and flans
Prepare custards and puddings
Prepare and decorate cakes
Prepare cheesecakes
Prepare dessert sauces
Prepare pastries
Prepare classical tortes
Prepare frozen desserts
Prepare souffles
Prepare chocolate and sugar confectioneries

Performing Tasks of Cook Helper

Cut fresh produce
Cut meat
Cut poultry
Pre-prepare fish/shellfish
Bread/batter food
Portion food

Performing Tasks of Pantry Goods Maker

Prepare salad dressing(s)
Prepare salad(s)
Garnish food
Prepare gelatin products
Prepare appetizers
Prepare a "Deli" tray

Performing Tasks of Short-Order Cook

Grill food
Deep fry food
Prepare eggs
Prepare sandwiches

Performing Tasks of Cook

Prepare stock(s)
Prepare soup(s)
Prepare sauce(s)
Roast/bake food
Braise food
Broil food
Saute food
Stew food
Poach food
Steam food
Prepare starchy foods

Performing Tasks of Dining Room Attendant

Supply a service station
Set a standard meal cover
Clear a table
Set up a self-service food line

Performing Tasks of Waiter/Waitress

Seat a guest
Take a guest's order
Place a guest's order
Prepare beverages
Serve a guest's order
Serve dessert
Present the guest check
Handle a guest's order

Performing Tasks of Cashier

Ring up a transaction
Make correct change
Prepare cashier's report
Performing Hospitality Industry Functions
Perform guest/visitor/client services
Perform clerical duties
Perform cash system duties
Perform safety and sanitation duties
Perform informationist duties
Apply telephone skills
Comply with laws and regulations of the hospitality industry
Apply first aid skills needed in the hospitality industry
Develop marketing skills
Apply math to the hospitality industry

Second-Year Students

The second-year student will complete 80% of the above tasks. In addition, with permission of the instructor, a student may choose to specialize in one area.

Competencies/Tasks

Level of Competence:
Student has been exposed to task = 1
Task accomplished with assistance = 2
Task accomplished to criteria by student on their own = 3
Ability to teach or demonstrate the task to others = 4

Safety/Workplace Rules

Safety:

Knives carried and handled in safe position at all times.
No mishandling or wasting of food.
No food or beverage leaves the facility without written permission from one of the instructors.
Do not shortcut a flow of the kitchen by walking through a working area.

Workplace:

Enter and exit the kitchen through doors near locker rooms and bakeshop.
Complete daily activity sheet before you leave each day.
Proper footwear must be worn at all times.
A complete and clean uniform is to be worn daily.

Digital Media Technology

Instructor: Ashley Teffer

V3220 Digital Media Technology

Course Description

In the Digital Media Technology students will investigate the history, technology, and modern day implications of mass media with an emphasis on video production for film, broadcast journalism, and marketing.

Photography

Students will experience working with professional DSLR cameras and gain competencies in Adobe Photoshop CC. Students learn how to set up shoots and create photos for a professional portfolio. This includes necessary retouching, studio lighting, and photography composition utilizing the principles of design.

Video

Students gain experience in pre-production, production and postproduction. Students will experience working with cinema cameras, professional audio equipment, and lighting equipment. Students will also learn how to record video, capture professional audio, build sets, create special effects, producing music for film soundtracks/scores, scout locations, and edit video using Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects. In addition, students acquire the following skills: script writing, storyboarding, and acting for the camera.

V3230 Digital Media Technology II

Course Description

This course is a continuation of Digital Media Technology I, and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on independent study projects facilitated by the instructor. Students focus on compiling finished polished projects for a professional portfolio. Students also have the opportunity to work on district wide media projects and client projects.

Equipment

2014 iMac Computer Lab
DSLR
Cameras
Professional RAW Video Cameras
Professional Audio Equipment
Audio Production Studio
Professional Lighting Equipment
2 Film Studios
Green Screen

Software

Full Adobe Creative Cloud Suite

Contacts

Instructor: Ashley Teffer
Phone: 734-419-2110
Email: TefferA@wwcsd.net

Ashley Teffer is the head of the Digital Media Technology Program at William D. Ford Career Tech Center (Est. August 2014). Previously, Teffer was the chair of the Video Technology & Arts Program at West Bloomfield High School (Est. December 2012). Before working in academia, Teffer worked as a professional journalist and content creator in various mediums of the media industry: television, daily newspapers, monthly magazines, online publications, and corporate marketing. Notable publications have published Teffer’s work, including the Associated Press and the Chicago Tribune. When Teffer is not working she enjoys spending time with her cockapoo puppy, "Seger", ski/snowboard instructing, and long boarding.

 

Degrees

Madonna University Bachelor of Arts, English 2010
Aquinas College Bachelor of Arts, Communications, Minor in Journalism 2007

Certifications

Secondary (grades 6-12)
English (BA)
Journalism (BC)
Interm Occupational Radio & TV Broadcasting 10.0202

Digital Media Course Syllabus

Digital Media Course Syllabus

Instructor: Ashley Teffer
CIP 10.0202 – Radio & TV Broadcasting Cluster (2010 Implement by Fall 2011) Consolidated

Course Number(s)
V3220 Digital Media Technology
V3230 Digital Media Technology II

Office Hours
Shift 1 – 7:25 AM - 10:05 AM Monday – Friday
Shift 2 – 11:10 AM - 1:50 PM Monday – Friday

Course Description

Digital Media I

In Digital Media students will investigate the history, technology, and modern day implications of mass media with an emphasis on video production for film, broadcast journalism, and marketing.

Photography

Students will experience working with professional D-SLR cameras and gain competencies in Adobe Photoshop CC. Students learn how to set up shoots and create photos for a professional portfolio. This includes necessary retouching, studio lighting, and photography composition utilizing the principles of design.

Video

Students gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production. Students will experience working with cinema cameras, professional audio equipment, and lighting equipment. Students will also learn how to record video, capture professional audio, build sets, create special effects, producing music for film soundtracks/scores, scout locations, and edit video using Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects. In addition, students acquire the following skills: script writing, storyboarding, and acting for the camera.

Digital Media II

This course is a continuation of Digital Media Technology I, and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on independent study projects facilitated by the instructor. Students focus on compiling finished polished projects for a professional portfolio. Students also have the opportunity to work on district-wide media projects and client projects.

This class meets either the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT or the VISUAL, PERFORMING OR APPLIED ARTS CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Equipment

2014 iMac Computer Lab
D-SLR Cameras
Professional RAW Video Cameras
Professional Audio Equipment
Audio Production Studio
Professional Lighting Equipment
2 Film Studios
Green Screen

Software

Full Adobe Creative Cloud Suite

State Segments

  1. Mass Media-Media’s Effect on Society
  2. Pre-Production I
  3. Ethics & Legal Responsibility
  4. Production I
  5. Post-Production I
  6. Digital Media
  7. Current and Emerging Technology and Equipment

Equipment

  8. Broadcast Journalism & Communication
  9. Pre-Production II
10. Production II
11. Post-Production II
12. Employability And Career Development

Grading Scale

         100%   =  A+
      94 - 99%   =  A
      90 - 93%   =  A-
      87 - 89%   =  B+
      84 - 86%   =  B
      80 - 83%   =  B-
      77 - 79%   =  C+
      74 - 76%   =  C
      70 - 73%   =  C-
      67 - 69%   =  D+
      64 - 66%   =  D
      60 - 63%   =  D-
        0 - 59%   =   E

Grade Totals

Employability, Attendance, & Work Logs: 35 %
Projects & Handouts: 45 %
Tests & Quizzes: 20 %

Employability, Attendance, & Work Logs

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 10 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property, eating food or drink in the facilities, and being disrespectful to Ms. Teffer. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for notifying the instructor in advance). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Projects & Handouts

Each assignment has a grading rubric and an explanation on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called 
the instructor or parent has called the instructor) he/
she is required to take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Work Habits

It is important for all students to develop a good work ethic. Therefore, students will be evaluated on performance, work habits, jog readiness, job cleanup, proper use of time and classroom behavior. These points will be reflected in the student’s points for the day within their log sheets.

Digital Media students may not bring in other students from another classroom or school unless the instructor grants permission. Cell phones, I-Pods, lasers, portable games, or any other electronic devices are not permitted in the Digital Media facilities. NO FOOD OR DRINK ALLOWED.

Let’s have some fun!
Respect your classmates, the equipment, the facilities, and Ms. Teffer. We are going to create some AMAZING projects this year! Don’t let your attitude, petty drama, or nonsense get in the way! Remember in this room you are part of a TEAM and you must work together. If someone falls, help pick them up! If someone doesn’t understand something, or is confused, give them clarity!

Stay POSITIVE and remember: If you can script it, visualize it, and plan it, we WILL create it!

Student & Parent Contract

Early Childhood/Teacher Education

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I:

1 year - 3 credits

Students enrolled in this program will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience observing, planning and working with pre-school children three days each week in the on-sitechild care pre-school program, called Sunshine and Rainbows. Students will be responsible for completing work on class assignments, lesson planning, observations, notebooks, activity cards, and activity boxes. Each student is assigned a theme and will plan all the lesson plans. All students will go into the community to serve a two to four week internship with children ranging from Pre-K to 4th grade. Students will complete a job portfolio second semester. This class meets either the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT OR the VISUAL, PERFORMING OR APPLIED ARTS CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I
(plus Extended Algebra 2 ):

1 year - 2 credits

Early Childhood/Teacher Education II:

1 year - 3 credits

Recommendation: Successful completion and Certificate from Early Childhood/Teacher Education I and Instructor’s Recommendation

Second year students will gain additional knowledge designed to prepare them for the field of Teaching and other related occupations. They will work more independently on classroom objectives. Each student is assigned a theme and will plan all the lesson plans. Students will be responsible for completing work on class assignments, lesson planning, observations, notebooks, activity boxes and researching various forms of children’s literature. Students will also serve a two to three week internship with children ranging from Pre-K to 6th grade and will update their job portfolios. This class meets either the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT OR the VISUAL, PERFORMING OR APPLIED ARTS CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Early Childhood/Teacher Education II
(plus Extended Algebra 2):

1 year - 2 credits

Specialized Equipment

Child sized furniture
Developmental learning materials for: creativity, intellectual development, social skills, large and fine motor skills, and outdoor play
CD’s, CD players, and iPad
Observation booth
Outdoor play equipment
Full size kitchen and equipment

Occupational Options

Child Care Worker
Teacher’s Aide
Lead Teacher Or Director of a Child Care Center
Child Care Resource and Referral Specialist
Parent Educator
Play Therapist
Early Childhood Teacher
Home Visitor
Receptionist/Public Relations
Child Health/Safety
Time Management
Employability Skills
Child Life Specialist
Pediatric Nurse
Child Psychologist
Physical/Speech Therapist
Children's Librarian
Social Worker
Nutritionist
Elementary School Teacher

Skills Taught

Activity planning/preparation
Group management/guidance techniques
Observation/recording
Team skills/cooperation
Written/verbal communication skills
Nutrition/menu planning

Contacts

Instructor/Director: Tracy Vaughan
Instructor: Tracy Vaughan
Teaching Assistants: Barbara Moore and Gail Kennedy
Email: VaughanT@wwcsd.net
Phone: 734-419-2112

Location

Wayne-Westland Community Schools Educational Complex
36745 Marquette
Westland, MI 48185
Phone: 734-419-2000
Fax: 734-595-2123

Early Childhood/Teacher Education Syllabus

Electronics/Robotics Technology

Electronics Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

This program will introduce and develop electronic technology skills necessary to succeed in this highly technical world. Through extensive hands-on experience, basic concepts will be taught, building a solid foundation of knowledge. Troubleshooting areas are taught in conjunction with the proper use of various test equipment such as the volt ohmmeter, digital multi-meter, signal generator and oscilloscope. Students complete projects and demonstrate their skills and abilities on an ongoing basis throughout the course.

Electronics Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Electronics Technology I and instructor's recommendation

The second year of this program takes students deeper into electronics technology theory through the study of the principles of semiconductor technology. In addition to theory and concepts, students take part in extensive hands-on laboratory projects throughout the course. These laboratory projects simulate real world problems providing students with the optimum foundation of skills necessary to be competitive in today's job market.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for electronic skills learned at the Center. (See below)

Specialized Equipment

Computer assisted AC and DC experimenters
Computer assisted digital experimenter
Computer assisted microprocessor experimenter
AC/DC motor control trainer
Sequential logic pneumatic trainer
Laser and sensor trainers
Communications experimenter
Ladder logic computer assisted trainer
Allen Bradley programmable logic controllers
Pick & Place Robot
Trainer
Dual trace scopes/VOM multimeters
Function generators/digital counters
IBM compatible PCs

Occupational Options

Electronics mechanic apprentice
Customer engineering specialist
Field service engineer
Electronics tester/assembler
Electronic office machine repairer
Electro/mechanical technician
Numerical control technician
Panel wirer
Prototype technician
Computer repair technician
Programmable controller installer/repairer
Fiber optic system installer/repairer

Skills Taught

Binary and decimal number conversions
Identification of major components used in digital circuits
Introduction to programming, microprocessors, interfacing, and communications
Basic AC/DC circuit analysis
PC board layout/wire wrapping
Troubleshooting/problem-solving techniques
Programmable controller installation/repair program
Fiber optic systems installation/repair
Panel wiring
PC use/interface
Ladder logic communication

Contacts

Instructor: Mr. Zachary S. McLean
Classroom Telephone Number: (734) 419-2146
Office Telephone Number: (734) 419-2100

Electronics/Robotics Technology Syllabus

Instructor: Mr. Zachary S. McLean

CIP Number: 15.0403

Classroom Telephone Number: (734) 419-2146
Office Telephone Number: (734) 419-2100

1st Shift: 7:35 am - 10:15 am Monday through Friday
2nd Shift: 11:20 am - 2:00 pm Monday through Friday

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help prepare students for positions in industry. The students will not only learn theory, but must demonstrate practical applications in the lab. The course introduces basic current flow, AC/DC circuits, troubleshooting and problem solving techniques, basic digital circuits, basic computers, robotics, circuit board layout, wiring, and soldering. It is designed to help prepare students for today’s industry and work environment. The addition of the robotics curriculum allows students to build their own robots and the opportunity to compete regionally with other schools. The students will also be introduced to Alternative Energies and their applications.

Evaluation

Lab work, quizzes and exams, projects, attendance, and classroom behavior are used to determine the student’s grade. The grade is based 40% on lab work, 30% on quizzes and exams, and 30% on attendance, participation, behavior, etc. Points are given for each activity as explained below.

Grading

Part 1:

Labs make up about 40% of the student's grade. Points earned for lab activities and projects may be up to a maximum of 50 points each day. (1600 points max per card marking)

Part 2:

Quizzes and exams make up about 30% of the student's overall grade. Each quiz or exam (About 1 per week) will be worth 200 points. (1200 points max per card marking) If absent for an exam, student much take exam on day he/she returns to class.

Part 3:

The daily activity sheet, which includes attendance, makes up about 30% of the student's grade. The student may earn up to 40 points daily. (1200 points max per card marking) If absent all 40 points are lost. Making up work from an absence allows student to earn back 20 points. If parent or adult student calls instructor explaining an excused absence and the work is made up, the full 40 points may be earned back.

Final Grade:

The three parts added together create the final grade.

Grading scale is shown below.
Participation / Attendance -- 1200 points (30%)
Lab projects / Work sheets - 1600 points (40%)
Test / Quizzes --------------- 1200 points (30%)
Total - 4000 points max

3600 - 4000 points = A (90-100%)
3200 - 3599 points = B (80 - 89%)
2800 - 3199 points = C (70 - 79%)
2400 - 2799 points = D (60 -69%)
0 - 2399 points = E (0 -59%)

Attendance Policy

The district attendance policy will be enforced. If you accumulate 15 absences in a given semester, your semester grade will automatically go down to a D-. If you have not completed your assignments you will receive an E and you could be dropped from the class.
After an absence it is your responsibility to find out what class work and information you have missed. You are also expected to call if you are going to be absent.
Three (3) times tardy will result in a detention. Detentions will be served after school in the Electronics classroom assisting the instructor. Failure to serve the detention will be subject to a three day suspension.

Certificates

Certificate of completion with outstanding achievement - Awarded only to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher (4 point scale). Printout of their skills will be attached.
Certificate of completion - Awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher (4 point scale). Printout of their skills will be attached.
Students with total points lower than level 2 (4 point scale) will not receive a certificate, but will receive a printout of their skills.

Electronics/Alternative Energies

Alternative Energy Technology:

1 year - 3 credits

This program of Alternative Energy will introduce and develop the basic skills necessary to succeed in the new “green” and high-tech world of alternative energy. The course encompasses several aspects of solar power. Students will explore the basic concepts of solar power and its applications, with an emphasis on photovoltaic systems. The students will also analyze the modern applications and utilization of wind power, concentrating on the usage of varying sizes of wind turbines for use in urban, rural and industrial areas. Textbook theory is reinforced by many practical application lab projects, culminating in working with solar panels and wind turbines. This course will also explore biomass production, which will include alternative fuels used in electricity generation.

Skills Taught

Identification Of Major Components Used In Digital Circuits
Basic AC/DC Circuit Analysis
PC Board Layout/Wire Wrapping
Troubleshooting/Problem-Solving Techniques
Panel Wiring
Basic House Wiring
Intro to Photovoltaic Installation
Basic Understanding of Bio-Fuels And Bio Mass
Wind Turbine Repair
Maintenance Technician

Specialized Equipment

Computer Assisted AC And DC Experiments
Computer Assisted Digital Experiments
Digital Trainer
Dual Trace Scopes/Vom Multimeters
Function Generators
Wind Turbine Trainer
Solar Panel Trainer

Occupational Options

Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
Customer Engineering Specialist
Electronics Tester/Assembler
Electro/Mechanical Technician
Panel Wirer
Prototype Technician
Solar Panel Installer
Solar Panel Repair and Maintenance Technician
Wind Turbine Repair and Maintenance Technician
Wind Turbine Installer

Contacts

Instructor: Mr. Zachary S. McLean
Classroom Telephone Number: (734) 419-2146
Office Telephone Number: (734) 419-2100

Electronics/Alternative Energies Syllabus

Instructor: Mr. Zachary S. McLean

CIP Number: 15.0403

Classroom Telephone Number: (734) 419-2146
Office Telephone Number: (734) 419-2100

1st Shift: 7:35 am - 10:15 am Monday through Friday
2nd Shift: 11:20 am - 2:00 pm Monday through Friday

Course Description

The goal of this course is to help prepare students for positions in industry. The students will not only learn theory, but must demonstrate practical applications in the lab. The course introduces basic current flow, AC/DC circuits, troubleshooting and problem solving techniques, basic digital circuits, basic computers, robotics, circuit board layout, wiring, and soldering. It is designed to help prepare students for today’s industry and work environment. The addition of the robotics curriculum allows students to build their own robots and the opportunity to compete regionally with other schools. The students will also be introduced to Alternative Energies and their applications.

Evaluation

Lab work, quizzes and exams, projects, attendance, and classroom behavior are used to determine the student’s grade. The grade is based 40% on lab work, 30% on quizzes and exams, and 30% on attendance, participation, behavior, etc. Points are given for each activity as explained below.

Grading

Part 1:

Labs make up about 40% of the student's grade. Points earned for lab activities and projects may be up to a maximum of 50 points each day. (1600 points max per card marking)

Part 2:

Quizzes and exams make up about 30% of the student's overall grade. Each quiz or exam (About 1 per week) will be worth 200 points. (1200 points max per card marking) If absent for an exam, student much take exam on day he/she returns to class.

Part 3:

The daily activity sheet, which includes attendance, makes up about 30% of the student's grade. The student may earn up to 40 points daily. (1200 points max per card marking) If absent all 40 points are lost. Making up work from an absence allows student to earn back 20 points. If parent or adult student calls instructor explaining an excused absence and the work is made up, the full 40 points may be earned back.

Final Grade:

The three parts added together create the final grade.

Grading scale is shown below.
Participation / Attendance -- 1200 points (30%)
Lab projects / Work sheets - 1600 points (40%)
Test / Quizzes --------------- 1200 points (30%)
Total - 4000 points max

3600 - 4000 points = A (90-100%)
3200 - 3599 points = B (80 - 89%)
2800 - 3199 points = C (70 - 79%)
2400 - 2799 points = D (60 -69%)
0 - 2399 points = E (0 -59%)

Attendance Policy

The district attendance policy will be enforced. If you accumulate 15 absences in a given semester, your semester grade will automatically go down to a D-. If you have not completed your assignments you will receive an E and you could be dropped from the class.
After an absence it is your responsibility to find out what class work and information you have missed. You are also expected to call if you are going to be absent.
Three (3) times tardy will result in a detention. Detentions will be served after school in the Electronics classroom assisting the instructor. Failure to serve the detention will be subject to a three day suspension.

Certificates

Certificate of completion with outstanding achievement - Awarded only to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher (4 point scale). Printout of their skills will be attached.
Certificate of completion - Awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher (4 point scale). Printout of their skills will be attached.
Students with total points lower than level 2 (4 point scale) will not receive a certificate, but will receive a printout of their skills.

Emergency Medical Technician

Emergency Medical Technician:

1 year - 2 credits
For seniors - two hour class

Students must be 18 years old within one year of course completion and pass the class with 80% or above to be eligible to take the National EMT written and practical skills exams. Students will be required to complete a minimum of 36 clinical hours which will be scheduled through our center. Some of the skills taught are: CPR, vital signs, AED, control bleeding, childbirth, burns, caring for accident victims. Must have current TB test and the Hepatitis B series vaccination no major health problems and able to lift 100 lbs.

Contacts

Instructor: Kevin Brookshire
Email: BrookshireK@wwcsd.net

Firefighter

Firefighter Training Course

This course will prepare students for attendance in a fire academy. Academic and practical skills will be patterned after the guidelines of the Michigan Firefighter Training Council, giving students a comprehensive preview of academy objectives.

Contacts

Instructor: Kevin Brookshire
Email: BrookshireK@wwcsd.net

Game Design and Programming

Game Design and Programming:

1 year - 3 credits

This course introduces students to computer programming through game design. It is intended for students who want to pursue a career in the information technology field such as: engineering, programming, or consulting. Students focus on planning, programming and testing a variety of games. Example games include: Space Rocks, puzzles, a racing game, and a platform game with multiple levels.

The primary tool used is ActionScript 3 which is the language used by Adobe Flash. Students learn and have direct practice applying programming topics including: functions, arrays, loops, classes, sprites, animation, sound, and game physics. Later course work includes using both Game Maker 8 and Unity3d software.

Each student designs and creates a portfolio to showcase his/her abilities related to the course. Students create software demonstrations, simulations, and tutorials which are all published to a CD for their future use.

Progress from being just a game player to a game designer.

Contacts

Greetings!
My name is JC Irvine and I am the instructor for the Game Design and Programming course.

My school email is: irvinej@wwcsd.net
My school phone is: 734 419-2108

Current students can access our course site here.
Students are asked to use this email: MriGameDesign@gmail.com

Graphic Design

Graphic Design I:

1 year - 3 credits

The Graphic Design class teaches the latest technology for producing print, web, multimedia and display graphics. Students will explore a variety of traditional and digital media. Projects introduce students to typography, digital and traditional illustration, 3D modeling and rendering, digital photography, web page design, multimedia, silkscreen, environmental design and self-promotion.

Graphic Design II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Graphic Design I, C+ grade point average, and instructor's written approval

This course further develops the students' understanding of visual communication. Employment experience, portfolio development and competitions will be stressed. Graphic Design II students will also be able to concentrate studies in specific areas.

Software

Adobe Products
Acrobat 9 Professional
Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe InDesign
Adobe Dreamweaver
Adobe Flash
Adobe Fireworks
Adobe Contribute
Adobe Bridge

Other Software

Macintosh iLife Suite
Microsoft Office Suite
Daz Bryce 3D
ZBrush
Maya
Scanfont
Type Tool II
Cut Studio Vinyl Sign Software

Equipment/Hardware

The Graphic Design lab is a state-of-the-art facility that rivals many post-secondary classrooms.

Equipment that is available for student training includes:

Macintosh Intel work stations
Dell Pentium work stations
Epson large-format printers
HP color laser printer
Xerox Phaser7760 color laser printer
Silk screen rotary printer and Lawson Omega dryer
Heat-transfer equipment
Roland Plotter Cutter

Occupations

Management: Art Director
Producer
Account Representative
Designer: Print, Packaging, Web, Motion Graphics, Signs, and Automotive graphics
Illustrator: Technical, 3D, Character, Comic, Image Manipulation, and Animation
Production: Pre-press, Silk Screen, Heat Transfer, and Sign Making

Skills Taughts

File management
Typography
Color theory
Illustration 2D raster and vector
Illustration/animation 3D
Digital photography basics
Design and layout
Web design/motion graphics
Computer sign making
Silk screen and heat transfer for textiles
Job and interview skills
Portfolio and resume preparation
Cooperative and team skills

Contacts

Steven Paulsen
20+ years experience in the Graphic Design industry.
Clients include: Comerica Bank, Daimler Chrysler, Detroit Opera House,
Sun Micro Systems, Automotive News, and the Detroit Medical Center.
20+ years teaching experience.
BFA in Graphic Design
MA in Art Education
Professional Teaching Certification-Art Education K-12
CTE Certification-Design Technology

William D. Ford Career Technical Center
Graphic Design Department

36455 Marquette
Westland, MI 48185
Phone: 734.419.2101
Fax: 734.595. 2127
Email: paulsens@wwcsd.net

Graphic Design Syllabus

Instructor: Steve Paulsen

CIP Number: 10.0301

Course Description

The Graphic Design Program at the William D. Ford Career -Technical Center is directed toward the development of industry-standard skills in visual communication.

These skills include:

2D/3D Illustration: Students will be introduced to traditional, 2D and 3D illustration techniques. Topics include: traditional media, image manipulation, animation, comic book art, character design, and technical illustration. Emphasis will be on Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and Bryce. ZBrush and Maya will be introduced.

Print design and production: Students will create identity materials, brochures, flyers, CD covers, posters and a variety of other print materials. A strong emphasis will be on Adobe InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator.

Web design, publication and production: Introduction to electronic design and digital imaging for use in developing web sites. Will acquaint students with the use of Adobe Dreamweaver, Flash and Fireworks. Topics include: creating buttons, rollovers, image swaps, and Flash animation. Students will develop an interactive website showcasing their work.

Environmental: display graphics, silk screen and embroidery - Students will create interior and exterior signage, automotive graphics, heat transfers, silk screen and embroidered apparel. This will acquaint the students with computer sign software and hardware as well as the silk screen and embroidery process. Entrepreneurial (small business) opportunities will be discussed.

Student Profile

Students enrolling in the Graphic Design program should enjoy working on the computer and have a genuine interest, in the visual arts.

Graphic Design I: There is no pre-requisite for Graphic Design I, but it is recommended that beginning students have at least one year of art before starting the class. Hand-rendering skills are important, but not required. The first-year program introduces students to a variety of projects.

Assignment topics include:

Typography
Color Theory
Traditional Illustration
2D Digital Illustration
3D Digital Illustration
Digital Photography
Image Manipulation
Design and Layout
Web Design
New Media
Silk Screen, Signage
Self Promotion

Graphic Design II: Students taking Graphic Design II must have completed Graphic Design I with a minimum 2.5 grade-point average and have instructor permission. This class concentrates on competitions, scholarships, portfolios and self promotion. Students will work in areas of their choosing while preparing themselves for a transition to work or post-secondary education. All second year students will have a digital and traditional portfolio upon graduation.

Graphic/Printing Communcations

Printing Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

Printing Technology is a comprehensive program designed to train students in all aspects of the graphics industry. Students will learn basic design, desktop publishing, darkroom techniques, stripping (film assembly), plate making, operation of offset presses, bindery equipment, dye sublimation and screen printing. Students create their own business cards, greeting cards, stationery, flyers, coffee mugs and t-shirts. As training progresses, students will work on real customer printing jobs. In the second semester, students may be eligible for Co-op (learning on the job while being paid). There are many employment opportunities after completing high school. Interested in college? Printing scholarships and articulation (college credits) are available to students who successfully complete one or two years of Printing Technology. Students are highly encouraged to participate in extra curricular activities such as Co-op, SkillsUSA competitions, Michigan Industrial Technology Education Society (MITES) and Gutenberg Awards.

Printing Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Printing Technology I and instructor's recommendation

Advanced students are in charge of running a printing business within the classroom. They work with customers, fill out work orders, produce real printed jobs, learn estimating, inventory, equipment maintenance and basic press repairs. Students will be expected to take a leadership role in the program. Students rotate where needed to complete jobs, but may choose to spend most of their time specializing in one department to advance their skill level for employment. Students are highly encouraged to participate in extra curricular activities such as Co-op, SkillsUSA competitions, Michigan Industrial Technology Education Society (MITES), and Gutenberg Awards.

Specialized Equipment

Pre-Press

Macintosh computers
Scanners
Digital cameras
Acti Horizontal process camera - 24" x 24"
Itek Silvermaster plate camera
Nuarc - Platemaker
Xante' Platemaker
HP Laserjet 8150N printer
Light tables

Register Punch Systems

Stoesser
Heidelberg

Screen Printing

Hopkins 4 color press with baseball hat attachment
EypoLite Screen Exposure

Printing Presses

AB-Dick 9970
Ryobi 3200
Heidelberg QM46
Itek 975 with T-Head
AB-Dick 9810 with T-Head
Itek 3985 2-color

Bindery

Challenge 30" paper cutter
Standard Horizon 30 bin collator with stitcher and folder
Wire stitcher
Challenge drill
Baum table air feed folder
Baum floor folder with right angle attachment
Thermographer
Rosback Perfect Binder
X-Rite shrink wrap

Occupational Options

Pre-Press, Electronic Publisher, Pre-flight, Electronic Stripper
Offset Platemaking/Processor
Offset Duplicator Operator
Offset Press Assistant
Press Operator
Copy Camera Operator
Bindery Worker
Estimator
Equipment Repair Technician
Sales Representative
Front Counter - Customer Representative

Skills Taught

Basic Shop Procedures

Shop safety
Printers measurements and terminology
Copyright ethics and counterfeit laws

Electronic Publishing/Pre-Press

File management on the Macintosh
InDesign and PageMaker

  • Creating/editing documents
  • Creating/editing text and placing images (links)
  • Working with various pallets; ie: tabs, color, links, layers, transform, and pages
  • Pre-flight management and packaging (links and fonts)

Photoshop

  • Color management; ie: converting from RGB, CMYK, bitmap, grayscale
  • Saving documents in different formats
  • Basic editing; ie: eraser tool, paintbrush, clone, crop, fill selecting images

Scanning images
Digital cameras
Printing to laser printer, color sublimation printer, and platemaker

Darkroom

Setting up/shut down chemistry
Operating camera and tray develop litho film

Stripping

Stripping single and two-color unruled masking sheets
Stripping process color (2nd year students only)
Use of screen tints, rubylith and proofing material

Platemaking

Identify/use processing chemicals
Burn, develop, preserve metal plates
Photo direct platemaking (Silver Master camera - paper plates)
Direct computer-to-platemaking (Xante Platemaker3 - mylar plates)

Press

Operate and maintain offset duplicator and offset presses
Print single, two and three color jobs
Print process color (2nd year)
Identify/mix Pantone Matching System
Print various stock sizes and weights; ie: bond, offset opaque, card, and carbonless

Bindery

Power paper cutter
Standard Horizon 16 bin tower collator with stitcher, folder, and trim attachment
Drill
Stitcher - side and saddle stitch
Folder - various folds; single, letter, fan and double parallel
Count paper using paper scale
Perfect binder
Cerlox binder and therm-a-bind process

Management/Supervisor

Inventory, ordering, contacting customers, filling out work-orders, supervising and assisting other students
Estimating, manual/computer assisted

Contacts

Instructor: Shirley Byrd
E-mail: ByrdS@wwcsd.net

Graphic Design/Printing Syllabus

Health Occupations

Health Occupations I:

1 year - 3 credits

This program prepares the male and female student to assist nurses and other medical staff to provide patient care. The student will learn basic anatomy and physiology, patient care, first aid, CPR, medical terminology, employability skills and the concepts of medical ethics. Clinic experience in a nursing home, which is mandatory, will be scheduled during class time. Students will be required to wear a uniform, obtain a physical examination and tuberculin test. Students participate in job shadowing experiences in various allied health occupations.

Health Occupations II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Health Occupations I and instructor's recommendation

This program provides the student who is interested in preparing for a career in nursing, or other patient care areas, a greater opportunity for increasing skills and comfort with patient care. It also provides training in those skills needed as a Treatment Technician or Home Health Aide, Unit Clerk, Veterinary Assistant and Physical Therapy Aide. Hands-on experience in the following areas is provided: orthopedics, labor and delivery, postpartum, newborn nursery, pediatrics and care of preoperative and postoperative patients, as well as geriatric patients. A uniform, physical exam and tuberculin test are required for both classes. Students will participate at local veterinary hospitals practicing veterinary assistant skills. Additionally, students participate in a physical therapy clinical and a Hospital Unit Clerk clinical experience.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for health occupation skills learned at the Center. (See below)

Specialized Equipment

Complete nursing station
Hospital beds
Sphygmomanometers/stethoscopes
Hoyer lift/ambulation aids
Patient care equipment
Resusci-annie and resusci-babe
Hydrocollators, paraffin baths
Whirlpool

Occupational Options

Dietary aide
Physical or occupational therapy aide
Nurses assistant, orderly
Home health aide (advanced)
Veterinary assistant (advanced)
Lab assistant

Skills Taught

Infection control
Careers in health care
Medical terminology
Anatomy and physiology
Safety/Red Cross first aid
Observations and communication
Vital signs
Moving, lifting, positioning patient
Bedmaking
Red Cross community CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)
Rehabilitation techniques
Ethics and legal responsibilities
Isolation techniques
Cleanliness and skin care
Basic nutrition and feeding of patients
Hot and cold treatments
Urinary and bowel elimination
Introduction to hospital ward clerk, CRT
Physical therapy assistant techniques

Contacts

Ms. Ruth Ann Petres, RN
Email: petresr@wwcsd.net
Main Office: 734- 419-2100
Classroom office: 734- 419-2136
Contact hours: 7:20am – 3:00pm
Monday – Friday

Ms. Mary Lou Krause, RN
Email: ledbetterm@wwcsd.net
Classroom office: 734-419-2136
Contact hours: 7:20am – 2:20pm
Monday – Friday

Ms. Jennifer Brunner
Teaching Assistant

Ms. Amanda Miller, RN BS
Classroom office: 734-419-2136
Contact hours: 7:20am – 1:45pm
Monday – Friday

Ms. Rachelle Williams
Teacher Assistant

Mrs. Tana Jorge, LPN
Teaching Assistant
Email: jorget@wwcsd.net
Classroom office: 734- 419-2143
Contact Hours: 7:30am – 1:45pm
Monday - Friday

Monica Kaput
Email: KaputM@wwcsd.net

**Please leave a message on the answering service if you are unable to reach us and we will return your call as soon as possible.

Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration (HVAC)

Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration I:

1 year - 3 credits [hvac]

This program teaches students diagnosis, maintenance, installation and repair of residential and commercial heating and air conditioning systems. Students will learn safety, basic electricity, electronics, refrigeration, air conditioning/ventilation and the use of test equipment in this field for installation and troubleshooting. Students also learn wiring diagrams, controls and tools. Frequent lab work allows students to apply skills learned in class on real equipment. The curriculum also allows students to use electronic, digital and computer controls for managing energy systems found in large office and industrial buildings.

Heating/ Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration I and instructor's recommendation

Students will specialize in solid-state controls on state-of-the-art equipment. They will design, build and install HVAC units. Students will also design and fabricate sheet metal ductwork for their systems in the lab. Students will learn to solder and braze pipe and cut and thread gas pipe. Preparation for E.P.A. license exam is also included.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for CADD skills learned at the Center. (See below)

Specialized Equipment

Forced air/hydronic heating trainer
Refrigeration system trainers
Portable charging and testing units
Compressors and vacuum pumps
Residential air conditioners
Gas, oil, and electric furnaces
Specialized furnace test equipment
Oxyacetylene brazing/welding equipment
Heat pump board trainer
Electronic ignitions trainers

Occupational Options

Oil burner service
Pipe cutter
Furnace installer
Air conditioning installer
Sheet metal worker
Air conditioning window repairer
Refrigeration mechanic
Refrigeration mechanic helper
Air conditioning installer helper
Heating/air conditioning installer

Skills Taught

Basic wiring, schematic identification
Sheet metal fabrication/installation
Heating/cooling fundamentals
Identification and trouble shooting of domestic/commercial heating and cooling systems
Pipe cutting, threading, reaming
Identification/servicing of hot water heating systems
Estimation of heating/cooling leads
Boca codes

Contacts

HVAC Instructor
Ben Abela

HVAC Syllabus

Instructor: Ben Abela

CIP Number: 47.0201

Course Description

The student will train to become a specialist in the air conditioning, refrigeration, and heating career field. Students will learn installation, troubleshooting, repairing and maintaining air conditioning, refrigeration, and heating equipment for residential, commercial, and industrial applications. This is a fully accredited, two-year program for both adult and secondary students. Accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Materials Needed

Modern Refrigeration & Air Conditioning (Author: Althouse & Turnquist)
Six color markers or pencils
Paper, notebook, ruler, compass and #2 pencils (To class each day!)

Course Objectives

Air conditioning, refrigeration, and heating fundamentals
Electrical and electronics fundamentals
Electrical schematics and wiring diagrams
Heating and cooling calculations
EPA standards
Teach students shop and service safety and practice it every day

Assignments
 

  • Student will demonstrate knowledge of the basic refrigeration cycle and components and how they interact to produce the refrigeration effect.
  • Student will identify and use correctly basic refrigeration tool and test equipment.
  • Student will repair and maintain a refrigeration system in the lab, including recovery and recharging of the refrigerant.
  • Student will identify and construct heating and air conditioning electrical circuits in the lab using safety guidelines.
  • Student will install, service and troubleshoot a complete HVAC system in the lab and wear eye protection.
  • Student will learn to measure, cut, thread and install gas lines to equipment in the lab and wear eye protection.
  • Student will learn to measure, cut, swage, braze, solder copper tubing in the lab in preparation to install a unit following safety rules.
  • Student will learn to measure, cut, layout and construct sheet metal fittings and install into duct work on lab units wearing eye and glove ware.

Industrial Salary Range

Entry Level: $7.00 to $15.00 per hour
Journeyman License: $12.00 to $35.00 per hour
Contractors License: $30,000 to $60,000 + per year

Career Opportunities

Appliance service person
Building, hospital or apartment house maintenance
Consultant
Contractor
Estimator
Food service mechanic
Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration service person
Designer

Places of Employment

Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration companies
Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration manufacturers
Aerospace/airlines
Cruise lines
Shipping lines (land, sea and air)
Military

Special Features

College articulation credit is available upon successful completion of this program.
Financial aid is available to eligible students.
Students may also become EPA certified during the program.

Grading

ATTENDANCE: Drop one letter grade for the semester if there are 15 or more absences in that semester
QUIZZES: 30% of final grade
LAB: 40% of final grade
EXAM: 30% of final grade

Media Production

Media Production I:

1 year - 3 credits

Students gain practical knowledge of still photography in 35mm, 120 formats, digital photography, exploring portraiture, commercial photography, photojournalism, photo restoration and emphasis using Adobe Photoshop. Other instruction includes 16mm film, and mini DV video. Students work on documentaries, film production, electronic news gathering (ENG) and animation. Experience in Photoshop, photography or other visual arts is helpful, but not required.

Specialized Equipment

Macintosh computers with specialized editing software
16mm movie cameras
35mm/120mm 4"x 5" cameras
Sound recorders
Portable lighting kits
Electronic strobe kits
Sound mixing boards
Mini DV video cameras
Digital still cameras

Occupational Options

Apprentice photographer
Commercial photographer
Portrait photographer
Photo journalist
Retoucher
Sound technician
Gaffer (Lighting technication)
Grip
Film/Video Editor
Animator
Cinematographer
Restoration
Producer
Director
Electronic news gathering

Skills Taught

Image manipulation / Photoshop
Proper film selection
Loading still/motion picture cameras
Lens care and mounting
Determining proper exposures
Processing of film
Mounting photos
Basic lighting/editing/sound techniques
Scripting/title work
Animation
Special effects
Storyboard presentation
Budgeting
Operating audio visual/video equipment
Portfolio preparation
Treatments

Contacts

Jeffrey Bloomer, Media Production Instructor
Email: BloomerJ@wwcsd.net
Phone: 734-419-2100

Media Production Syllabus

Instructor: Jeff Bloomer

CIP Number: 10.0301

Course Number: V1810

Course Description

Media Production is an elective class that may be taken by high school students. The class is designed to give students “hands-on” experience in digital photography, Adobe Photoshop, filmmaking, video and animation. Various techniques will be introduced and explored, such as: portraiture, commercial, journalism, restoration, documentary, drama, and artistic applications. History and technical aspects will be explored. At the completion of the course students will have created their own portfolio. 

Projects must be completed to receive a grade. Projects done in the first semester cannot be turned in for any assignments in the second semester. Images used in an assignment cannot be reversed, double exposed, enlarged, shrunken, or used within another assignment at a later date. All photos must be mounted if being turned in for a grade unless being turned in at the end of the year for your portfolio. For every day an assignment is late it will be lowered one letter grade per day.

A short 20-25 question quiz will be given for every chapter or section that is covered. A final exam will be given at the end of each semester. Exams must be taken on the scheduled date for your class. If this is not possible, you must notify the instructor before your regularly scheduled date. Arrangements then can be made to take your exam. The weekly quizzes must be taken on quiz day. The only way a quiz can be made up is with a parent’s phone call or a written doctor’s excuse. If a student misses a quiz or exam due to a suspension, the student will not be allowed to make up that particular quiz or exam. A passing grade and a “Certificate of Completion” is required to enter Media Production II.

Equipment

Students are encouraged to use their own equipment if possible. The class will provide all students with cameras and equipment to finish all assignments. Due to the expense of digital photo paper and ink students may be charged a small fee for materials or can purchase their own elsewhere.

Grading

The following is the grading policy for Media Production I. No “+” or “-” grades will be given.
100 - 90 = A
89 - 80 = B
79 - 70 = C
69 - 60 = D
59 and below = E

Assignments: 40%
Quizzes: 35%
Final Exam: 25%
Total: 100%

Suggested Texts

Title: Black and White Photography
Author: Henry Horenstein
Publisher: Little, Brown, Inc.

Title: The Animation Book
Author: Kit Laybourne
Publisher: Crown Publishers

Attendance

All students are expected to be on time and present for all class meetings. You are required to inform the instructor about all absences. Students are required to be present for the final presentation and the final exam.

Homework Policy

Throughout the school year, students will be assigned specific homework duties. These assignments will mainly be shooting and writing assignments.

Work Habits

It is important for all students to develop a good work ethic. Therefore, students will be evaluated on performance, work habits, job readiness, job cleanup, proper use of time, and classroom behavior. These points will be reflected in students overall grade. Media students may not bring in other students from another classroom or school unless the instructor grants permission. Electronic devices are not permitted in the Media Production classroom. Cameras and equipment will be left out when we are working; therefore, no food or drink will be permitted in the classroom at any time.

Medical Assisting

Medical Assisting I:

1 year – 3 credits

Medical Assisting I prepares students to work as a medical assistant within the healthcare field delivery quality patient care. Emphasis is placed on both clinical and administrative skills necessary to perform the role as a medical assistant. Anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, medical math, CPR, first aid,
patient care, medical ethics, teamwork, and employability skills are emphasized throughout this program. Students are required to purchase a uniform. Students will be exposed to many different occupations within healthcare throughout this course.

This class meets the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Medical Assisting II:

1 year – 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Medical Assisting I and instructor’s recommendation

Medical Assisting II prepares students for advance level skills necessary for utilization in a clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, medical ethics, phlebotomy, ECG, patient care, and leadership within their role of the medical team. Strong emphasis on theory throughout this course prepares the advanced student toward a medical program at the college level. Additionally, students may earn articulation credit through various colleges after successful completion of this program. A mandatory, unpaid clinical externship provides the student with hands-on experience within a doctor’s office and/or hospital. Students are required to have a physical exam, tuberculin test, purchase a uniform, and stethoscope prior to entering into the program.

This class meets the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Specialized Equipment

Electrocardiography machine
Sphygmomanometer
Centrifuge
Autoclave
Computers/Windows
Surgical instruments
Needles and syringes
Microscope
Spirometer
Doppler
Transcription Machines

Occupational Options

Medical office administration
Medical assistant
Insurance biller
Phlebotomist
Ward clerk
Medical receptionist/secretary
Medical transcriber
ECG technician
Lab assistant
Pharmacy clerk
Dental receptionist
Dental office aide

Skills Taught

Bookkeeping (pegboard system)
Insurance billing
Medical transcription
Medication administration
Injections
Venapuncture
Routine laboratory tests
Vital signs
Electrocardiogram
Assisting with in-office surgery
Finger puncture
First aid
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Telephone communications
Scheduling appointments
Professional ethics
Taking patient's medical history
Specimen collection

Contacts

Mrs. Elaine Duncan, RN, BSN
Email: duncane@wwcsd.net
Main Office: (734) 419-2100
Classroom Office: (734) 419-2137
Contact hours: 7:20 am – 3:00 pm
Monday – Friday

Mrs. Emily Johnson, MA
Email: johnsone@wwcsd.net
Classroom Office: (734) 419-2137
Contact hours: 7:20 am – 1:45 pm
Monday – Friday

Ms. Amanda Miller, RN BS
Email: MillerA@wwcsd.net

Medical Assisting Syllabus

Instructor: Elaine Duncan, RN, BSN

Course Name: Medical Assisting I & II

CIP Number: 51.0000

Course Number:
YR1 V2710
YR2 V2720

Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times:
Monday – Friday
7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Prerequisites:
Negative TB Skin Test – 2 year program
Physical Exam – 2 year program

Phone Number: (734) 419-2137
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127
Email: duncane@wwcsd.net

Class Web Sites: http://wwcsd.net/groups/duncan_medical for Medical Assisting I
http://moodle.resa.net/ww/login/index.php for Medical Assisting I & II

Academic Biography

Elaine Duncan is a Registered Nurse, Medical Assisting Instructor, Adjunct Instructor at Washtenaw Community College, and HOSA Advisor. She serves on both the School Crisis Committee and Positive Behavior Support Committee. She is a member of Kappa Gamma Pi for Outstanding Academics. Additionally, she is a certified American Heart Association and National First Aid Instructor for Health Care Providers through Wayne County Community College. She has taught Medical Assisting for the Wm. D. Ford Career Technical Center since 2001. Currently she holds an ADN and Liberal Arts Degree from Henry Ford Community College, a BSN from Madonna University, and an Interim of Occupational Education Certificate from Ferris State University. Her nursing background includes Medical, Surgical, Respiratory, and Hospice.

Textbooks and Instructional Materials

Textbooks

Title: The Medical Assistant
Author: Mary Kinn & MaryAnn Woods
Edition: 8th Edition (1999)
ISBN: 0-7216-7299-X
Publisher: Saunders
Required: Yes

Title: Body Structures & Functions
Author: Ann Scott & Elizabeth Fong
Edition: 11th Edition (2008)
ISBN: 978-1-4283-0420-8
Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning
Required: Yes

Title: Intro to Medical Terminology
Author: Ann Ehrlich & Carol Schroeder
ISBN: 1-4018-1137-X (2002)
Publisher: Thomson Delmar Learning
Required: Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students will receive course modules developed by the instructor and will need a 2-inch binder with dividers to organize materials provided during this course.
Students must purchase an approved uniform for clinical experiences.
Second year students must purchase a stethoscope for clinical externships.

Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA)
HOSA is a student-led organization embedded in the course curriculum. Students are required to participate in this program.

Course Description

Medical Assisting I prepares students for entry-level positions as a medical assistant in various health care settings; such as, doctor’s office, medical clinic, urgent care, hospital, chiropractor office, dental office, billing office, etc. Emphasis is placed on both clinical and administrative skills necessary to perform the responsibilities of a medical assistant. Technical skills taught in the classroom are necessary for a clinical setting in order to provide quality patient care. Anatomy of the body, pathophysiology, medical terminology, patient care, and medical math are emphasized throughout this course. Certification in BLS - CPR and National Safety First Aid may be obtained during this course. Students that qualified may take the certification test to become a Certified Medical Assistant with National Competency Center for Testing (NCCT) upon successful completion of this course. Professionalism must be maintained at all times during this class to develop skills necessary to work in health care facilities delivering quality patient care. Throughout the duration of this course, students will be observing various professions within the medical field; such as, medical lab, phlebotomy, nursing assistants, radiology technicians, respiratory therapists, occupational therapist, physical therapists, vet technicians, nursing, and case managers.

Medical Assisting II prepares students at an advance level of skills necessary for utilization in a clinical setting. Anatomy, pathophysiology, medical terminology, medical math, clinical externships, and leadership are emphasized during Medical Assisting II. Clinical rotations are mandatory for Medical Assisting II and completion of clinical rotations is necessary in order to obtain a Certificate of Completion for this course. Certification in BLS – CPR, National Safety First Aid, and ECG can be obtained during this course. Students that qualified may take the certification test to become a Certified Medical Assistant with National Center for Competency Testing upon successful completion of this course. Professionalism is an important aspect to this program and must be adhered to in the clinical area. Students will complete several clinical rotations at various doctor’s offices, Garden City Hospital, and Special Tree Rehabilitation.
Permission by Instructor must be obtained to enter into this program by meeting the requirements; such as, completion of Medical Assisting I, maintaining a C or higher in Medical Assisting I, and absences for the school year cannot exceed 12 days.


TECH Prep College Information

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan. In order to qualify for college credits at the colleges listed below, you must maintain a B average in Medical Assisting. In addition, you must be accepted into the college list below and attend Medical Assisting for 2 years or 1 year in Medical Assisting and 1 year in Health Occupation.

Baker College (1 course)

MED 103 Medical Terminology

Davenport University (60 credits)

BIOL 120 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology - 4 cr
BIOL 131 Introduction to Human Disease - 3 cr
BIOL 211 Microbiology - 3 cr
HINT 110 Health Record Content - 3 cr
HINT 201 Health Information Technology - 3 cr
HINT 221 ICD-9-CM Coding - 4 cr
HINT 222 Procedural CPT/HCPCS Coding - 3 cr
HLTH 100 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - 1 cr
HLTH 101 Introduction to Health Careers - 3 cr
HLTH 110 Medical Terminology - 3 cr
HLTH 113 Stress Management for Life - 3 cr
HLTH 120 Pharmacology - 3 cr
HLTH 127 Healthy Living - 3 cr
HLTH 130 Health Care Law and Ethics - 3 cr
HLTH 131 Alternative Healing - 3 cr
HLTH 203 Death and Dying - 2 cr
HLTH 270 Dimensions of Aging - 3 cr
HSAD 259 Medical Office Application - 3 cr
MEDA 254 Clinical Patient Care - 3 cr
MEDA 255 Clinical Laboratory Procedures - 3 cr
MEDA 261 Phlebotomy Laboratory - 3 cr

Ferris State University

MRIS 102 Completion of Med Term Unit -1 cr
CCHS 102 Completion of Safety Issues - 1 cr
MRIS 102 Medical Term Unit - 1 cr
CCHS 102 Safety Issues Unit - 1 cr

Henry Ford Community College

AH 101 Introduction to Health Careers - 1 cr
HCS 103 Employment Skills for Health Careers - 1 cr

Schoolcraft College (10 credits)

MA 180 Medical Office Clinical Procedures - 4 cr
MA 155 Medical Insurance Billing - 3 cr
MA 134 Medical Insurance Coding - 3 cr

Washtenaw Community College (1 credit)

Health Care Terminology - 1 cr

Wayne County Community College (16 credits)

EMT 101 First Aid - 2 cr
CRE 100 Career Education - 3 cr
OTA 110 Terminology and Professional Communications - 2 cr

Course Goals and Objectives

Medical Assisting: 51.0000 – Therapeutic Services

Segment 1:

Academic Foundations – Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Math

Segment 2:

Medical Terminology

Segment 3:

Communications – Understanding the communication process and diversity of patients.

Segment 4:

Team Work - Understanding that ability to work as a team member in healthcare.

Segment 5:

Safety (Ferris State Curriculum)

  • General Safety in Health Care
  • Infection Control
  • Blood Borne Pathogens
  • Ergonomics
  • Fire Safety
  • Disaster Preparedness and Disaster Communications
  • Hazmat
  • Standard 7
  • TB Precautions, MRSA, and VRE precautions
  • OSHA Requirements

Segment 6:

Knowledge of Health Care Systems, Health Care Insurance, Current Technologies, Epidemiology and Emerging Diseases.

Segment 7:

Understanding Legal Responsibilities, including Medical Law, and HIPPA laws. Understanding Ethical Issues within the Health Care System.

Segment 8:

Technical Skills

  • CPR
  • First Aid
  • Vital Signs

Segment 9:

Health Maintenance Practices

  • Stress and Anger Management Techniques
  • Conflict Resolution Methods
  • Character Education

Segment 10:

Developing positive Employability Skills for success within the workplace:

  • Professionalism
  • Attendance
  • Leadership
  • Character Education awareness

Segment 11:

Information Technology

Segment 12:

Participate in Work-based Learning

  • Clinical tours for observation of Health Care Profession
  • Clinical Rotations for second year students
  • Job Shadowing

Criteria for Evaluation

Student Conduct

Professionalism is required within this program. Student conduct should demonstrate professionalism in the classroom as well as the clinical site. No foul language will be tolerated in either place. It is the student’s responsibility to come to class prepared with their materials for the day.

Thefts of books, equipment, or other student belongings, and any abuse of equipment will result in suspension and/or removal from the program.

All students entering into a medical program must sign a document stating that no felony charges are in your history as a minor. This is a state mandate for all health career programs. Documentation will accompany this syllabus upon entering into the Medical Assisting Program.

Second Year Student Requirement

All students requesting to return as a second year student is at the discretion of the instructor. In order to qualify to return as a second year student:

  • You must maintain a grade C or higher
  • Attendance is mandatory. Any student with 12 absences for the year will not be allowed to return as a second year student. This will be strictly enforced.
  • The ability to perform clinical skills taught in class in mandatory. Refusal to perform a skill or cheating will terminate the possibility of returning as a second year student. Second year students work independently and must be able to perform the skills necessary to work in a clinical setting.

Attendance Policy

The Wayne-Westland Community School District’s attendance policy will be enforced. In addition, if you accumulate more than 12 absences in a given semester, your grade will automatically drop to a D-. Once you obtained an E in this class with 12 absences, you will be dropped from this class.

It is the responsibility of the student to find out what assignments he/she has missed and make arrangements to make up the work. Any module or typing assignment due on the day of the absence can only be turned in the day the student returns to class if the student has called in to the Medical Assisting Office and reported his/her absence for the day. No late modules will be accepted. Absence on the day of a test can be made up after school.
Students should arrive to class on time and prepared for the day. Tardiness will result in an after-school detention. Anyone tardy more than 30 minutes will be considered absent for the day.

Tardies:

3 Tardies: 1 hour Detention
6 Tardies: 2 hour Detention
9 Tardies: Referral for Suspension

Evaluation Criteria:

Weighted Grading Scale:
Test and quizzes – 30%
Skills and Clinical – 40%
Employability & Attendance – 20%
Modules and Typing assignments – 10%

Grading System:

90 – 100 – A
80 – 89 - B
70 – 79 - C
60 – 69 - D
59 and below – E

Employability & Attendance Grade

Days Absent                           Employ. Grade
Zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20%       A
3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15%       B
4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10%       C
5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5          D
6 or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1%          E

Clinical

You are expected to attend all clinical experiences scheduled for the class. If you are absent for more than one clinical in a given marking period your grade will be lowered. It is impossible to receive a passing grade in the class and not participate in clinical. Failure to be appropriately dressed for clinical will result in a 0 for day and student will be unable to attend the clinical.

Furthermore, clinical experiences are a privilege for students to attend. Any student that has excessive absences (more than 6 per semester), rude or unprofessional behavior in class, and poor performance (D or failing) will not be allowed to attend any clinical rotation. This will be strictly enforced.

Any time we are having a clinical experience in the room or at a clinical site, you are expected to come to class prepared:

  • Hair up and off collar – no inappropriate hair color (blue, pink, etc.)
  • Short nails and no nail polish. This is a safety & health hazard and will not be permitted.
  • No jewelry - no bracelets (gold, plastic, or string), rings, necklaces, eyebrow, nose piercing, and tongue rings. This is strictly enforced. You may wear only 1 pair of stud earrings and a watch with your uniform.
  • No perfume, cologne or strong smelling hand lotion.
  • Must have white socks and white leather shoes (no canvas shoes).
  • Name tag must be worn at all times at clinical sites. Failure to provide a name tag for a clinical site will result in failure to attend a clinical site. This student will receive a 0 for the day.
  • Approved scrub uniform is required to practice skills, participate in labs, and for Clinical Tours.

Scrub sets should be clean and unwrinkled (not just pulled out of a bag and put on over other clothing!). Uniforms should not be worn to school when attending a clinical site. It is your responsibility to purchase and wear appropriate foot wear and under garments. If you are dressed unprofessional you will not only lose activity points, but you will also not be allowed to attend the clinical site.

Clinical for Second Year Students

You are expected to attend all clinical experiences scheduled for this class. Clinical is mandatory for this class. Failure to attend clinical rotations can result in an E for the card marking for clinical and failure to receive a Certificate of Completion. Failure to receive a Certificate of Completion means you are in jeopardy of passing this class and receiving the 3 credits, and you will not complete this course or receive a Certificate of Completion. If the student is dropped from clinical due to attendance or behavioral problems, the student will fall into the category of failure to attend clinical rotations.

Clinical experience is an important aspect to this Medical Assisting II class and participation is required. It is the responsibility of the student to secure a private clinical position. Failure to obtain a private clinical site can result in termination of class at end of the first semester.
It is the responsibility of the student to obtain a TB test and physical for clinical. Students will not be allowed on clinical sites without this documentation. .

It is your responsibility to arrive to class in proper dress attire for clinical. It is your responsibility to have proper ID for clinical at all times. Failure to do so will result in failure to attend clinical.

Attendance is extremely important and will be strictly enforced. More than 2 absences from your private clinical, 1 absence from Garden City Hospital and 1 absence from Special Tree Rehab will terminate you from clinical and will result in a failing grade for the card marking. Absences with documentation from a doctor’s office/hospital on appropriate letterhead and special situations will be taken into consideration at the discretion of the instructor. When unable to attend clinical, it is the responsibility of the student to contact their private clinical site to inform them of the absence and to contact the clinical instructor or Mrs. Duncan.
Attitude and behavior is an important part of clinical. Second year students should be professional at all times while on clinical site.

Lab/Clinical Skills

Students will receive a ‘Competency Grade’ on each skill taught in the class. It is the responsibility of the student to practice the skill taught to obtain a passing grade. Students will be tested and checked off on their skill once. For every day late on testing, the skill grade will be dropped by 10%.

Levels are as follows:

4 – student is competent to teach/demonstrate to others the task (95%)
3 – student can perform the task without assistance (85%)
2 – student can perform the task with minimal assistance (75%)
1 – student practiced but did not test off on the task taught (40%)

Certificates

Upon meeting the criteria, students may earn several certificates for the Medical Assisting Program:

  • Certificate of Completion
  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • BLS – CPR
  • First Aid
  • ECG
  • State Exam

Students completing the program may sit for the exam to become a Certified Medical Assistant through National Center for Competency Testing.


Certificate of Program Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with less than a “C” average and/or less than 70% of skills at a level 2.

To obtain a task sheet you must also have 12 absences or less throughout the year and attend at least 90% of the clinical experience. First year students can qualify for a Certificate of Completion at the end of the first year. Second year students can qualify for a Certificate of Completion or a Certificate of Excellence.

Please keep these guidelines in mind if you are contemplating not completing a particular section (i.e. blood studies, blood drawing, urine studies, etc.) or not attending a clinical experience.

I have read the Syllabus and understand all the Medical Assisting rules for the classroom and clinical experience. I will agree to abide by the requirements for this program.

I agree to purchase the uniform specified by the program for my student.

Should you have any questions regarding expectations for this program, please call Mrs. Duncan at (734) 419-2137.

Welding Technology

Welding Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits [welding]

The program is designed to prepare students for entry-level welding occupations. Students learn basic and advanced techniques in oxyacetylene, gas metal arc, shielded metal arc, and gas tungsten arc welding processes. Students also use basic math and measurement skills to assist them in the building and repair of many things. Brazing, oxyacetylene cutting and blueprint reading are included in this program. The first-year student may also be involved in welding competitions against other schools.

Welding Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Welding Technology I and instructor's recommendation

The second-year student is expected to take a leadership role among his/her peers while improving/completing objectives on all equipment. Students are involved in welding competitions against students from other schools. These competitions may lead to college credits, awards, prizes, certificates and/or employment. The second-year student will weld in all positions, while fabricating projects and repairing an assortment of equipment. Students will learn to program and operate a welding robot.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for welding skills learned at the Center. (See below)

Specialized Equipment

AC/DC arc welders
MIG welders
TIG welders
Pipe beveler
Brazing equipment
Iron crafter
Grinders
Band saws
Shears
Plasma cutting system
Drill press
Eye Burner
Robot welding booth

Occupational Options

Combination welder
Production welder
Gas welder
Arc welder
Fabricator
Welder/fitter
Layout/welder
Mechanic/welder
Welding engineer

Skills Taught

Arc welding
Gas welding
MIG welding
TIG welding
Shop welding
Shop safety
Brazing and cutting
Backhand welding
Blueprint reading
Fabrication

Contacts

Mr. Regets may be contacted by e-mail at regets@wwcsd.net or by phone at 734-419-2127

Welding Technology Syllabus

Instructor
Mr. Nicholas Regets            

Office Phone
734-419-2127

School Class Hours
First Shift 7:25-10:05 AM
Second Shift  11:10-1:50 PM

Welding Technology

This class offers a unique opportunity for students to receive credit for math by enrolling in either a senior math or a algebra II math section. The math section is imbedded into the welding curriculum as a regular part of the welding class. Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit is available as well. This class is taught in the hopes of mastering the technical, academic and social skills needed for entry level employment or continued education in the welding industry.  

CIP – 48.0508PSN# 19063
Course # V2110-1, #V2110EM-1 Embedded Math, V2120-1.

First Year Student Segments/Units of study

Occupational Orientation
Safety and Health in Welding
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
Manual Oxyacetylene fuel Gas Cutting
Mechanized Oxyacetylene fuel Gas Cutting
Gas Metal Arc Welding
Drawing and Welding Symbols
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
Flux Cored Arc Welding
Plasma Arc Cutting
Air Carbon Arc Cutting
Welding Inspection and Testing

Course Description

Welding I students will study and practice basic welding principles involving shielded metal arc welding, oxyacetylene welding and either tungsten inert gas or gas metal arc welding in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions. Occupational opportunities are covered as well as safety and health awareness. Employability skills needed for success in the welding industry will be taught and students will visit manufacturing environments to experience what takes place in the business world. Basic units of measurement will be covered and students will be introduced to blueprint reading. Students will enjoy field trips to Community colleges to explore options for advanced learning and will be involved in welding competitions against other schools and each other. This course will serve as an introduction to the welding field and additional course work will be necessary for students to become more proficient in preparation for entry level welding in industry.       

Prerequisites

There are no requirements to enter the welding one class other than a desire to learn and a commitment to give your best consistent effort each day. First year seniors or juniors are welcomed.

Established Course Outcomes

The Welding I student will:

Learn safe set up and operation of Oxyacetylene equipment.
Satisfactorily perform Oxyacetylene welds in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions.
Satisfactorily perform Shielded Metal arc welds in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions.
Satisfactorily perform either Tungsten Inert Gas Welding or Metal Inert Gas Welding in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions.
Understand basic safety and health procedures along with work attitudes that may be expected in an industrial work setting.
Learn basic joint designs, related welding terminology, and be introduced to blueprints.
Have an understanding of the welding industry in order to make career choices.
Practice proper units of measurement with the basic rule and tape.
Participate in field trips to manufacturing facilities and Colleges
Participate in a competition for welding at Washtenaw Community College
Learn and operate various basic shop equipment that may be encountered in the welding industry

The Welding II student will:

Satisfactorily perform Shielded Metal Arc, Gas Metal Arc, and Gas Tungsten Arc welds in all positions on 1/8 to ¼ inch thick metal
Satisfactorily weld on the Vee Groove welds in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions on 3/8 inch metal.
Perform successful operation of the Air Carbon Arc process
Successfully perform Flux Cored Arc Welding in the flat position
Successfully operate the various shop equipment safely and efficiently.
Perform successful operation of the oxyacetylene line burning equipment.
Perform successful operation of the plasma cutting torch.
Perform basic inspection and testing of some of the welds
Be involved in student competitions and field trips to colleges and universities
There are welding activities that advanced students are involved with to enhance their experience in the class; e.g., Lincoln Projects, welding repairs, customer work, etc.

Welding Credit Issued

1 1/2 elective welding credit per semester unless student is enrolled in a specific Math/Welding or visual arts section, then the welding credit would be 1 and the Math or visual arts credit would be ½.

Senior Math Credit Issued

1/2 credit per semester

Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit

1/2 credit per semester

Algebra II Credit Issued

1/2 credit per semester

Textbook and Materials Used

Welding Skills by B.J.Moniz and R.T. Miller
Basic Blueprint Reading Skills by C.Thomas Olivo, Albert V. Pqyne, Thomas P. Olivo
Various handouts and videos covering welding related topics  

Welding Equipment needed for participation in the Welding Program   

All students unable to obtain the safety clothes or equipment should contact Mr. Regets so arrangements can be made for that student to receive help in obtaining the equipment to make sure that the student may participate in the welding class.

  1. Fire stop or fire retardant jacket/with or without leather sleeves (leather sleeves are better and preferred).
  2. Steel toed welding boots
  3. Vise grips for quenching hot metal, larger ones hold up better. Two pairs are preferred as they wear out throughout the year.
  4. Tape measure with metric/standard measurement units.
  5. Three pairs of welding gloves / they need to be replaced throughout the year.
  6. Safety Glasses / One pair are provided but they do get scratched and worn out. Look for the stamp Z-87 on the glasses if you purchase your own. These are required Occupational Safety and Health Administration approved glasses. No dark shades are permitted.
  7. OAW Welding and cutting goggles/shade #5

Total costs can vary depending on where the safety equipment and clothes are purchased. Students will receive an equipment list with this syllabus so parents can begin planning how to obtain needed equipment.

Evaluation and Grading of Tests, Quizzes, and Projects      

Various written assignments on every unit will be worth 20% of the card marking grade including any math work. Students will have a daily activity grade that makes up 40% of the card marking grade which is subjective to instructor assessments on behavior, attitude, safety, performance, clean up and punctuality. A hands-on welding final will be given that is worth 20% of the card marking grade. The remaining 20% of the grade will be from Unit tests. So, daily grades including welding tasks, written work, written tests, and the welding final will total 100% of the final grade. Extra credit may be awarded if students are involved in one or more of the various extra activities that are made available to all students who wish to participate.

Grading Scale and Policy

A = 93.3 - 100
A- = 90 - 93.2
B+ = 86.6 - 89.9
B = 83.3 - 86.5
B- = 80 - 83.2
C+ = 76.6 - 79.9
C = 73.3 - 76.5
C- = 70 - 73.2
D+ = 66.6 - 69.9
D = 63.3 - 66.5
D- = 60 - 63.2
E = 0-59.9

Attendance, attitude, social behavior, work ethic and available extra credit assignments will determine whether a borderline grade will be raised or lowered. Students are expected to carry themselves professionally while treating each other respectfully. Social, academic and technical skills are all taught in the class to further prepare students for advancement into college, or entry level work in the welding industry.

Work-Based Learning (Course Requirement)

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Program Attendance Policy

Students must attend class regularly in order to receive credit or be considered for employment and competitive opportunities. If a student needs to be absent due to illness or an emergency situation, including court, funerals etc, she (he) should contact the office and bring in documentation for all absences. The main office will determine whether an absence is unexcused, excused, documented or undocumented.  All make-up work is required to be done within the first week of an absence. A student loses credit for the class when they exceed the 15 days absence limit unless they make arrangements to make up all hours missed over the 15 days and complete course requirements per instructor expectations.  Make up time and assignments must be arranged with the instructor.  NO credit will be given unless this requirement is met.  Remember! We are training students in preparation for entry level employment, all employers expect excellent attendance and great attitudes, please help support us in these important areas!

Students must receive permission from the instructor for all school related functions, co-op working arrangements, field trips, competitions and any class sponsored experiences. 

Certificates that may be awarded

Certificate of completion to students who complete one full year in the program with at least 70% of welding competencies at a level of 2 or higher on a 4 point scale.

Certificate of completion with outstanding achievement to students completing one full year in the welding program with at least 80% of welding competencies at a level 3 or higher on a 4 point scale.

Thank you very much for any support you provide for your son or daughter! I will do my best to help you in preparing your son/daughter for a successful school year and life.

Mr. Regets may be contacted by e-mail at regets@wwcsd.net or phone at 734-419-2127

Welding Technology Two Syllabus

Instructor
Mr. Nicholas Regets             

Office Phone
734-419-2127

School Class Hours
First Shift 7:25-10:05 AM
Second Shift  11:10-1:50 PM

Welding Technology Two

This class offers a unique opportunity for students to receive credit for math by enrolling in either a senior math or a algebra II math section. The math section is imbedded into the welding curriculum as a regular part of the welding class. Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit is available as well. This class is taught in the hopes of mastering the technical, academic and social skills needed for entry level employment or continued education in the welding industry.  

CIP – 48.0508PSN# 19063

Course # V2110-2, #V2110EM-2 Embedded Math, V2120-2.

Second Year Student Segments/Units of study

Occupational Orientation
Safety and Health in Welding
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
Manual Oxyacetylene fuel Gas Cutting
Mechanized Oxyacetylene fuel Gas Cutting
Gas Metal Arc Welding
Drawing and Welding Symbols
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
Flux Cored Arc Welding
Plasma Arc Cutting
Air Carbon Arc Cutting
Welding Inspection and Testing

Second Year Student Q Segments/Application

Fabrication Project/Report
Welding Inspection/Die Penetrant Project
Flux Cored Welding Application
Plasma Cutting Application/Non Ferrous Metal
Arc Gouging Applications
Advanced Gas Tungsten Welding Applications/Nonferrous Metal
Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding Applications
Advanced Gas Metal Arc Welding Applications
Art Design Fabrication Project
Certification/Testing Applications

Course Description

Welding II students will build on the fundamental skills learned in Welding I by continuing their welding training on all welding processes in the horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Advanced applications include certification testing, plasma cutting nonferrous metal, arc gouge cutting, art fabrication, welding project fabrication, welding inspection, flux core welding and customer project repair. Second year students will take on more responsibility as leaders through team work, mentoring, foreman positions, fabrication projects and welding repair work. Second year students will have increased opportunities to be involved in competitions that may lead to employment, scholarships, awards and prizes. The overall focus for the second year student is to prepare for entry level employment in the welding industry and/or advanced studies in a postsecondary college program. Second year students also participate in leading activities in open house, high school welding tryouts, middle school tours etc. A highly motivated student will be in great position for his/her next career step when leaving this class.      

Prerequisites

The only requirement to enter the welding two class is to pass welding one and have the desire to continue to learn and be committed to give a consistent effort each day.

Established Course Outcomes

The Welding II student will:

Learn how to operate and cut non-ferrous metal in various shapes successfully with a Plasma torch.
Satisfactorily perform cutting operations with a Carbon arc graphite electrode.
Satisfactorily perform Shielded Metal arc welds in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions including practicing certification welding.
Satisfactorily perform Tungsten Inert Gas Welding in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions.
Satisfactorily perform Gas Metal Arc Metal welding in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions.
Develop a welding fabrication project including the design, fabrication, and welding. A written report that includes detailed drawings, pictures, procedures, safety steps, introduction and conclusion will also be required.
Develop an Art project including the designing, drawing, fabricating and welding of the project.
Have an advanced understanding of the welding industry in order to make career choices.
Participate in work based/field trips to manufacturing facilities and Colleges.
Participate in competitions for welding at various colleges and business locations.
Learn and operate various basic shop equipment that may be encountered in the welding industry
Satisfactorily perform Flux Cored welds in the Flat and horizontal positions.
Learn to identify welding defects by incorporating inspection techniques used on weldments including using dye penetrant testing and bend testing.
Participate in class activities that will allow them to learn leadership behaviors.

Welding Credit Issued

1 1/2 elective welding credit per semester unless student is enrolled in a specific Math/Welding or visual arts section, then the welding credit would be 1 and the Math or visual arts credit would be ½.

Senior Math Credit Issued

1/2 credit per semester

Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit

1/2 credit per semester

Algebra II Credit Issued

1/2 credit per semester

Textbook and Materials Used

Welding Skills by B.J.Moniz and R.T. Miller
Basic Blueprint Reading Skills by C.Thomas Olivo, Albert V. Pqyne, Thomas P. Olivo
Various handouts and videos covering welding related topics     

Welding Equipment needed for participation in the Welding Program

All students unable to obtain the safety clothes or equipment should contact Mr. Regets so arrangements can be made for that student to receive help in obtaining the equipment to make sure that the student may participate in the welding class.

Fire stop or fire retardant jacket/with or without leather sleeves (leather sleeves are better and preferred).
Steel toed welding boots
Vise grips for quenching hot metal, larger ones hold up better. Two pairs are preferred as they wear out throughout the year.
Tape measure with metric/standard measurement units.
Three pairs of welding gloves / they need to be replaced throughout the year.
Safety Glasses / One pair are provided but they do get scratched and worn out. Look for the stamp Z-87 on the glasses if you purchase your own. These are required Occupational Safety and Health Administration approved glasses. No dark shades are permitted.
OAW Welding and cutting goggles/shade #5

Total costs can vary depending on where the safety equipment and clothes are purchased. Students will receive an equipment list with this syllabus so parents can begin planning how to obtain needed equipment.

Evaluation and Grading of Tests, Quizzes, and Projects      

Various written assignments on every unit will be worth 20% of the card marking grade including any math work. Students will have a daily activity grade that makes up 40% of the card marking grade which is subjective to instructor assessments on behavior, attitude, safety, performance, clean up and punctuality. A hands-on welding final will be given that is worth 20% of the card marking grade. The remaining 20% of the grade will be from Unit tests. So, daily grades including welding tasks, written work, written tests, and the welding final will total 100% of the final grade. Extra credit may be awarded if students are involved in one or more of the various extra activities that are made available to all students who wish to participate.

Grading Scale and Policy

A = 93.3 - 100
A- = 90 - 93.2
B+ = 86.6 - 89.9
B = 83.3 - 86.5
B- = 80 - 83.2
C+ = 76.6 - 79.9
C = 73.3 - 76.5
C- = 70 - 73.2
D+ = 66.6 - 69.9
D = 63.3 - 66.5
D- = 60 - 63.2
E = 0-59.9

Attendance, attitude, social behavior, work ethic and available extra credit assignments will determine whether a borderline grade will be raised or lowered. Students are expected to carry themselves professionally while treating each other respectfully. Social, academic and technical skills are all taught in the class to further prepare students for advancement into college, or entry level work in the welding industry.

Work-Based Learning (Course Requirment)

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Program Attendance Policy

Students must attend class regularly in order to receive credit or be considered for employment and competitive opportunities. If a student needs to be absent due to illness or an emergency situation, including court, funerals etc, she (he) should contact the office and bring in documentation for all absences. The main office will determine whether an absence is unexcused, excused, documented or undocumented.  All make-up work is required to be done within the first week of an absence. A student loses credit for the class when they exceed the 15 days absence limit unless they make arrangements to make up all hours missed over the 15 days and complete course requirements per instructor expectations.  Make up time and assignments must be arranged with the instructor.  NO credit will be given unless this requirement is met.  Remember! We are training students in preparation for entry level employment, all employers expect excellent attendance and great attitudes, please help support us in these important areas!
Students must receive permission from the instructor for all school related functions, co-op working arrangements, field trips, competitions and any class sponsored experiences. 

Certificates that may be awarded

Certificate of completion to students who complete one full year in the program with at least 70% of welding competencies at a level of 2 or higher on a 4 point scale.
Certificate of completion with outstanding achievement to students completing one full year in the welding program with at least 80% of welding competencies at a level 3 or higher on a 4 point scale.

Thank you very much for any support you provide for your son or daughter! I will do my best to help you in preparing your son/daughter for a successful school year and life.

Mr. Regets may be contacted by e-mail at regets@wwcsd.net or phone at 734-419-2127

Locations

All courses except CADD & Early Childhood/Teacher Education are offered at:

William D. Ford Career-Technical Center
36455 Marquette
Westland, Michigan 48185
Phone: 734-419-2100
Fax: 734-595-2127

Location for CADD

Wayne Memorial High School
3001 Fourth Street
Wayne, Michigan 48184
Phone: 734-419-2200
Fax: 734-595-2227

Location for Early Childhood/Teacher Education

Wayne-Westland Community Schools Educational Complex
36745 Marquette
Westland, MI 48185
Phone: 734-419-2000
Fax: 734-595-2123