Alternative Energy Technology

Alternative Energy Technology:

1 year - 3 credits
 

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement. This program will introduce and develop the basic skills necessary to succeed in the new “green” and high-tech world of alternative energy. Students will explore the basic concepts of solar power and its applications, with an emphasis on photovoltaic systems.  The students will also analyze the modern application and utilization of wind power, concentrating on the usage of varying sizes of wind turbines for use in urban, rural and industrial areas. Theory is reinforced by practical application lab projects, culminating in working with solar panels and wind turbines.  This course will also explore biomass production, which will include alternative fuels used in electricity generation.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Identification of major components used in digital circuits
  • Basic AC/DC circuit analysis
  • PC board layout and wire
  • Troubleshooting/problem-solving techniques
  • Basic house wiring
  • Intro to photovoltaic installation
  • Basic understanding of bio-fuels and bio mass
  • Wind turbine repair
  • Maintenance technician

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Computer Assisted AC and DC Experiments
  • Computer Assisted Digital Experiments
  • Digital Trainer
  • Dual Trace Scopes/Vom Multimeters
  • Function Generators
  • Wind Turbine Trainer
  • Solar Panel Trainer

Occupational Options:
 

  • Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
  • Customer Engineering Specialist
  • Electronics Tester/Assembler
  • Electro/Mechanical Technician
  • Prototype Technician
  • Solar Panel Installer
  • Solar Panel Repair and Maintenance Technician
  • Wind Turbine Repair and Maintenance Technician
  • Wind Turbine Installer

 

Automotive Collision Repair I & II

Auto Collision Repair I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to teach the skills of repairing collision damage to motor vehicles as well as minor restoration and refinishing of completed vehicles. Program activities include learning the arts of metal finishing, sheet metal shrinking, welding, plastic filler application, sheet metal alignment, and refinishing. The student will learn how to use welders, air powered grinders, sanders, polishers, spray guns, and sheet metal pulling devices.

Auto Collision Repair II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Auto Body Repair I and instructor's recommendation.

The second-year program is designed for the advanced student who wishes to gain additional experience in painting and learn the principles of frame and unibody straightening. A limited number of students will be selected by the instructor based upon interest and ability.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements. 

Skills Taught:
 

  • Metal finishing
  • Grinding
  • Plastic filler application
  • MIG welding
  • Body panel alignment
  • Body panel replacement
  • Spray painting
  • Buffing and polishing

Specialized Equipment: 
 

  • Hand tools
  • Power tools
  • Spray guns
  • Grinders
  • Polishers
  • Oxyacetylene torches
  • MIG welders
  • Downdraft spray booth
  • Frame equipment
  • Sand blasting equipment
  • Frame machine
  • Unispotter
  • HVLP spray guns
  • Gravity feed spray guns

Occupational Options: 
 

  • Automobile Body Customizer
  • Auto Frame Repairer
  • Air Brush Painter
  • Auto Body Repairer
  • Auto Body Painter
  • Finished Metal Repairer
  • Auto Body Repair Apprentice
  • Automotive Painter Apprentice

 

Automotive Collision Repair I Syllabus

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN I

COURSE SYALLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 47.0603
PSN: 11632
Course Number:
V0210-1    1 Year, 3 Credits
V0210-M    1 Year, 2 Credits plus 1 math credit

Can also receive 4th year math or VPAA Credit

Instructor: James Holland
Teaching Assistant: John Ramirez

Time: Monday-Friday
1st Shift: 7:25 am - 10:05 am
2nd Shift: 11:10 am - 1:50 pm

Location: Lab:  Room 116
Phone: 734-419-2140

The Automotive Collision Repair Technician 1 program is a two semester block class.  In the first semester, the curriculum deals with orientation of the collision industry, career and employability skills and personal / shop safety.

In the second semester, the curriculum deals with substrate identification and preparation, refinishing equipment and undercoats and corrosion protection.

Course Objectives – Segments:
 

  1. Collision Industry Orientation
  2. Career & Employability Skills
  3. Personal & Shop Safety
  4. Substrate Identification and Preparation
  5. Spray Equipment
  6. Undercoats & Corrosion Protection
  7. Mixing and Applying Topcoats
  8. Final Detailing
  9. Advanced Color Mixing and Refinishing
  10. Paint Problems/Defects
  11. Damage Analysis/Estimating
  12. Refinishing Certifications

The basic Automotive Collision Repair Technician 1 class consists of an academic component – lecture, book assignments, demos, hands-on practice, tests and quizzes.  Within the first 4 weeks, every student will need to go to a body shop and get a damaged fender for their first project.

Book: Motor Auto Body Repair, Robert Scharff & James E. Duffy, Delmar 6th Edition, (2015)

September – June
 

  1. Student paperwork – information papers, Safety Pledge, etc.
  2. Orientation of lab & shop, career paths and the beginning of a yearlong discussion on safety, testing on safety and following safety rules
  3. Tool identification, usage and safety (Hand, power tools)
  4. Discussions about substrates and the beginning of the hands-on experience
  5. Metal finishing, heat shrinking (oxyacetylene welder) and MIG welding
  6. Plastic filler application, grinding and sanding
  7. Discussions about spray equipment (transfer rates, types, styles and guns that meet 6H rules of compliancy
  8. Coatings training starting with undercoats, corrosion protection & ending with topcoats
  9. Employability skills through Career Ready 101/Career Cruising and resume writing

Certificates That May Be Awarded:

Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement – awarded to those students that complete a full year of the program with at least 80% of applicable competencies at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Certificate of Completion – awarded to those students completing a full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies completed at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Post-Secondary Articulated Credits:

Students may be eligible to receive free college credits for WDFCTC courses they successfully complete.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available will vary by program and college with which it is affiliated.

End of Program Assessment Exam:

There will be an end of the year program assessment that is required by the State of Michigan, which is ASE/NATEF exit exam.  It will be taken by 2nd year seniors.  For additional information about grading, evaluation, attendance policies, classroom & lab rules, see the Automotive Collision Repair Student Handbook.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help.  Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for you.  Test/quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Base Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate.  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year.  Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study.  The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site.  Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Automotive Collision Repair II Syllabus

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 47.0603
PSN: 11632
Course Number:
V0220-1        1 Year, 3 Credits
V0220-M        1 Year, 2 Credits plus 1 math credit

Can also receive 4th year math or VPAA Credit

Instructor: James Holland
Teaching Assistant: John Ramirez

Time: Monday - Friday
1st Shift: 7:25 am – 10:05 am
2nd Shift: 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Location: Lab: Room 116
Phone: 734-419-2140

This course is a continuation of Automotive Collision Repair Technician I, and is designed to provide students with opportunity to work on projects facilitated by the instructor and some special projects of there own. Students also have the opportunity to work on customer’s car and do some minor and major repairs.

Standards:
 

  • Students will do a review on equipment and shop safety. A1-6, C1-5
  • Students will help in demo of hand and power tools to first year’s students with the instructor assistants.
  • Students will have the understanding of metal finishing, heat shrinking, Mig welding patch and plastic filler of poly putty. D1-15
  • Students will have the understanding of surface prep, spray guns (siphon, gravity feed, HVLP, LVLP), and maintenance of spray guns. C1-5
  • Students will have the understanding of (primers) undercoats (base, surface, sealer), topcoats (basecoat/clear coat), and Urethane and add stripes, B1-22, graphics or flames with wet sanding and polish of finish project. F1.
  • Students will have the understanding of typical paint problems. E1-29
  • Students will have the understanding of customer service panel removals and installation, porter skills. F2-5

Course Objectives – Segment:
 

  1. Collision Industry Orientation
  2. Career & Employability Skills
  3. Person & Shop Safety
  4. Substrate Identification and Preparation
  5. Spray Equipment
  6. Undercoats & Corrosion Protection
  7. Mixing & Apply Topcoats
  8. Final Detailing
  9. Advanced Color Mixing and Refinishing
  10. Paint Problems/ Defects
  11. Damage Analysis/Estimating
  12. Refinishing Certifications

The advanced Automotive Collision Repair Technician II class consists of an academic component – lecture, book assignments, demo, hands-on practice, test and quizzes. Within the first 4 weeks, every student will need to go to a body shop and get a damaged fender for their first project.

Book: Motor Auto Repair, Robert Scharff & James E. Duffy, Delmar 6th Edition, (2015).

September – June
 

  1. Students paperwork – information paper, Safety Pledge, etc.
  2. Orientation of lab & shop, career paths and the beginning of the year long discussion on safety and following safety, testing on safety and following safety rules.
  3. Tool identification, usage and safety (Hand, power tools).
  4. Discussion about substrates and the beginning of the hands-on experience.
  5. Metal finishing, heat shrinking (oxyacetylene welder) and MIG welding.
  6. Plastic filler application, grinding and sanding.
  7. Discussion about spray equipment (transfer rate, types, styles and guns that meet 6H rules of compliancy.
  8. Coating training starting with undercoats, corrosion protection & ending with topcoats.
  9. Employability skills through Career Ready 101/Career Cruising and resume Writing.

Certificates That May Be Awarded

Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement – awarded to those students that complete a full year of the program with at least 80% of applicable competencies at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Certificate of Completion – awarded to those students that complete a full year of the program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher on a 4 point scale.

End of Program Assessment Exam:

There will be an end of the year program assessment that is required by the State of Michigan, which is ASE/NATEF exit exam. It will be taken by 2nd year seniors. For additional information about grading, evaluation, attendance policies, classroom rules, see the Automotive Collision Repair Student Handbook.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for you. Test/quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangement may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Base Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Base Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience(s) will be required to find a site where they spend a minimum of one class period in business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Post-Secondary Articulated Credits:

Students may be eligible to receive free college credits for WDFCTC courses they successfully complete.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available will vary by program and college with which it is affiliated.

 

Automotive Technology I & II

Automotive Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to prepare students for a career in the high demand area of automotive technology. Students learn shop practices, use of tools, shop safety and the use of diagnostic test equipment. Theory and practice are combined to perform basic service in engine repair, engine performance, electrical systems, brake systems, suspension, wheel alignment, steering, air conditioning and light transmission repair. Students will work in a large state-of-the-art, 16 bay service area with up to date service tools.

Automotive Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Automotive Technology I or instructor's recommendation.

The student will participate in a dealership-like service program in a large modern shop. The student will diagnose and repair vehicle brake, cooling, steering and suspension, electrical, and engine performance systems. Upon completion of the program, students will be prepared to take and pass the Michigan Mechanics Certification Test.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

All Automotive classes are taught by ASE certified instructors.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Troubleshooting
  • Lubrication
  • Parts ordering
  • Computerized engine control diagnosis
  • Oscilloscope use
  • Engine rebuilding
  • Air conditioning service
  • Wheel alignment
  • Steering and suspension service
  • Light drive train repair
  • Cooling system servicing
  • Electrical system diagnosis
  • Customer Service Skills
  • Brake Diagnosis and repair

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Brake machine center
  • Mitchell information system
  • Hunter wheel alignment machine
  • Vehicle computer scan tools
  • Manufacturer specific training tools
  • Refrigerant recycle system
  • Hunter balance equipment
  • Manufacturer’s Diagnostic Equipment
  • Coolant exchange machine
  • Transmission fluid exchange machine
  • A/C recover and recharge stations
  • RIM clamp tire machines
  • On car brake lathe

Occupational Options:
 

  • Auto Electric Specialist
  • Engine Performance Specialist
  • Engine Rebuilder
  • Air Conditioning Specialist
  • Brake Specialist
  • Suspension Specialist
  • Mechanic’s Assistant
  • General Mechanic
  • Emission Specialist
  • Parts Service Advisor
  • Parts Counter Person

 

Automotive Technology I Syllabus

Automotive Technology I Syllabus

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Course Name: Automotive Technology I
CIP Number: 47.0604
Course Number: V0320
Course Credit: 1.5 credits per semester

Instructors: Mark Batko and Len Sheko

Course Description:

The Automotive Technology program is designed to prepare students for a career in the automotive service industry. Students learn automotive systems, tool usage, shop safety, and the use of diagnostic test equipment. Theory and practice are combined to give the student a good educational experience in the field of automotive service. Selected students will be able to participate in our AYES Program which can lead to internships at local dealerships. Aptitude, good attendance and enthusiasm are essential for selection and participation in the AYES Program.

Program Information:

The automotive technology course at the William D. Ford Career Technical Center is certified by the National Automotive Teacher Education Foundation (NATEF) in Maintenance and Light Repair. Students will receive instruction on the theory and operation of each of the 12 segments in the classroom. Classroom instructional methods will include lecture, demonstrations, discussions, video, and internet presentations.

The following segments will be covered in the first and second semesters of the class.

They include:
 

  • Employability Skills, TDL, and Industrial Safety
  • Electrical – General Electrical Systems and Theory and Operation
  • Electrical – Battery Diagnosis and Service
  • Electrical – Starting and Charging Systems Diagnosis and Repair
  • Electrical – Lighting Systems, Horn, and Wiper/Washer Diagnosis and Repair
  • Electrical – Gauges, Warning Devices Diagnosis and Repair
  • Electrical – Accessories Diagnosis and Repair
  • Brakes – General Brake Systems & Hydraulic Systems Diagnosis and Repair
  • Brakes – Drum and Disc Brake Diagnosis and repair
  • Brakes – Power Assist Units Diagnosis and repair
  • Brakes - Miscellaneous (Wheel Bearings, E- Brake) Diagnosis and Repair
  • Brakes – Electronic Brake, Traction and Stability Control Diagnosis & Repair

Students will then couple the knowledge learned in the classroom with practical hands on exercises in the automotive lab. These exercises may be performed on simulated automotive trainers, finding and correcting faults placed in shop vehicles by the instructors, or in some cases on the student’s own vehicle. To complete the hands on tasks, the students have access to some of the latest automotive service tools. These tools include manufacturers scan tools, electrical test equipment, air conditioning recovery and recharging stations, and specialty tools designed to service the various automotive systems.

Work based learning:

Work based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be give opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

The instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs

Course Objectives:

    

  1. To prepare students for employment in the automotive service industry.
  2. To prepare students for the Michigan Mechanics Certification Test.
  3. To introduce desirable attitudes toward work and quality of performance.
  4. To develop safe work habits.
  5. To develop respect for the property of customers and fellow workers.

Course Text and Reference Materials:

 

  1. Modern Automotive Technology by James E. Duffy, 2014 edition, published by Goodheart and Wilcox
  2. AYES online curriculum
  3. Manufacturers Manuals
  4. Mitchell on Demand Vehicle Service Information System
  5. Honda Service and Training Web Site

Attendance Policy:

The William D. Ford Career Technical Center places a high priority on attendance because the attendance pattern established by the student in school often sets an attendance pattern for employment. Class attendance is necessary for learning and academic achievement as well as for developing the habits of punctuality, dependability, and self-discipline demanded by business and industry. Regular attendance in the Career Centers labs is essential to allow students to fully participate in class instruction, discussion and skill development. Absences beyond eight days for each semester are considered excessive. Both excused and unexcused absences are counted in the student’s total.

Certificates that may be awarded:

Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement. Outstanding certificates are awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale. Printout of their skills will be attached.

Certificate of Completion. Certificates are awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale. Printout of their skills will be attached.

Students with total points lower than level 2 on a 4-point scale will not receive a certificate, but will receive a printout of their skills.

Certificate of Perfect Attendance. Awarded to those with perfect attendance for each semester with special recognition for those with perfect attendance for the entire school year.

Certificate of Outstanding Attendance. Presented to students maintaining a minimum of 95% attendance for the school year.

Grading Policy:

 

Written homework    =    25%
Quizzes    =    10%
Final test    =    10%
Daily Grade    =    20%
Lab/Checklist    =    35%

Teacher Expectations:

Automotive service is a satisfying career, but can be dangerous if safe work practices are not followed. Students should wear clothing and shoes appropriate for the automotive technology program. Safety glasses need to worn by the students whenever they are in the shop to avoid eye injuries. Vehicles driven into the shop must travel slowly to avoid accidents. Failure to follow safe work practices can cause serious injuries.

 

Student name – please print: _________________________________  has read and understands the class syllabus for Automotive Technology.

Student Signature & Date: _________________________________    ______________

Parent/Guardian Signature & Date: _________________________________    ______________

 

 

Automotive Technology II Syllabus

Automotive Technology II Syllabus

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Course Name: Automotive Technology II
CIP Number: 47.0604
Course Number: V0320
Course Credit: 1.5 credits per semester

Instructors: Mark Batko and Len Sheko

Course Description Q segments:

This course is a continuation of Automotive Technology I and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on independent projects facilitated by the instructor. Q segments include:

  • Identify general shop safety rules and procedures
  • Identify and use proper procedures for safe lift operation
  • Comply with the required use of safety glasses during lab/shop
  • Demonstrate safe handling and use of appropriate tools
  • Demonstrate proper use of precision measuring tools
  • Complete work order to include customer information, & vehicle information
  • Dress appropriately and use language and manners suitable for the workplace
  • Analyzes and resolves problems that arise in completing assigned tasks
  • Uses scientific, technical, engineering and math principles to accomplish tasks
  • Diagnosing automotive problems by working on customer vehicles
  • Assist the instructor by helping the first year automotive students

Program Information:

The automotive technology course at the William D. Ford Career Technical Center is certified by the National Automotive Teacher Education Foundation (NATEF) in Maintenance and Light Repair. Classroom instructional methods will include lecture, demonstrations, discussions, video, and internet presentations.

Students will then couple the knowledge learned in the classroom with practical hands on exercises in the automotive lab. These exercises may be performed on simulated automotive trainers, finding and correcting faults placed in shop vehicles by the instructors, or in some cases on the student’s own vehicle. To complete the hands on tasks, the students have access to some of the latest automotive service tools. These tools include manufacturers scan tools, electrical test equipment, air conditioning recovery and recharging stations, and specialty tools designed to service the various automotive systems.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that is convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibility be before or after school. Tests/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work Based Learning:

Work based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be give opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Course Objectives:

    

  1. To prepare students for employment in the automotive service  industry.
  2. To prepare students for the Michigan Mechanics Certification Test.
  3. To introduce desirable attitudes toward work and quality of performance.
  4. To develop safe work habits.
  5. To develop respect for the property of customers and fellow workers.

Course Text and Reference Materials:

 

  1. Modern Automotive Technology by James E. Duffy, 2014 edition, published by Goodheart and Wilcox.
  2. AYES online curriculum
  3. Manufacturers Manuals
  4. Mitchell on Demand Vehicle Service Information System
  5. Honda Service and Training Web Site

Attendance Policy:

The William D. Ford Career Technical Center places a high priority on attendance because the attendance pattern established by the student in school often sets an attendance pattern for employment. Class attendance is necessary for learning and academic achievement as well as for developing the habits of punctuality, dependability, and self-discipline demanded by business and industry. Regular attendance in the Career Centers labs is essential to allow students to fully participate in class instruction, discussion and skill development. Absences beyond eight days for each semester are considered excessive. Both excused and unexcused absences are counted in the student’s total.

Certificates that may be awarded:

Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement. Outstanding certificates are awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale. Printout of their skills will be attached.

Certificate of Completion. Certificates are awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale. Printout of their skills will be attached.

Students with total points lower than level 2 on a 4-point scale will not receive a certificate, but will receive a printout of their skills.

Certificate of Perfect Attendance. Awarded to those with perfect attendance for each semester with special recognition for those with perfect attendance for the entire school year.

Certificate of Outstanding Attendance. Presented to students maintaining a minimum of 95% attendance for the school year.

Grading Policy:

Written homework = 25%
Quizzes = 10%
Final test  = 10%
Daily grade = 20%
Lab/Checklist = 35%

Teacher Expectations:

Automotive service is a satisfying career, but can be dangerous if safe work practices are not followed. Students should wear clothing and shoes appropriate for the automotive technology program. Safety glasses need to worn by the students whenever they are in the shop to avoid eye injuries. Vehicles driven into the shop must travel slowly to avoid accidents. Failure to follow safe work practices can cause serious injuries.

 

Student name – please print: _________________________________   has read and understands the class syllabus for automotive Technology.

Student Signature & Date: _________________________________    ______________

Parent/Guardian Signature & Date: _________________________________    ______________

 

Computer Aided Design / Drafting I & II

Computer Aided Design/Drafting I (CADD):

1 year – 2 or 3 credits

Prerequisite: Recommended but not required - Basic Drafting

This program is a high tech approach to drafting and design that prepares individuals to interpret, plan and modify architectural, mechanical and structural sketches.  Students will be exposed to industry related problems while being provided extensive experience involving the most recent software programs and equipment.  Emphasis will be in the development of skills and knowledge essential for employment as a CADD designer/draftsperson.

Computer Aided Design/Drafting II (CADD):

1 year – 2 or 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from CADD I and instructor's recommendation.

This course is structured for advanced students who wish to continue to develop their CADD skills in the designated fields of study and also those students involved in a co-op placement. Students have the choice to focus their learning towards a particular field of study (Architecture or Manufacturing) that involves related projects. The following CADD software’s will be reviewed and introduced: AutoCad, AutoDesk Inventor, Revit and Solidworks.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Architectural Drafting Skills:
 

  • Elevations
  • Floor plans
  • Model building
  • Open framing models
  • Parametric modeling
  • Rendering
  • Sections – building / roof / wall
  • Site plans

Technical Drafting Skills:
 

  • Additive manufacturing (3D Printing)
  • Assembly drawings
  • Basic drafting fundamentals
  • Exploded-view drawings
  • Parametric modeling
  • Product rendering
  • Sheetmetal layout
  • Supplemental view - auxiliary/section

Featured Software:
 

  • AutoCad
  • AutoDesk Inventor Pro
  • AutoDesk Revit
  • SketchUp Pro
  • Solidworks

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Afina H800 3D printer
  • Dell Precision T1700 workstation
  • HP500 DesignJet large printer
  • HP520 DesignJet large format
  • HP5000GN Laserjet printer

Occupational Options:
 

  • Architectural Draftsman
  • Design Engineer
  • Electrical Schematic Layout
  • Facilities Layout
  • Manufacturing/Tooling
  • Mechanical Draftsman
  • Technical Illustration

Competitions/Organizations:
 

  • MITES (Michigan Industrial Technology Education Society)
  • SkillsUSA

 

CADD I Syllabus

CADD I / Syllabus

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP Number 15.1301
Course Number V3810

CADD Instructor: David Brinkerhoff

INTRO

The goal of this program is not just to learn a CADD (computer aided design-drafting) program, but to prepare and develop students Architectural and Technical Drafting fundamentals and skills so that their proficiency and knowledge is at the level where he or she will be able to go out into the world and pursue a career.  Students will be challenged with workplace problems and be involved in several different types of computer and hands-on activities.  An emphasis is placed on exploring careers which utilize CADD skills.

CLASS RESPONSIBILITIES and GUIDELINES

The time spent on assignments is the responsibility of that individual.  How you get there depends on you and your determination!  How you utilize that time is your choice.  Use it wisely.  Completing an assignment is only part of the task.  Producing quality work by showing that you have mastered the skill is the goal. The following guidelines are behavior standards or expectations that are to be observed at all times.

  • Obey all school rules.
  • Be respectful (towards others and their property).
  • Be ready (mentally and physically).
  • Do not disrupt the learning of others.
  • The golden rule.

CREDIT

Upon completion of this course, students are able to receive the following credits that can be applied towards their requirements for graduation - senior math related credit; visual, performing and applied art (VPAA); science credit; and world language credit (science and world language credit is only applied after completion of the yearlong CADD course).

STUDENT LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES  

Students have several opportunities to participate in leadership and or student design competitions. Skills-USA; MITES (Michigan Industrial Technical Education Society); NTHS (National Technical Honor Society); Robotics First; Co-Op

WORK BASED LEARNING

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher's signed permission, the parent/guardian's signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

EXTRA HELP  

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that's convenient for both you and the instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

EVALUATION

Students will be evaluated on different types of classroom activities (drawings, quizzes, projects) and more importantly – participation. Drawings will be assessed on the following criteria Accuracy (was the problem constructed correctly); Completion (was the problem completed?  Was the problem completed on time?  Was the title block properly filled out); Display (does the drawing look good?  Organization, Line weights, Line quality, etc…) Participation is based on attendance, tardiness, and effective class time use.  Excused absences will not be counted against the student. Unexcused absences will result in a loss of the student’s participation points for that day.  Tardiness could result in a loss of some of a portion of the students’ points for that day.

* District policy allows a total of 15 absences per semester.  More than 15 could result in the student not receiving credit for the course.

* Copying another students’ file and claiming it as your own will result is a 0 for the project…If it happens again, that student will be dealt with according to the school’s rules and regulations.

***Music; the use of an I-pod is permitted, however, please have your headphones in and the music level should be kept to an acceptable level.  Phone; the use of a personal cell phone is not permitted in class, they can be out, but use should be kept to a minimal.  Food; No food or beverages of any kind are allowed in the lab.

GRADING SYSTEM

A student can earn a possible of 10 points a day.  The number of points that each assignment is worth will be equal to the amount of time required to complete the assignment.  For example, if a drawing should take three days to construct, it’s worth 30 points.  All assignments will be allocated a number of points.  The total number of points earned divided by the total possible equals’ grade percentage. The grading system in this class is a standard format.

A…93% or higher; A-…92% - 90%; B+…89% - 87%; B…86% - 83%; B-…82% - 80%; C+…79% - 77%; C… 76% - 73%; C-…72% - 70%; D+…69% - 67%; D…66% - 63%; D-…62% - 60%; anything below is failing

LAB EQUIPMENT

A variety tools and materials that are involved in this course will be provided.  They can be expensive.  They do not leave the classroom.  They become the students’ responsibility.  Please take care of them.

TEXTBOOKS

BASIC TECHNICAL DRAWING 7th ed. - by Spencer, Dygdon, and Novak
ENGINEERING DRAWING AND DESIGN 6th ed. - by Jensen, Helsel and Short
TECHNICAL DRAWING 11th ed. - by Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill, Dygdon and Novak.
ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIAL DRAFTING/DESIGN 7th ed. - by Clois E. Kicklighter

LAB SOFTWARE

The lab is currently licensed with the following computer-aided-design-drafting software: AutoCad 2017; Autodesk Inventor 2017; SketchUp; Solidworks 20017; Revit 2017; Microsoft Office Suite.

CONTACT INFO

The following is my school email address and the phone numbers where I can be reached: brinkerhoffd@wwcsd.net

John Glenn H.S. Office        (734) 419-2300    rm. #147    (734) 419-2315
William D. Ford C.T.C. Office        (734) 419-2100

OPEN DOOR POLICY

My door is always open if there are any questions, concerns, etc.  Please communicate with the instructor.

CADD I OVERVIEW

The focus of this course is to introduce the students to different fields which involve CADD and the software programs that apply.  Mainly the design fields of Architecture and Manufacturing. The first semester of the course will focus on Manufacturing Drafting applications and the following CADD software’s will be utilized: AutoCad 2017 and AutoDesk Inventor 2017.  The following units will be covered and the student will be able too successfully complete problems related to those standards.

Academic Foundations: Demonstrate language arts, math and science skills.

Assembly Drawings: A drawing that shows how different parts are connected with all parts in their functional positions.

Auxiliary Views: An additional view obtained by a projection on a plane other than the traditional projection planes.  Primary and secondary.

Blueprint Reading: Designed to help students develop the basic skills required for visualizing and interpreting industrial prints.

Communications: Apply active speaking and listening skills to enhance communication skills.

Dimensioning: Use Conventional and Coordinate dimensioning techniques.

Geometric Constructions (segment 1): All traditional drawing and CADD drawing techniques are based on the construction of basic geometric elements.

Information Technology Applications: Employ technological tools and demonstrate digital workplace skills.

Employability and Career Development: Explore different career fields and employability skills.

Exploded-View Drawings: A drawing that shows all the parts of an assembly and how they fit together.

Orthographic Layout: The required views of an object that provide the shape description of the object.

Parametric Modeling: A computer generated 3D model where design parameters control the model geometry.

Safety, Health and Environmental: Implement personal and workplace safety regulations.

Sections: A cutaway view of a part that shows the internal features of a part.  Full, Half, Removed, Offset, Broken-out and Revolved.

Technical Skills (segment 10): Drafting Fundamentals, Principles and Concepts

Working Drawings (segment 3):   A drawing or series of drawings that are used as the specifications for manufacturing which normally consists of assembly and detail drawings.

Second semester of the course will focus on Architecture problems, specifically residential and the following CADD software’s will be utilized: AutoCad 2017 and Revit 2017.  The following topics will be covered and the student will be able too successfully complete problems related to those units.

Architectural Symbols (segment 2): Standardized elements on a drawing used to identify fixtures, doors, windows, stairs, partitions, and other common items.

Computer Generated Models (segment 10): CADD models are used to check the structural stability, orientation, and pictorial appearance of the design.

Elevations (segment 2):  Elevation drawings are orthographic representations of the exterior and interior of a structure.

Floor Plan (segment 2): A scaled drawing of the outline and partitions of a building as seen if the building were cut horizontally above the floor line.

Leadership and Teamwork (segment 12): Use leadership and teamwork skills in collaboration with others to accomplish goals and objectives.

Model Building Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking (segments 3, 5, 11): Structural members of a building are shown in a model.  These models are used to check structural methods and framing techniques.  ex. - Draw-Bridge Design; Foam Core Models

Sections (segments 6, 11): Architectural sections are drawings that show details not visible on floor plans or elevations (Foundation, Roof and Wall).

Site Plan (segment 4): Site plans describe the characteristics of the land and the relationship of all structures to the site.

Student Competitions (segment 12): MITES (Michigan Industrial Technology Education Society), Skills USA. Assist student preparation for competitions.

Systems (segments 5, 7, 9): Understand codes and workplace systems to demonstrate project and planning process to design and construct structures.

CADD II Syllabus

CADD II / Syllabus

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP Number 15.1301
Course Number V3820

CADD Instructor: David Brinkerhoff

INTRO

The goal of this program is not just to learn a CADD (computer aided design-drafting) program, but to prepare and develop students Architectural and Technical Drafting fundamentals and skills so that their proficiency and knowledge is at the level where he or she will be able to go out into the world and pursue a career.  Students will be challenged with workplace problems and be involved in several different types of computer and hands-on activities.  An emphasis is placed on exploring careers which utilize CADD skills.

CLASS RESPONSIBILITIES and GUIDELINES

The time spent on assignments is the responsibility of that individual.  How you get there depends on you and your determination!  How you utilize that time is your choice.  Use it wisely.  Completing an assignment is only part of the task.  Producing quality work by showing that you have mastered the skill is the goal. The following guidelines are behavior standards or expectations that are to be observed at all times.  

  • Obey all school rules.
  • Be respectful (towards others and their property).
  • Be ready (mentally and physically).
  • Do not disrupt the learning of others.
  • The golden rule.

CREDIT

Upon completion of this course, students are able to receive the following credits that can be applied towards their requirements for graduation - senior math related credit; visual, performing and applied art (VPAA); science credit; and world language credit (science and world language credit is only applied after completion of the yearlong CADD course).

STUDENT LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES  

Students have several opportunities to participate in leadership and/or student design competitions.  Skills-USA; MITES (Michigan Industrial Technical Education Society); NTHS (National Technical Honor Society); Robotics First; Co-Op.

WORK BASED LEARNING

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher's signed permission, the parent/guardian's signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

EXTRA HELP  

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that's convenient for both you and the instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

EVALUATION

Students will be evaluated on different types of classroom activities (drawings, quizzes, projects) and more importantly – participation. Drawings will be assessed on the following criteria Accuracy (was the problem constructed correctly); Completion (was the problem completed?  Was the problem completed on time?  Was the title block properly filled out); Display (does the drawing look good?  Organization, Line weights, Line quality, etc…) Participation is based on attendance, tardiness, and effective class time use.  Excused absences will not be counted against the student.  Unexcused absences will result in a loss of the student’s participation points for that day.  Tardiness could result in a loss of some of a portion of the students’ points for that day.

District policy allows a total of 15 absences per semester.  More than 15 could result of the student not receiving credit for the course.

Copying another students’ file and claiming it as your own will result is a 0 for the project.  If it happens again, that student will be dealt with according to the school’s rules and regulations.

***Music; the use of an I-pod is permitted, however, please have your headphones in and the music level should keep to an acceptable level.  Phone; the use of a personal cell phone is not permitted in class, they can be out, but use should be kept to a minimal.  Food; No food or beverages of any kind are allowed in the lab.

GRADING SYSTEM

A student can earn a possible of 10 points a day.  The number of points that each assignment is worth will be equal to the amount of time required to complete the assignment.  For example, if a drawing should take three days to construct, it’s worth 30 points.  All assignments will be allocated a number of points.  The total number of points earned divided by the total possible equals’ grade percentage. The grading system in this class is a standard format.

A…93% or higher; A-…92% - 90%; B+…89% - 87%; B…86% - 83%; B-…82% - 80%; C+…79% - 77%; C… 76% - 73%; C-…72% - 70%; D+…69% - 67%; D…66% - 63%; D-…62% - 60%; anything below is failing.

LAB EQUIPMENT

A variety tools and materials that are involved in this course will be provided.  They can be expensive.  They do not leave the classroom.  They become the students’ responsibility.  Please take care of them.

TEXTBOOKS

BASIC TECHNICAL DRAWING 7th ed. - by Spencer, Dygdon, and Novak
ENGINEERING DRAWING AND DESIGN 6th ed. - by Jensen, Helsel and Short
TECHNICAL DRAWING 11th ed. - by Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill, Dygdon and Novak.
ARCHITECTURE RESIDENTIAL DRAFTING/DESIGN 7th ed. - by Clois E. Kicklighter

LAB SOFTWARE

The lab is currently licensed with the following computer-aided-design-drafting software:

AutoCad 2017; Autodesk Inventor 2017; SketchUp; Solidworks 2017; Revit 2017; Microsoft Office Suite.

CONTACT INFO

The following is my school email address and the phone numbers where I can be reached… brinkerhoffd@wwcsd.net

John Glenn H.S Office       (734) 419-2300    rm. #147    (734) 419-2315

William D. Ford C.T.C. Office        (734) 419-2100

OPEN DOOR POLICY

My door is always open if there are any questions, concerns, etc.  Please communicate with the instructor.

CADD II OVERVIEW

This course is structured for advanced students who wish to continue to develop their CADD skills in the designated fields of study and also those students involved in a co-op placement.  Students have the choice to focus their learning towards a particular field of study (Architecture or Manufacturing) that involves related projects.  The following CADD software’s will be reviewed and introduced: AutoCad 2017; AutoDesk Inventor 2017; Revit 2017 and Solidworks 2017.

Segment Q standards
 

Architectural

 

Multi-Level Elevations: Students create elevation drawings involving multilevel structures.

Problem-Solving/Critical Thinking: Open-Framing Construction: These drawings consist of exterior and interior stud layout - wall, door and window framing techniques.

Portfolio: Students develop a portfolio (digital & traditional) that includes examples of their classroom practice and projects.

Presentation Rendering: Photo-realistic representation of the project 3-D computer model.

Mechanical

 

Alternate CADD Systems:  Additional workplace CADD systems (Solidworks) are introduced.

Complex Component Modeling: Problems related to Industry standards practiced in the workplace.

Complex Assembly: Complex, advanced problems involving several components.

Gears & Pulleys: Students learn concepts involving gears, pulleys and ratios.

Manufacturing Processes (Additive Manufacturing): Students will be involved with the process of using a 3-D printer to convert their computer model into a real functioning part.

Occupation Preparation: Providing students with the opportunity in the workplace based on availability.

Portfolio: Students develop a portfolio (digital & traditional) that includes examples of their classroom practice and projects.

Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking: Tower Crane Project; Submersible Project; Catapult Project Audio Speaker System.

Presentation Rendering: Photo-realistic representation of the project.

Secondary Auxiliary Views:  An additional view obtained by a projection on a plane other than the traditional projection planes.  Primary and secondary.

Sheet Metal Development: Referred to as pattern drawing, the layout is used as a pattern for tracing out the developed shape on flat material.

Threads & Fasteners: Fastening devices used for assembling component parts.

 

Construction Technology I & II

Construction Technology 1

CIP 46.0000

Instructor: Adam Gorring
Gorringa@wwcsd.net
734-419-2141

Grading Scale

100%    =   A+
94-99%    =   A
90-93%    =   A-
87-89%    =   B+
84-86%    =   B
80-83%    =   B-
77-79%    =   C+
74-76%    =   C
70-73%    =   C-
67-69%    =   D+
64-66%    =   D
60-63%    =   D-
0-59%    =   E

Grading Outline

35% Employability/Attendance
25% Site/Lab work
20% Algebra
20% Tests

Congratulations on your decision to enroll in Construction Technology 1! Construction is a noble trade affording you a highly competitive wage and the ability to work for yourself. There is great pride in a job well done and we strive to show you how valued these skills are. When someone has a hole in their roof they will call you and pay you fairly for the work you do. This course is unlike most educational experiences you have encountered. We work with our hands, learn real world skills, and are part of an established network of tradespeople. Welcome to our team.

You will earn your grade based on performance in the grading outline categories. Attendance is critical as your work and employability cannot be measured if you're not here. Embedded math is a key component of this course and, as such, it will be respected. In order to participate in any construction related work, all math assignments must be completed and turned in. Each day you are off the job you are not getting paid therefore you will receive a zero in class.

Point Sheet

Each day you will be actively evaluated in two categories:
 

  1. Employability: 4 points available for display of proper work habits
    Ex: Boots on and tools ready on time, safety glasses on, safe practices
  2. Work: 10 points available for your quality of work
    Ex: Accuracy in work, attention to detail, cleaning up

Student Initials: ________________

Note: A routine day would result in a 4/8. A 10 point day is above and beyond work ethic earned through helping others when ahead, doing advanced projects, taking on extra clean up, among other things.

What We Do

All aspects of framing including floors, walls, staircases, and roof systems are covered.  You will learn to install drywall, siding, shingles, windows, doors, baseboards, electrical, plumbing, and more.  All the while, you are earning your Algebra 2 credit with a hands-on approach.  Next year, build an entire house in Construction Technology 2.

A Day in the Life
 

  • Boots, tool belt, safety glasses and all other course materials are ready approximately 5 minutes after the bell rings
  • Most days there will be a quick recap of material, an introduction of new material, and a demonstration
  • Remainder of time is spent out of your seat, in the shop, working on the assignment
  • Tests and writes on occasion
  • Embedded algebra Monday and Wednesday (8:21-9:11am, 12:03-12:52pm)
  • Breaks are earned (9:11-9:26am, 12:52-1:07pm). The food line and commons are privileges earned as a class through proper conduct. I reserve the right to refuse breaks at any time for any reason.
  • Each student gets three bathroom passes per semester. Beyond three is an automatic deduction in points. One bathroom pass is issued at a time for the class.

Basic Class Rules
 

  1. Keep hands, feet, and mouth to yourself
  2. Refrain from talking while instructor has the floor
  3. Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated
  4. Give each assignment your full attention and stay on task
  5. Be on time and ready to work
  6. No electronics of any kind

Electronics Continued
 

  1. 1st offense – Verbal warning
  2. 2nd offense- Cell phone is taken and placed in cell block until the end of class, with a one page write explaining the infraction. Also results in automatic deduction of points.
  3. 3rd offense- Cell phone is taken, placed in cell block until end of class, results in a two page write explaining the infraction. Also results in automatic deduction of points and a call home.
  4. 4th offense - Cell phone is taken; a one page write is assigned for you to explain the infraction and your 3 prior offenses. If a situation can’t be resolved, then the matter will result in a meeting with the principal.

Student Initials: ________________

Attendance

***15 minutes late to class is an absence***

Days Absent    Grade
(per 6 week marking period)    (35% max)
 0 30-35% = A
1 25-29% = A-
2 15-24% = B
3 5-14% = C
4  0-4% = D to E

   

Note: an absence will automatically be taken at the lowest range. Ex- If you're absent one day, you will be marked at 25% as you are unemployable as a no call/no show. The way to get to the high end of the range is to display the good work habit of calling or e-mailing me in advance. A call from someone other than you gets you no points, but it’s always nice to hear from them.

Student Initials: ________________

Tests and Quizzes

If absent the day of test, and have called me ahead of time, you are required to take the test the following day. You are responsible for asking me for the test when you return. Failure to call results in a 0 for the test and failure to take the test the following day results in a 0.

Unemployment

If showing habitual unsafe practices and disregard for classroom policies, you will no longer have the privilege of working in the shop environment for the semester. You will collect your work experience from the corresponding chapter in our course textbook.

Segments Covered
 

  • Segment 1:    Safety, Health, and Environmental
  • Segment 2:    Industry Overview
  • Segment 3:    Employability and Technical Skills
  • Segment 4:    Construction Materials
  • Segment 5:    Construction Tools and Equipment
  • Segment 6:    Building Construction Design Blueprint, etc.
  • Segment 7:    Site Preparation and Infrastructure
  • Segment 8:    Common Construction Practices, Concepts, Flooring, Foundations etc.
  • Segment 9:    Residential Construction Techniques (Carpentry)
  • Segment 10:    Green Technology Construction Techniques
  • Segment 11:    Heavy Equipment / Civil Construction Techniques
  • Segment 12:    Construction Business Management

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan.  In order to qualify for college credits, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology.  In addition, you must attend Construction Technology for 2 years.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

I have read and understanding the classroom policies for Construction Technology 1. Please sign and date below and return to instructor.

Student Signature __________________________

Date ________________

Parent Signature ___________________________

Date ________________


Construction Technology II

I. IDENTIFYING INFORMATION

 

Course Name:    Construction Technology II
CIP Number: 46.0000
Course Number: YR2 V0620
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times:
Monday – Friday
7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Prerequisites: Construction Technology I

Instructor: Michael Koelzer
Phone Number: (734) 419-2141
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127
Email: koelzerm@wwcsd.net

Web Site:    www.wwcsd.net

Credit: This class meets either the Senior Year Math Related Credit or The Visual, Performing and Applied Arts Credit requirement for graduation.

This is a one year class.  1.5 credits per semester.

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

 

Textbooks

Title: Carpentry Residential Construction Academy
Publisher:  Thomson Delmar Learning
Required:  Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students must purchase:  Tool belt, framing hammer, cat’s paw, speed square, tape measure, utility knife, chalk line, work boots

Skills USA

Skills USA is a student-led organization.  Students have the option to participate in competitions.

III. COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Construction Technology II (On-Site)

Prerequisite:  Certificate of Completion from Construction Technology I (In-School) and/or instructor’s recommendation.  This is the real deal.  In this program students actually build a residential home from the ground up or completely renovate an existing home.  Students are responsible for every aspect of the construction of this home.  The class is structured so the students are on site every day to develop the skills needed to be effective in any trade associated with construction.  Through the course of the school year students are trained as estimators and work in every trade that is used to build or renovate a home.  The trades include; rough carpentry, trim carpentry, plumbing, HVAC, electric, dry wall, masonry, cement flat-work, roofing, various types of siding and flooring.  After completing this program many students continue their education in construction and take the State of Michigan Residential Contractors Licensing exam.  Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

TECH Prep College Information:

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan.  In order to qualify for college credits at the colleges listed below, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology.  In addition, you must be accepted into the college list below and attend Construction Technology for 2 years. Please contact your advisor at the attending college for articulation paperwork.

Ferris State University
Henry Ford Community College
Washtenaw Community College
Wayne County Community College
Davenport University

IV. COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

 

Construction Technology II

 

Segment Q:

The second year of the program is devoted entirely to segment Q.  During this time the students build an entire home from the ground up.  This project is completed in partnership with the City of Westland Community Development department and utilizes federal home funds.

Standards:
 

  1. Safety: Students will earn 10 hour OSHA Safety Card
  2. Foundation: Students will be able to identify parts of a foundation and explain the process of constructing. Students will be able to explain how to make foundation energy efficient.
  3. Floor Framing: Students will be able to interpret blueprints to layout and install entire floor system.
  4. Wall Framing: Students will be able to interpret blueprints to layout and install interior and exterior walls. Students will be able to identify and explain green building techniques used in wall construction.
  5. Roof Framing: Students will be able to interpret truss layout and install entire truss package. Students will be able to build scaffolding and demonstrate safe elevated work practices.
  6. Shingle Installation: Students will be able to install architectural shingles on a roof system, utilizing ice guard, tar paper, ridge vent, step flashing, and valley flashing
  7. Insulation: Students will be able to insulate a home to meet current codes. Students will be able to blow insulation into an attic space to increase R-Value to the current code.
  8. Drywall: Students will be able to hang drywall on walls and ceilings.
  9. Trim/Flooring: Students will be able to hang and trim a pre-hung door, bi-fold door, and pocket door. Students will be able to install baseboard moldings, window sills, aprons, and casing. Students will be able to install kitchen and bath cabinets.
  10. Paint: Students will be able to operate an airless sprayer to spray and back roll walls and ceilings. Students will be able to identify the differences in paint types and sheens.
  11. Siding: Students will be able to install vinyl siding and accessories. Students will be able to bend all aluminum trim coverings with an aluminum break and install.

V. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

 

Grading Policy

 

Grading Framework:

 

33.3%    Tests/Homework 
33.3%    Employability/Leadership
33.3%    Performance

Grade Distribution:

98-100% = A+
94-97%    = A
90-93%     = A-
87-89%     = B+
84-86%     = B
80 –83%     = B-
77-79%     = C+
74-76%     = C
70-73%     = C-
67-69%     = D+
64 -66 %     = D
60 = 63%     = D-
0 – 59         = E

Homework/Paperwork

Homework may be assigned in conjunction with the various stages of construction on the home project.  It will be due upon the assigned due date or the student will not be able to join the team on the construction site.  If a situation arises that the student does not complete his/her assignment he/she will be required to stay at the Center to complete the assigned homework.  There will always be at least a three day notice before the assignment due date.  The grade reduction for a late assignment is 50 percent.  Work must be complete to receive a grade.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Employability

Attendance is crucial.  No one can learn how to build a home by not showing up.  Also the class/building project is based around teamwork and when you’re not present you only hurt the team.

Students are expected to be in class before the class starts 7:25 am and 11:10 am.  This is very important especially since we have to take a bus to the site every day.  If the student is later he/she will miss the bus.  Any student late enough to miss the bus to the job site is considered to be absent for the day and cannot earn points.  School transportation issues will be considered to be exceptions.

Performance

Each day is worth one fifth of the student’s weekly grade.  This is recorded by the student’s journal, attendance, and Mr. Koelzer’s observations.  After review of the logs and the weekly assessment the instructor will discuss the weekly grade with student.  The total worth or each week is figured the same as homework resulting in 33.3% of the semester grade.

Performance and employability measures all skills.  The student must be a team player use proper language, be on time, work steadily and efficiently, respect others and their property etc.

Notes:

Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  This is professional and helps the instructor prepare for class since there is a lot of teamwork and partnering in the building process.

If is the student’s responsibility to find out what they have missed while absent.

A tardy that is more than 15 minutes is considered an absence.

Certificate of Program Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with more than 25 absences in the school year.  This includes suspensions but not school related absences.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

I have read and understand the Construction Technology II Grading Policy

 

Student Signature _____________________________________________

Date ___________________

Student E-mail Address:________________________________________________________

 

Parent/Guardian Signature _____________________________________________

Date ___________________

Parent E-mail Address: _________________________________________________________

 

If you have any questions please contact Mr. Koelzer at 734.419.2100

 

Construction Technology I Syllabus

Construction Technology 1

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17


CIP: 46.0000
Instructor: Adam Gorring
Email: Gorringa@wwcsd.net
Phone: 734-419-2141

Grading Scale

100%    =   A+    74-76%    =   C
94-99%    =   A    70-73%    =   C-
90-93%    =   A-    67-69%    =   D+
87-89%    =   B+    64-66%    =   D
84-86%    =   B    60-63%    =   D-
80-83%    =   B-    0-59%    =   E
77-79%    =   C+

Grading Outline

35% Employability/Attendance
25% Site/Lab work
20% Algebra
20% Tests

Congratulations on your decision to enroll in Construction Technology 1! Construction is a noble trade affording you a highly competitive wage and the ability to work for yourself. There is great pride in a job well done and we strive to show you how valued these skills are. When someone has a hole in their roof they will call you and pay you fairly for the work you do. This course is unlike most educational experiences you have encountered. We work with our hands, learn real world skills, and are part of an established network of tradespeople. Welcome to our team.

You will earn your grade based on performance in the grading outline categories. Attendance is critical as your work and employability cannot be measured if you're not here. Embedded math is a key component of this course and, as such, it will be respected. In order to participate in any construction related work, all math assignments must be completed and turned in. Each day you are off the job you are not getting paid therefore you will receive a zero in class.

Point Sheet

Each day you will be actively evaluated in two categories:

  1. Employability: 4 points available for display of proper work habits
    1. Ex: Boots on and tools ready on time, safety glasses on, safe practices
  2. Work: 10 points available for your quality of work
    1. Ex: Accuracy in work, attention to detail, cleaning up

 

Student Initials: _____________

Note: A routine day would result in a 4/8. A 10 point day is above and beyond work ethic earned through helping others when ahead, doing advanced projects, taking on extra clean up, among other things.

What We Do

All aspects of framing including floors, walls, staircases, and roof systems are covered.  You will learn to install drywall, siding, shingles, windows, doors, baseboards, electrical, plumbing, and more.  All the while, you are earning your Algebra 2 credit with a hands-on approach.  Next year, build an entire house in Construction Technology 2.

A Day in the Life
 

  • Boots, tool belt, safety glasses and all other course materials are ready approximately 5 minutes after the bell rings
  • Most days there will be a quick recap of material, an introduction of new material, and a demonstration
  • Remainder of time is spent out of your seat, in the shop, working on the assignment
    • Tests and writes on occasion
    • Embedded algebra Monday and Wednesday (8:21-9:11am, 12:03-12:52pm)
  • Breaks are earned (9:11-9:26am, 12:52-1:07pm). The food line and commons are privileges earned as a class through proper conduct. I reserve the right to refuse breaks at any time for any reason.
  • Each student gets three bathroom passes per semester. Beyond three is an automatic deduction in points. One bathroom pass is issued at a time for the class.

Basic Class Rules
 

  • Keep hands, feet, and mouth to yourself
  • Refrain from talking while instructor has the floor
  • Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated
  • Give each assignment your full attention and stay on task
  • Be on time and ready to work
  • No electronics of any kind

Electronics Continued
 

  • 1st offense – Verbal warning
  • 2nd offense- Cell phone is taken and placed in cell block until the end of class, with a one page write explaining the infraction. Also results in automatic deduction of points.
  • 3rd offense- Cell phone is taken, placed in cell block until end of class, results in a two page write explaining the infraction. Also results in automatic deduction of points and a call home.
  • 4th offense - Cell phone is taken; a one page write is assigned for you to explain the infraction and your 3 prior offenses. If a situation can’t be resolved, then the matter will result in a meeting with the principal.

Attendance

***15 minutes late to class is an absence***

Days Absent
(per 6 week marking period)

  Grade
(35% max)
0 30-35% A
1 25-29% A-
2 15-24% B
3  5-14% C
4 0-4% D to E

 

Note: an absence will automatically be taken at the lowest range. Ex- If you're absent one day, you will be marked at 25% as you are unemployable as a no call/no show. The way to get to the high end of the range is to display the good work habit of calling or e-mailing me in advance. A call from someone other than you gets you no points, but it’s always nice to hear from them.

 

Student Initials: __________

Tests and Quizzes

If absent the day of test, and have called me ahead of time, you are required to take the test the following day. You are responsible for asking me for the test when you return. Failure to call results in a 0 for the test and failure to take the test the following day results in a 0.

Unemployment

If showing habitual unsafe practices and disregard for classroom policies, you will no longer have the privilege of working in the shop environment for the semester. You will collect your work experience from the corresponding chapter in our course textbook.

Segments Covered
 

  • Segment 1: Safety, Health, and Environmental
  • Segment 2: Industry Overview
  • Segment 3: Employability and Technical Skills
  • Segment 4: Construction Materials
  • Segment 5: Construction Tools and Equipment
  • Segment 6: Building Construction Design Blueprint, etc.
  • Segment 7: Site Preparation and Infrastructure
  • Segment 8: Common Construction Practices, Concepts, Flooring, Foundations etc.
  • Segment 9: Residential Construction Techniques (Carpentry)
  • Segment 10: Green Technology Construction Techniques
  • Segment 11: Heavy Equipment / Civil Construction Techniques    
  • Segment 12: Construction Business Management

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan.  In order to qualify for college credits, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology.  In addition, you must attend Construction Technology for 2 years.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

I have read and understanding the classroom policies for Construction Technology 1. Please sign and date below and return to instructor.

 

Student Signature __________________________

 

Date ________________

 

Parent Signature ___________________________

 

Date ________________

 

Construction Technology II Syllabus

Construction Technology II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

I. IDENTIFYING INFORMATION

CIP Number: 46.0000
Course Number: YR2 V0620
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times: Monday – Friday
7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm
Prerequisites: Construction Technology I

Instructor: Michael Koelzer
Phone Number: (734) 419-2141
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127
Email: koelzerm@wwcsd.net

Web Site: www.wwcsd.net

Credit: This class meets either the Senior Year Math Related Credit or The Visual, Performing and Applied Arts Credit requirement for graduation.

This is a one year class.  1.5 credits per semester.

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Textbooks

Title: Carpentry Residential Construction Academy
Publisher: Thomson Delmar Learning
Required: Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students must purchase: Tool belt, framing hammer, cat’s paw, speed square, tape measure, utility knife, chalk line, work boots

Skills USA

Skills USA is a student-led organization.  Students have the option to participate in competitions.

III. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Construction Technology II (On-Site)

Prerequisite:  Certificate of Completion from Construction Technology I (In-School) and/or instructor’s recommendation.  This is the real deal.  In this program students actually build a residential home from the ground up or completely renovate an existing home.  Students are responsible for every aspect of the construction of this home.  The class is structured so the students are on site every day to develop the skills needed to be effective in any trade associated with construction.  Through the course of the school year students are trained as estimators and work in every trade that is used to build or renovate a home.  The trades include; rough carpentry, trim carpentry, plumbing, HVAC, electric, dry wall, masonry, cement flat-work, roofing, various types of siding and flooring.  After completing this program many students continue their education in construction and take the State of Michigan Residential Contractors Licensing exam.  Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

TECH Prep College Information:

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan.  In order to qualify for college credits at the colleges listed below, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology.  In addition, you must be accepted into the college list below and attend Construction Technology for 2 years. Please contact your advisor at the attending college for articulation paperwork.

  • Ferris State University
  • Henry Ford Community College
  • Washtenaw Community College
  • Wayne County Community College
  • Davenport University

IV. COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Construction Technology II: Segment Q:

The second year of the program is devoted entirely to segment Q.  During this time the students build an entire home from the ground up.  This project is completed in partnership with the City of Westland Community Development department and utilizes federal home funds.

Standards:
 

  1. Safety
    1. Students will earn 10 hour OSHA Safety Card
  2. Foundation
    1. Students will be able to identify parts of a foundation and explain the process of constructing.  
    2. Students will be able to explain how to make foundation energy efficient.
  3. Floor Framing
    1. Students will be able to interpret blueprints to layout and install entire floor system.
  4. Wall Framing
    1. Students will be able to interpret blueprints to layout and install interior and exterior walls.
    2. Students will be able to identify and explain green building techniques used in wall construction.
  5. Roof Framing
    1. Students will be able to interpret truss layout and install entire truss package.
    2. Students will be able to build scaffolding and demonstrate safe elevated work practices.
  6. Shingle Installation
    1. Students will be able to install architectural shingles on a roof system, utilizing ice guard, tar paper, ridge vent, step flashing, and valley flashing
  7. Insulation
    1. Students will be able to insulate a home to meet current codes.
    2. Students will be able to blow insulation into an attic space to increase R-Value to the current code.
  8. Drywall
    1. Students will be able to hang drywall on walls and ceilings.
  9. Trim/Flooring
    1. Students will be able to hang and trim a pre-hung door, bi-fold door, and pocket door.
    2. Students will be able to install baseboard moldings, window sills, aprons, and casing.
    3. Students will be able to install kitchen and bath cabinets.
  10. Paint
    1. Students will be able to operate an airless sprayer to spray and back roll walls and ceilings.
    2. Students will be able to identify the differences in paint types and sheens.
  11. Siding
    1. Students will be able to install vinyl siding and accessories.
    2. Students will be able to bend all aluminum trim coverings with an aluminum break and install.

V. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

Grading Policy

Grading Framework:

  1. Tests/Homework = 33.3%
  2. Employability/Leadership = 33.3%
  3. Performance = 33.3%

Grade Distribution:

98-100%     = A+
94-97%    = A
90-93%     = A-
87-89%     = B+
84-86%     = B
80 –83%     = B-
77-79%     = C+        
74-76%     = C
70-73%     = C-
67-69%     = D+
64 -66 %     = D
60 = 63%     = D-
0 – 59         = E

Homework/Paperwork

Homework may be assigned in conjunction with the various stages of construction on the home project.  It will be due upon the assigned due date or the student will not be able to join the team on the construction site.  If a situation arises that the student does not complete his/her assignment he/she will be required to stay at the Center to complete the assigned homework.  There will always be at least a three day notice before the assignment due date.  The grade reduction for a late assignment is 50 percent.  Work must be complete to receive a grade.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Employability

Attendance is crucial.  No one can learn how to build a home by not showing up.  Also the class/building project is based around teamwork and when you’re not present you only hurt the team.

Students are expected to be in class before the class starts 7:25 am and 11:10 am.  This is very important especially since we have to take a bus to the site every day.  If the student is later he/she will miss the bus.  Any student late enough to miss the bus to the job site is considered to be absent for the day and cannot earn points.  School transportation issues will be considered to be exceptions.

Performance

Each day is worth one fifth of the student’s weekly grade.  This is recorded by the student’s journal, attendance, and Mr. Koelzer’s observations.  After review of the logs and the weekly assessment the instructor will discuss the weekly grade with student.  The total worth or each week is figured the same as homework resulting in 33.3% of the semester grade.

Performance and employability measures all skills.  The student must be a team player use proper language, be on time, work steadily and efficiently, respect others and their property etc.

Notes:

  1. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  This is professional and helps the instructor prepare for class since there is a lot of teamwork and partnering in the building process.
  2. If is the student’s responsibility to find out what they have missed while absent.
  3. A tardy that is more than 15 minutes is considered an absence.

Certificate of Program Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with more than 25 absences in the school year.  This includes suspensions but not school related absences.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

 

I have read and understand the Construction Technology II Grading Policy

 

Student Signature  _____________________________________________ 

 

Date___________________

 

Student E-mail Address: ________________________________________________________


 

Parent/Guardian Signature _____________________________________________

 

 Date___________________

 

Parent E-mail Address: _________________________________________________________

 

If you have any questions please contact Mr. Koelzer at 734.419.2100

 

Culinary Arts and Hospitality I & II

Culinary Arts and Hospitality I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program prepares students for occupations in the hospitality industry. Learning includes both classroom and laboratory work. The classroom work is designed to teach basic and advanced techniques and procedures used in commercial food service. The CORE information on travel, tourism and lodging industries is also taught.

The laboratory work is used to teach the functions of the commercial kitchen, short order cooking and dining room service. The labs are divided into workstations. The students will operate many pieces of equipment including convection ovens, slicers, fryers and griddles, as well as a touch screen POS dining room system. They will prepare food for the Cafe’ Marquette, a public restaurant and The Food Shop, a student restaurant.

Culinary Arts and Hospitality II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Culinary Arts and Hospitality I and instructor's recommendation.

This program offers the student an opportunity to improve performance objectives, specialize in specific advanced skill areas and gain limited management experience.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught: 
 

  • Food service safety
  • Sanitation and food-borne illnesses
  • Tools and equipment utilization
  • Measures and portion control
  • Terminology/ingredient identification
  • Standardized recipes
  • Pantry functions
  • Hot food functions/buffet
  • Bake shop functions
  • Short order cooking
  • Garde manger
  • Ice carving
  • Gourmet/classical/international cookery
  • Advanced cake decorating

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Convection oven
  • Deck oven
  • Food processor
  • Broiler/griddle/fryer
  • Pressure fryer/steamer
  • Slicer
  • Automatic dish machine
  • Dutchess dough cutter
  • Sheeter
  • Meat grinder
  • Touch screen
  • POS restaurant system
  • Dell Pentium computers
  • Rack Oven
  • Dough Mixers

Occupational Options:
 

  • Foods/Cook
  • Short Order Cook
  • Pantry Goods Maker
  • Pastry Helper
  • Cook Helper
  • Waiter/Waitress
  • Cashier
  • Dining Room Attendant
  • Kitchen Helper
  • Baker Helper
  • Lodging
  • Travel/Tourism

 

Culinary Arts I Syllabus

Culinary Arts/Hospitality I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Course Information

Instructor: Chef Anthony Paquette
Room: 103
Phone: (734) 419-2132
Email: paquettea@wwcsd.net

Course Description

Culinary Arts/Hospitality provides an overviews of the fundamentals of the culinary arts/hospitality profession. Principles and practices necessary to food, supply, and equipment selection, receiving, storage, and distribution are introduced. Students are taught safety and sanitation for preparation of food in a commercial kitchen. Topics include dining room hospitality, customer service, skills necessary in a fast food establishment, knife skills, food preparation, banquet service, prix fixe, baking, pastries, dishwashing, pot/sink, cuisine, food service organizations, career opportunities, food service styles, basic culinary management techniques, professionalism, culinary work ethics, quality factors, and food tests. Class will include classroom work, written tests, kitchen demonstrations, food preparation tests and student experimentation parallel to class work.

Competency Areas:     

Hospitality Core
Basic Food Service Tasks
Food Preparation/Pantry Goods Maker
Cook Helper
Baker/Pastry 1 and 2
Short Order Cook
Safety and Sanitation

Segments:
 

  1. Cost control & Culinary Math
  2. Culinary Core
  3. ServSafe & Sanitation
  4. Guest Relations
  5. Basic Cooking
  6. Baking & Pastry
  7. Management
  8. Marketing & Entrepreneurship
  9. Advanced Cooking
  10. Garde Manager
  11. Sustainability & Nutrition
  12. Career & Professional Development

Textbook: ProStart Year 1 and 2 (2014)

Assessment:        

Daily Participation
Test/Quizzes
Workbook/Chapters: 87%
Final Exam: 13%

Grading Scale:

A+    97-100
A    94-96
A-    90-93
B+    87-89
B    84-86
B-    80-83
C+    77-79
C    74-76
C-    70-73
D+    67-69
D    64-66
D-    60-63
E    59 and below

Competency Certificate:    

List of competencies achieved

Certificate of Completion (with 70% or higher of skills at Level 2)
Certificate of Completion - Excellence (with 80% or higher of skills     at Level 2)

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Classroom Policies

Attendance: Attendance is extremely important for success in this course, you can only learn if you are present. Attendance will be checked at the start of each class period.    

Tardiness: Tardiness is disruptive, unfair to, and inconsiderate of others. It can develop into a bad habit that could ultimately cost you a job! If you come in late, it is your responsibility to see that your absence is changed to a tardy. Three (3) tardies equals one (1) absence for the course. Tardy means arriving after the scheduled time for instruction to begin or departing before the end of the scheduled time. Leaving the kitchen area or classroom without the instructor’s permission will count as an early departure. If you need to leave the kitchen area or classroom for any reason, notify your instructor prior to leaving.

Late Work: The instructor expects all assignments and work to be handed in on time as scheduled. You are provided ample time to complete your work and assignments, therefore the instructor will not accept late work or assignments. If you are absent for a quiz, test, or exam, you must bring documentation for the absence before the instructor will allow you to make it up. Each day you wait to make up the quiz, test, or exam, the instructor will deduct 5 points off the grade.

Extra Credit: Extra credit is given to students that go above and beyond the daily expectations.

Cheating/Plagiarism: Academic honesty is expected at all times. Any student found to have engaged in academic misconduct such as cheating, plagiarism, or collusion is subject to disciplinary sanctions as outlined in the student code of conduct detailed in the William D. Ford Career Technical Center Student Handbook. The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. The term “collusion” includes, but is not limited to, the unauthorized collaboration with any other person in preparing work offered for academic credit.

General Policies: Cell Phones are not to be used during class/kitchen time. This includes any type of ear buds, radio, music, Bluetooth devices, etc.

Keep work area and classroom clean.

All students need to be dressed in complete uniform at the start of each class. Complete uniform consists of chef jacket (white or black jacket), chef pants (checks or black), chef hat, apron, and closed-toed protective shoes. All uniforms must be clean and free of debris. Students that violate the uniform policy will not be permitted into the kitchen but will have alternative academic assignments in the classroom.

Food and beverages are allowed in the classroom only. No food or beverages are allowed in the kitchen or service area with the exception of food that is being prepared and evaluated for instructional purposes.

Food, beverages and supplies that will be consumed/used by students, must be paid for at the time of receipt. This includes any product purchased from Skills Grill, Cafe Marquette buffet, pop, juice, milk, “to-go” containers, cups, straws, lids, napkins, utensils, etc.

Stealing: Refer to William D. Ford Career Technical Center Student Handbook.

Sexual Harassment: Refer to William D. Ford Career Technical Center Student Handbook.

 

Culinary Arts II Syllabus

Culinary Arts/Hospitality II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Course Information

Instructor: Chef Anthony Paquette
Room: 103
Phone: (734) 419-2132
Email: paquettea@wwcsd.net

Segment Q

Cooking and Related Culinary Arts II: 1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Cooking and Related Culinary Arts I and instructor's recommendation

Cooking and Related Culinary Arts II is a continuation of Culinary Arts I. This course offers the student an opportunity to improve performance objectives, specialize in specific advanced skill areas and gain limited management experience.

Due to the Center's Tech Prep relationship with nearby community colleges, those students successfully completing this program may earn college credit for culinary skills learned at the Center.

Segment Q Standards:
 

  • Considers the environmental, social, and economic impacts of decisions
  • Leads and manages small teams
  • Organizes and prepares catering logistics
  • Demonstrates the use of technology to enhance productivity
  • Creates menu and includes nutritional information
  • "Recognize, explain and provide meal suggestions for cultural (e.g. Halal, Kosher) and medical (e.g. Celiac, Diabetic) dietary restrictions."
  • Independently create and execute a meal and its service
  • Conduct a demonstration for first year students
  • Identify the purpose and impact of food-related safety recalls.
  • Independently execute a given recipe successfully.
  • Explain portfolio with recipe to current year 1 students

Specialized Equipment:

 

  • Rotary bake oven
  • Convection oven
  • Food Processor
  • Broiler/griddle/fryer
  • Pressure fryer/steamer
  • Slicer
  • Commercial Mixers
  • Automatic Dish Machine
  • Meat grinder
  • Touch screen POS restaurant system


Occupational Options:

Foods

 

  • Cook
  • Short order cook
  • Pantry goods maker
  • Pastry helper
  • Cook helper
  • Waiter/waitress
  • Cashier
  • Dining room attendant
  • Kitchen helper
  • Baker helper
  • Conference service attendant

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Assessment:        

Daily Participation
Test/Quizzes
Workbook/Chapters: 87%
Final Exam: 13%

Grading Scale:    

A+    97-100
A    94-96
A-    90-93
B+    87-89
B    84-86
B-    80-83
C+    77-79
C    74-76
C-    70-73
D+    67-69
D    64-66
D-    60-63
E    59 and below

Competency Certificate:    

List of competencies achieved:

Certificate of Completion (with 70% or higher of skills at Level 2)
Certificate of Completion - Excellence (with 80% or higher of skills     at Level 2)

 

Digital Media Technology I & II

Digital Media Technology I:

1 year – 3 credits

 

Students will investigate the history, technology, and modern day implications of mass media with an emphasis on video production for film, broadcast journalism, and marketing. Students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production. Students work with cinema cameras, audio, and lighting equipment. Students learn how to record video, capture audio, build sets, color correct, color grade, equalize audio, sequence shots, schedule shoots, create special effects, produce music for film soundtracks/scores, and scout locations. In addition, students acquire the following skills: script writing, storyboarding, and acting for the camera.

Digital Media Technology II:

1 year – 3 credits

 

Prerequisite:  Certificate of Completion from Digital Media Technology I and instructor’s recommendation.

This course is a continuation of Digital Media Technology I, and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on independent study projects facilitated by the instructor. Students focus on compiling finished polished projects for a professional portfolio. Students also have the opportunity to work on competitions for scholarships, film festival projects, district-wide media projects and client projects.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Lighting
  • Camera operation
  • Editing video/photography
  • Producing
  • Directing
  • Acting
  • Script writing
  • Storyboarding
  • Motion graphics
  • Special effects
  • Sound editing
  • Sound capture
  • Color correction/color grading
  • Portfolio preparation

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Mac Pro
  • Canon D-SLR cameras
  • Rokinon cinema lenses
  • Sigma art lenses
  • Electronic strobe kits
  • Audio production studio
  • Audio mixers/mics
  • Industry standard lighting equipment
  • Two film studios
  • Green/blue screens
  • Professional camera stabilizers
  • Adobe Premiere Pro CC
  • Adobe After Effects CC
  • Adobe Photoshop CC
  • Adobe Lightroom CC
  • Adobe Audition CC
  • Ableton
  • Garage Band
  • Celtx
  • Google Docs

Occupational Options:
 

  • Director
  • Producer
  • Cinematographer
  • Video Editor
  • Actor
  • Gaffer
  • Art Director
  • Storyboard Artist
  • Sound Designer
  • Music Supervisor
  • Sound Editor
  • Makeup Artist
  • Costume Designer
  • Reporter
  • Colorist
  • Animator
  • Videographer

Digital Media I Technology Syllabus

Digital Media Technology I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 10.0202 - Radio & TV Broadcasting
Course Number: V3220 Digital Media Technology

Office Hours:
Shift 1: 7:25 AM - 10:05 AM    Monday – Friday
Shift 2: 11:10 AM - 1:50 PM    Monday – Friday

Instructor: Ashley Teffer

Course Description:

In Digital Media students will investigate the history, technology, and modern day implications of mass media with an emphasis on video production for film, broadcast journalism, and marketing.

Photography:

Students will experience working with professional D-SLR cameras and gain competencies in Adobe Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC. Students learn how to set up shoots and create photos for a professional portfolio. This includes necessary retouching, studio lighting, and photography composition utilizing the principles of design.

Video:

Students gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production. Students will experience working with cinema cameras, professional audio equipment, and lighting equipment. Students will also learn how to record video, capture professional audio, build sets, create special effects, producing music for film soundtracks/scores, scout locations, and edit video using Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe After Effects. In addition, students acquire the following skills: script writing, storyboarding, and acting for the camera.

This class meets either the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT or the VISUAL, PERFORMING OR APPLIED ARTS CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Segments:
 

  1. Mass-Media’s Effect on Society - History
  2. Pre-Production I
  3. Ethics & Legal Responsibility
  4. Production I
  5. Post-Production I
  6. Digital Media
  7. Current & Emerging Technology
  8. Broadcast Journalism & Communication
  9. Pre-Production II
  10. Production II
  11. Post-Production II
  12. Employability and Career Development

Equipment:
 

  • 2014 iMac Computer LabD-SLR Cameras
  • Professional RAW Video Cameras
  • Professional Audio Equipment
  • Audio Production Studio
  • Professional Lighting Equipment
  • 2 Film Studios
  • Green Screen

Software:

Full Adobe Creative Cloud Suite

Employability, Attendance, & Work Logs:

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 10 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property, eating food or drink in the facilities, and being disrespectful to Ms. Teffer. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for notifying the instructor in advance). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Projects & Handouts:

Each assignment has a grading rubric and an explanation on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Tests and Quizzes:

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called
the instructor or parent has called the instructor) he/
she is required to take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Work Habits:

It is important for all students to develop a good work ethic. Therefore, students will be evaluated on performance, work habits, jog readiness, job cleanup, proper use of time and classroom behavior. These points will be reflected in the student’s points for the day within their log sheets.

Digital Media students may not bring in other students from another classroom or school unless the instructor grants permission. Cell phones, I-Pods, lasers, portable games, or any other electronic devices are not permitted in the Digital Media facilities.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time maybe permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

NO FOOD ALLOWED IN STUDIOS OR CLASSROOM.  ONLY DRINKS WITH LIDS ALLOWED IN FACILITIES.  Let’s have some fun! Respect your classmates, the equipment, the facilities, and Ms. Teffer. We are going to create some AMAZING projects this year! Don’t let your attitude, petty drama, or nonsense get in the way! Remember in this room you are part of a TEAM and you must work together. If someone falls, help pick them up! If someone doesn’t understand something, or is confused, give them clarity!  Stay POSITIVE and remember: If you can script it, visualize it, and plan it, we WILL create it.

 

 

Digital Media II Technology Syllabus

Digital Media Technology II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Segment Q (2nd year in Program)

Prerequisite:        Digital Media Technology I

CIP: 10.0202 – Radio & TV Broadcasting
Course Number: V3230 Digital Media Technology II

Instructor: Ashley Teffer

Office Hours: 
Shift 1:    7:25 AM - 10:05 AM    Monday – Friday
Shift 2:    11:10 AM - 1:50 PM    Monday – Friday

Course Description:

Digital Media II

This course is a continuation of Digital Media Technology I, and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on projects facilitated by the instructor at an advanced level. Students focus on compiling finished polished projects for a professional portfolio. Students also have the opportunity to work on district-wide media projects and client projects.

This class meets either the FINAL YEAR MATH RELATED CREDIT or the VISUAL, PERFORMING OR APPLIED ARTS CREDIT requirement for graduation.

Segment Q Standards:
 

  1. Using information from clients; assess, develop and create client-driven content.
  2. Complete a professional portfolio that will be shown to potential job placements.
  3. Write a screenplay for large-scale production.
  4. Demonstrate a specialized area of production.
  5. Schedule a production independently.
  6. Analyze and interpret fundamentals of motion pictures.
  7. Evaluate software and select software based on production needs.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of Radio, TV, Film by critically analyzing one’s own work and the work of others.
  9. Apply media writing and production techniques to create original projects.
  10. Describe and analyze elements in the production process.
  11. Compare the production process for radio, television, film and online content.

Equipment:
 

  • 2014 iMac Computer Lab
  • D-SLR Cameras
  • Professional RAW Video Cameras
  • Professional Audio Equipment
  • Audio Production Studio
  • Professional Lighting Equipment
  • 2 Film Studios
  • Green Screen

Software:

Full Adobe Creative Cloud Suite

Employability, Attendance, & Work Logs:

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 10 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property, eating food or drink in the facilities, and being disrespectful to Ms. Teffer. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for notifying the instructor in advance). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Projects & Handouts:

Each assignment has a grading rubric and an explanation on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Tests and Quizzes:

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called
the instructor or parent has called the instructor) he/
she is required to take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Work Habits:

It is important for all students to develop a good work ethic. Therefore, students will be evaluated on performance, work habits, jog readiness, job cleanup, proper use of time and classroom behavior. These points will be reflected in the student’s points for the day within their log sheets.

Digital Media students may not bring in other students from another classroom or school unless the instructor grants permission. Cell phones, I-Pods, lasers, portable games, or any other electronic devices are not permitted in the Digital Media facilities. NO FOOD OR DRINK ALLOWED.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time maybe permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Let’s have some fun!

Respect your classmates, the equipment, the facilities, and Ms. Teffer. We are going to create some AMAZING projects this year! Don’t let your attitude, petty drama, or nonsense get in the way! Remember in this room you are part of a TEAM and you must work together. If someone falls, help pick them up! If someone doesn’t understand something, or is confused, give them clarity! Stay POSITIVE and remember: If you can script it, visualize it, and plan it, we WILL create it.

 

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I & II

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the field of early childhood education as well as provide an understanding and appreciation of all young children. Students study growth and development of 3-5 year olds as well as elementary age, learn how to plan developmentally appropriate activities for children, study behavior and behavior management, and learn other work related skills. The students participate three days a week as classroom assistants in our State Licensed, Sunshine and Rainbows Preschool. The students are activity leaders, learning techniques of teamwork, leadership, and participation. Career exploration and employment opportunities are also studied as part of the core curriculum. Two work experiences are implemented during the year to provide students with insights about working in the “Real World”.

Early Childhood/Teacher Education II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Early Childhood/Teacher Education I and Instructor’s recommendation.

Students continue their study in growth and development including infant through school age. The students in Early Childhood/Teacher Education II act as team leaders to the first year students. The students participate three days a week as classroom assistants and activity leaders in the on-site lab. Two or more work experiences are implemented during the year as well as having the opportunity to work in the co-op program.

The students in both programs also work on a job related portfolio detailing the experiences and accomplishments in Early Childhood/Teacher Education. Additional experiences may include Co-op, internships and SkillsUSA.

Student who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Lesson planning/preparation
  • Classroom management
  • Guidance techniques
  • Observation/recording/assessing
  • Team skills/cooperation
  • Written/verbal communication skills
  • Nutrition/menu planning

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Child sized furniture
  • Developmental learning materials for: creativity, intellectual development, social skills, large and fine motor skills, and outdoor play
  • CD’s and CD players
  • Observation booth
  • Outdoor play equipment
  • Full size kitchen and equipment
  • Computers
  • Projector
  • iPad and speaker/docking station

Occupational Options:
 

  • Early Childhood Teacher
  • Elementary School Teacher
  • Middle School Teacher
  • High School Teacher
  • College/University Faculty
  • Pre-Primary Impaired Teacher
  • Special Education Teacher
  • School Administrator
  • Religious Educator
  • Corporate Trainer
  • Speech Therapist
  • School Psychologist
  • School Social Worker
  • School Nurse
  • School Counselor
  • Occupational Therapist

 

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I Syllabus

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 13.000    PSN 19912
Course number:
V7410    1 Year 3 credits
V7410M-1    1 Year 2 credits
(plus Extended Algebra II)

Can receive also 4th yr. Math, VPAA, World Language, Science Credit

Instructor/Director: Tracy Vaughan
Teaching Assistants: Barbara Moore and Gail Kennedy

Time: Monday-Friday
1st shift    7:25 Am - 10:05 Am
2nd shift    11:10 Am - 1:50 Pm

Location:  Wayne-Westland Educational Center
Lab: Sunshine & Rainbows Preschool

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The Early Childhood/Teacher Education I Program is a two semester block class.  In the first marking period the curriculum deals with instruction in the growth and development of young children and an introduction to Early Childhood/Teacher Education and Careers.

The laboratory section of the program, Sunshine & Rainbows Preschool, begins with the arrival of the preschool children in October.  Students must successfully complete the academic portion of the class before working with the children.  During the second semester, students complete leader and team member competencies as well as internship experiences at an off-site location.

This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the field of early childhood education and teaching as well as provide an understanding and appreciation of all children.  Students continue to study growth and development of children, learn how to plan appropriate activities for the children, study behavior and behavior management, and learn other work related and teaching skills.

In the on-site lab, which is a state licensed center, Sunshine & Rainbows Preschool, students participate three days a week as classroom assistants and activity leaders.  Students learn techniques of teamwork, leadership and participation, career exploration and employment opportunities are studied as part of the core curriculum.   Two work experiences are implemented during the year to provide student with insights about working in the "Real World".  All specific skills taught are listed in the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Performance Objectives.

The Early Childhood/Teacher Education II is for the returning second year students to gain additional knowledge designed to prepare them for the field of teaching and other related occupations.

Course Objectives-Segments
 

  1. Employability Skills and Career Planning - 2nd semester
  2. Human Growth and Development - 1st semester
  3. Communication and Collaboration - 1st semester
  4. Diversity - 1st semester
  5. Classroom Management and Guidance - 1st semester
  6. Applied Learning and Field Experience - 2nd semester
  7. Health and Safety - 1st semester
  8. Learning Environment and Climate - 1st semester
  9. Ethics and Professional Responsibility - 1st semester
  10. Systems and Legal Issues - 2nd semester
  11. Instructional Strategy/Technology - 2nd semester
  12. Curriculum Planning and Assessment - 2nd semester

Early Childhood/Teacher Education I Overview

The Early Childhood/Teacher Education I class consist of: An academic component- lecture, class assignments, hands on workshops, test and quizzes, and a laboratory component in which we run an on-site licensed preschool three days a week, Wednesday thru Friday for children between the ages of 3 and 5 as well as an internship/job shadowing experience.

Book:   Working with Young Children-Judy Herr, Glencoe 7th Edition (2012)

September-October

  • Student paperwork-health forms, DHS clearance, child abuse forms, student info papers, safety forms
  • Bulletin boards - notes, planning, preparation, quiz
  • Modern & Traditional Manuscript
  • Part One - The Children and You
  • Part Two - Creating a Safe and Healthful Environment
  • Blood Borne Pathogens & First Aide/CPR/AED
  • Part Three - Guiding Children
  • Part Four - Learning Experiences for Children: Teaching & Learning, Art Activities, Language Activities, Dramatic Play Activities, Social Studies Activities, Music & Movement Activities, Science & Math Activities, Activities for Active Play
  • Part Five - Other People You Will Meet
  • Career Ready 101/Career Cruising

October-May

  • Lesson Planning and Preparation for Preschool Lab- Science, Math, Computers, Sensory, Blocks, Dramatic Play, Snacks, Active Play, Finger plays/Songs, Large Group, Art, Easel, Cut & Paste, Toyshop (Manipulative), Language Arts/Social Studies, Small group Activities.
  • Activity Notebook - Flannel Board Activities, Math Activities, Science Activities, File folder Games, Art Activities, Cut & Paste Activities, Language Arts Activities, Manipulative Activities, Same & Different, Finger plays, Social Studies & Multicultural Activities, Large group Activities, Large Motor Activities, Puppets
  • Preschool Child Observation Notebooks
  • Evaluation of progress of preschool children
  • Preschooler Portfolios
  • Teamwork/Leadership Skills
  • Performance in preschool setting
  • Supervision for Field Trips/Outdoor Play
  • Career Ready 101/Career Cruising

May-June

  • Internship/Job Shadowing Experience- Preschool/ Head Start / Kindergarten through Fourth Grade /Early Intervention Programs
  • Career Cruising, Career Ready 101
  • Student Job Portfolio

Certificates That May Be Awarded

Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement - awarded to those students that complete a full year of the program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Certificate of Completion - awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies completed at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Post-Secondary Articulated Credits

Students may be eligible to receive free college credits for WDFCTC courses they successfully complete.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available will vary by the program and college with which it is affiliated.

End of Program Assessment Exam

There is a mandatory end of program assessment, required by the State of Michigan. The Professional Readiness Exam or The MME ACT WorkKeys Exam are acceptable assessments.

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

Participants in the program MUST have on file before they can work with the children:

A physical exam with a doctor's signature showing that they are in good health and able to work in a Child Care center.

Negative TB test result (also signed by a doctor's office) as well as all immunizations completed according to the Dept. Human Services Licensing Rules for Child Care Centers.

According to the State of Michigan Licensing Rules for a Licensed Child Care Center.

R 400.5112 Health of personnel; report, Rule 112.

(1) A center shall have on file a report, signed by a licensed physician for each staff member and each volunteer who has contact with children 4 hrs. or more per week for more than two consecutive weeks.  This report shall declare, to the best of the physician's knowledge, the physical capability of the staff member to perform the duties required.  The report shall be signed no more than 6 months prior to, or 30 days after, the start of employment and every 2 years thereafter.

(2) A center shall have on file evidence that each staff member and each volunteer who has contact with children 4 hrs. or more a week for more than 2 consecutive weeks is free from communicable tuberculosis, verified within 2 years before employment and every 2 years thereafter.

Any Volunteer working with children will need clearance by the Department of Human Services (DHS), formally the Family Independent Agency, for:

Possible child abuse convictions and will also need to sign forms stating that they have never been convicted of child abuse to be kept on file for each person working with the preschool children according to State Licensing.  A Student may also be screened for any criminal background using I-Chat dependent on age.

GRADING POLICY

Grades are awarded for academic achievements and performance of duties in the preschool setting.  Course work during the 1st semester is equally divided between academic work and performance of assigned duties.  During the 2nd semester, performance will account for more of a student's final grade.  A participant's ability to function as a member of a cooperating team and to demonstrate excellent work habits and attendance forms an integral part of each evaluation.  Professional attitudes toward work, mature behavior as well as being good role models for young children are essential of successful completion of the Early Childhood/Teacher Education program.  In addition, future success on the job and the ability to qualify for promotions in the future are dependent on excellent work habits.

Grading System

Academic Component:  Grades are earned by successful completion of assigned work, quizzes and tests.

Preschool Laboratory Component:  Grades are based upon successful performance of tasks and completion of forms used for preschool records.  Grades are awarded for each session and final grades for preschool performance are also based on numbers of days in attendance/number of actual preschool days scheduled.

All work is given a point value and those points will be used to calculate the overall percentage for marking period and semester grades.

The grading scale is as follows:

90-100%        A
80-89%        B
70-79%        C
60-69%        D
0 –59%        E

Evaluation

Evaluation on academic and laboratory (preschool) performance is computed on a scale, which awards increasing value to student's ability to work effectively with preschoolers in a classroom setting.  Quizzes, written / practical examinations are scheduled periodically throughout the course.  Written examinations include multiple choice, true false, completion and essay questions.  Students earn a performance grade for being present and completing the assigned tasks on preschool days.   Students cannot receive credit if they are not in attendance.  Therefore, good attendance is critical. Evaluation of students on internship is assessed through their attendance and completion of work done by students.   Student’s performance is discussed with them on a daily/weekly basis as necessary to his/her successful performance of tasks.

CLASSROOM POLICIES

Student Conduct

The student will observe common rules of courtesy by:

Showing respect for others, including: staff members, classmates, preschoolers, preschool parents, and guests.

Using classroom property and equipment properly. (Any abuse of equipment will result in disciplinary action.)

The student will demonstrate a positive work attitude by:

Arriving on time.  The ECTE program follows the tardy policy as presented in the student handbook.  Detentions for accumulated tardies are held at the student’s home school. More than 30 minutes late for class will be considered an absence.

Calling in absences:

Absences MUST be called in to the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Office - phone # (734) 419-2113 BEFORE the start of your shift.  This number has a voice mail and you may leave a message.  Students who fail to notify us of their absence may receive a zero for the Day’s employee/participation; however, if the ECTE office is notified a student will be excused for the employee/participation portion of the day.  Frequent absences will affect your grade, as you will fall behind in class work, lab work, and will miss valuable hands-on experiences.

Doing your own work.  Do not allow others to copy your work or both parties will receive no grade.

Arriving prepared for the activities of the day, i.e. planning done, projects prepared, etc.

Turning in assignments.  Each class will have a TURN IN FOLDER for assignments.  Late assignments may be reduced one letter grade each day late, after     FOUR days the assignment will receive a zero and will not be accepted.

Remaining in their assigned work areas during class time. Students are to remain in class until dismissed by the instructor.  Equipment, books, etc. must be put away before leaving class.

Assignments and Tests

If you are absent, it is your responsibility to check for missed assignments, tests, and lab sessions.

Previous days assignments can be found in the assignment bin in the classroom.

Assignments, tests or quizzes that are taken home, must be turned in the following day to receive credit.  NO EXCEPTIONS!

Arrangements must be made in order to make up missing quizzes or tests.

You will be expected to come to class prepared.  This means that you will have a writing utensil, your notebook, and any work that may be due.

Each class has a folder in the room where they are to turn in work.  When a student competes an assignment he/she is to put the assignment into the TURN IN FOLDER to be graded.

Graded and recorded assignments will be returned in the student’s mailbox.  These should be put into your Early Childhood/Teacher Education Notebook.

The color the AM class is YELLOW.

The color the PM class is BLUE.

Assignment Notebook

You will be provided with a three ring binder to organize all classwork, quizzes, tests and handouts.  This material will be used on the final exam and it is the student’s best interest to keep the notebook up to date and organized.

Each student will keep track of the assignments on their own personal assignment sheet. It is important to keep this up to date.

Activity Notebook

An activity notebook will be collected during the 2nd semester marking periods.  Each notebook will consist of various lesson plans for activities which can be used with young children.

The activity notebooks need to be organized so that the activities are easily found. A notebook with activities dumped in it will not be graded.

Activity notebooks are to be turned in ON/OR BEFORE THE DUE DATE.  Late notebooks may not be accepted.

Final Project-ECTE I

Each student will plan for one preschool day.  He/she will be given a theme around which to plan.  It will be the student's responsibility to plan for all of the activities for that day.  The student's plan will be put into action during the second semester.

Portfolio

Each student will complete a job portfolio as a part of the requirements for the second semester.

The portfolio will include a resume, autobiography, responses for job interview questions, their job task descriptions, and samples of their best work in ECTE.

The portfolio should also include pictures taken throughout the school year of preschool sessions and field trips.  Bringing a camera to school and taking pictures throughout the year is encouraged.

The student will follow the Rules of Conduct of the William D. Ford Career Technical Center and the Wayne/Westland School District:

Because teamwork, positive attitudes, initiative and effort, along with cooperation and efficiency are so important in acquiring and keeping a job, this year focuses on these skills.

Failure to adhere to these expectations may result in discipline ranging for student/teacher conferences to administration referrals.

Book Policy

A classroom textbook(s) will be issued to each student.  The student will be responsible for the care and return of the book issued to them.  If the textbook is not returned or returned in poor condition/damaged when the student leaves the ECTE Program, the student will be responsible for the cost of replacing the textbook.  Also students will be responsible for any materials used during the course of the ECTE Program, if these materials are lost, or damaged the student will be responsible for cost of replacing the item.

DRESS CODE

Professionalism is an important part of the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Program. Proper dress is expected at all times.

Students are expected to wear the ECTE T-shirt during preschool sessions and field trips. This serves as the programs uniform.  Students are required to purchase a T-shirt, which is $7.00. (Students may purchase more and 2 shirts are recommended) The student is responsible for the maintenance of their shirts during the year. Failure to wear the uniform on a preschool day will result in a loss of credit.

You also may wear the ECTE Hoodie/Sweat Pants if they would like to purchase these items. They run approximately $10-$20 per item, and are optional. These items are only available to order at the beginning of the school year.

Students must dress appropriately (according to student code of conduct) all times.

Students must wear shoes that have low heels, straps and/or backs (NO FLIP FLOPS on preschool days).

No hats are to be worn during school times.

Please refrain from long jewelry, including piercings.

Personal Hygiene

Proper Hygiene is required at all times, which includes:

Clean Hair
Brushed teeth
Showers/deodorant
Clean hands including fingernails
No hickeys
Not smelling of smoke
Gum chewing, eating and/or drinking is not permitted during preschool sessions.

TOURS

There will be groups of students touring the building from time to time.  We will try to operate without interruption.  If a member of the group has a question, please feel free to answer.  Remember that you are a representative of the Career Tech and the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Program to the general public and future employers.

EXTRA HELP

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

WORK-BASED LEARNING

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’ s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

 

 

Early Childhood/Teacher Education II Syllabus

Early Childhood/Teacher Education II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 13.000
PSN: 19912

Course number: 
V7410        1 Year 3 credits
V7410M    1 Year 2 credits
(plus Extended Algebra II)

Can receive also 4th yr. Math or VPAA Credit

Instructor/Director: Tracy Vaughan
Teaching Assistants:  Barbara Moore and Gail Kennedy

Time: Monday-Friday
1st shift    7:25 AM - 10:05 AM
2nd shift    11:10 AM - 1:50 PM

Location:  Wayne-Westland Educational Center
Lab: Sunshine & Rainbows Preschool

COURSE DESCRIPTION

The Early Childhood/Teacher Education II Program is a two semester block class. The laboratory section of the program, Sunshine & Rainbows Preschool, begins with the arrival of the preschool children in October.  Students must successfully complete the academic portion of the class before working with the children.  During the second semester, students complete leader and team member competencies as well as internship experiences at an off-site location.

This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the field of early childhood education and teaching as well as provide an understanding and appreciation of all children.  Students continue to study growth and development of children, learn how to plan appropriate activities for the children, study behavior and behavior management, and learn other work related and teaching skills.    

In the on-site lab, which is a state licensed center, Sunshine & Rainbows Preschool, students participate three days a week as classroom assistants and activity leaders.  Students learn techniques of teamwork, leadership and participation, career exploration and employment opportunities are studied as part of the core curriculum.   Multiple work experiences are implemented during the year to provide student with insights about working in the "Real World".  All specific skills taught are listed in the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Performance objectives.    

Course Objectives-Segment Q
 

  • Give examples of how the qualities of effective teaching applies in actual classroom situations
  • Develop an employment portfolio
  • Create a personal philosophy of education
  • Develop a personal portfolio of lesson plans and activities
  • Analyze personal learning styles and intelligences and develop strategies for educating all students
  • Demonstrate clear professional written and oral communication
  • Write educational objectives and lesson plans that include all necessary components
  • Analysis multiple teaching styles and strategies
  • Analysis and evaluate classroom management strategies
  • Develop a Personal Career Plan
  • Complete work based learning experiences

Early Childhood/Teacher Education II Overview

The Early Childhood/Teacher Education II class consist of: An academic component- Independent Study, workbook assignments, lead & set up hands on workshops, Tests and Quizzes, Notebooks and a Laboratory component in which they help run an on-site licensed preschool three days a week, Wednesday thru Friday for children between the ages of 3 and 5 as well as internship/job shadowing experiences.

Book: Teaching; Sharleen L. Kato, Goodheart-Willcox (2010)
Workbook: Student Workbook Teaching; Nancy Henke-Konopasek

Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Prekindergarten - Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing, MI (2005)

September-October

  • Student paperwork-health forms, DHS Clearance, Child abuse forms, student info papers, safety forms
  • Bulletin Boards-Notes, planning, preparation, Quiz
  • Modern & Traditional Manuscript
  • Unit 1 - You: The Teacher of Tomorrow
  • Unit 2 - The Learner
  • Blood borne Pathogens/Universal Precautions
  • Setting up and leading workshops for Early Childhood/Teacher Education I students
  • Unit 3 - The School
  • Unit 4 - The Teacher
  • Career Ready 101/Career Cruising

October-June

  • Lesson Planning and Preparation for Preschool- Science, Math, Computers, Sensory, Blocks, Dramatic Play, Snacks, Active Play, Finger plays/Songs, Large Group, Art, Easel, Cut & Paste, Toyshop (Manipulative), Language Arts/Social Studies, Small group Activities
  • Activity Notebooks - Math Activities, Multicultural Activities, Social Studies File Folder Games, Ecology Activities, Famous Americans Shape & Counting Activities, Language Arts Activities, Manipulative Activities
  • Preschool Child Observation Notebooks
  • Evaluation of progress of preschool children
  • Portfolios for Preschoolers
  • Teamwork/Leadership Skills/Mentoring
  • Supervision for Field Trips/Outdoor Play
  • Internship/Job Shadowing Experience- Day care/ Preschool/Head Start/ Kindergarten through Sixth Grade/Early Intervention Program
  • College application procedures
  • Career Cruising, Career Ready 101
  • Update Career Building/Job Portfolio

Certificates That May Be Awarded

Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement - awarded to those students that complete a full year of the program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Certificate of Completion - awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies completed at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Post-Secondary Articulated Credits

Students may be eligible to receive free college credits for WDFCTC courses they successfully complete.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available will vary by the program and college with which it is affiliated.

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

Participants in the program must have on file before they can work with the children:

A physical exam with a doctor's signature showing that they are in good health and able to work in a Child Care center.

Negative TB test result (also signed by a doctor's office) as well as all their immunizations completed according to the Dept. Human Services Licensing Rules for Child Care Centers.    

According to the State of Michigan Licensing Rules for a Licensed Child Care Center.

R 400.5112 Health of personnel; report, Rule 112.

(1) A center shall have on file a report, signed by a licensed physician for each staff member and each volunteer who has contact with children 4 hrs. or more per week for more than two consecutive weeks.  This report shall declare, to the best of the physician's knowledge, the physical capability of the staff member to perform the duties required.  The report shall be signed no more than 6 months prior to, or 30 days after, the start of employment and every 2 years thereafter.

(2) A center shall have on file evidence that each staff member and each volunteer who has contact with children 4 hrs. or more a week for more than 2 consecutive weeks is free from communicable tuberculosis, verified within 2 years before employment and every 2 years thereafter.

Any Volunteer working with children will need clearance by the Department of Human Services (DHS), formally the Family Independent Agency, for:

Possible child abuse convictions and will also need to sign forms stating that they have never been convicted of child abuse to be kept on file for each person working with the preschool children according to State Licensing.  A Student may also be screened for any criminal background using I-Chat dependent on age.

GRADING POLICY

Grades are awarded for academic achievements and performance of duties in the preschool setting.  Course work during the 1st semester is equally divided between academic work and performance of assigned duties.  During the 2nd semester, performance will account for more of a student's final grade.  A participant's ability to function as a member of a cooperating team and to demonstrate excellent work habits and attendance forms an integral part of each evaluation.  Professional attitudes toward work, mature behavior as well as being good role models for young children are essential of successful completion of the Early Childhood/Teacher Education program.  In addition, future success on the job and the ability to qualify for promotions in the future are dependent on excellent work habits.

Grading System

Academic Component:  Grades are earned by successful completion of assigned work, quizzes and tests.

Preschool Laboratory Component:  Grades are based upon successful performance of tasks and completion of forms used for preschool records.  Grades are awarded for each session and final grades for preschool performance are also based on numbers of days in attendance/number of actual preschool days scheduled.

All work is given a point value and those points will be used to calculate the overall percentage for marking period and semester grades.

The grading scale is as follows:

 90-100%        A
80-89%        B
70-79%        C
60-69%        D
0 –59%        E

Evaluation

Evaluation on academic and laboratory (preschool) performance is computed on a scale, which awards increasing value to student's ability to work effectively with preschoolers in a classroom setting.  Quizzes, written / practical examinations are scheduled periodically throughout the course.  Written examinations include multiple choice, true false, completion and essay questions.  Students earn a performance grade for being present and completing the assigned tasks on preschool days. Students cannot receive credit if they are not in attendance.  Therefore, good attendance is critical.  Evaluation of students on internship is assessed through their attendance and completion of work done by students.  Student’s performance is discussed with them on a daily/weekly basis as necessary to his/her successful performance of tasks.

CLASSROOM POLICIES

Student Conduct

The student will observe common rules of courtesy by:

Showing respect for others, including: staff members, classmates, preschoolers, preschool parents, and guests.

Using classroom property and equipment properly. (Any abuse of equipment will result in disciplinary action.)

The student will demonstrate a positive work attitude by:

Arriving on time.  The ECTE program follows the tardy policy as presented in the student handbook.  Detentions for accumulated tardies are held at the student’s home school. More than 30 minutes late for class will be considered an absence.

Calling in absences:

Absences MUST be called in to the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Office - phone # (734) 419-2113 BEFORE the start of your shift.  This number has a voice mail and you may leave a message.   Students who fail to notify us of their absence may receive a zero for the day’s employee/participation; however, if the EC/TE office is notified a student will be excused for the employee/participation portion of the day.  Frequent absences will affect your grade, as you will fall behind in class work, lab work, and will miss valuable hands-on experiences.

Doing your own work.  Do not allow others to copy your work or both parties will receive no grade.

Arriving prepared for the activities of the day i.e. planning done, projects prepared, etc.

Turning in assignments.  Each class will have a TURN IN FOLDER for assignments.  Late assignments may be reduced one letter grade each day late, after FOUR days the assignment will receive a zero and will not be accepted.

Remaining in their assigned work areas during class time. Students are to remain in class until dismissed by the instructor.  Equipment, books, etc. must be put away before leaving class.

Assignments and Tests

If you are absent, it is your responsibility to check for missed assignments, tests, and lab sessions.

Previous days assignments can be found in the assignment bin in the classroom.

Assignments, tests or quizzes that are taken home, must be turned in the following day to receive credit.  NO EXCEPTIONS!

Arrangements must be made in order to make up missing quizzes or tests.

You will be expected to come to class prepared.  This means that you will have a writing utensil, your notebook, and any work that may be due.

Each class has a folder in the room where they are to turn in work.  When a student competes an assignment he/she is to put the assignment into the TURN IN FOLDER to be graded

Graded and recorded assignments will be returned to the student’s mailbox.  These should be put into your Early Childhood/Teacher Education Notebook.

The color for the AM class is YELLOW.
The color for the PM class is BLUE.

Assignment Notebook

You will be provided with a three ring binder to organize all classwork, quizzes, tests and handouts.  This material will be used on the final exam and it is the student’s best interest to keep the notebook up to date and organized.

Each student will keep track of the assignments on their own personal assignment sheet. It is important to keep this up to date.

Activity Notebook

An activity notebook will be collected during the 2nd semester marking periods.  Each notebook will consist of various lesson plans for activities which can be used with young children.

The activity notebooks need to be organized so that the activities are easily found. A notebook with activities dumped in it will not be graded.

Activity notebooks are to be turned in ON/OR BEFORE THE DUE DATE.  Late notebooks may not be accepted.

Final Project-ECTE II

Each student will design a floor plan for an early childhood or an elementary classroom including placement of furniture/doors, windows, etc. Each student will create a marketing tool for their classroom such as a brochure, video, flyer, etc. which includes all pertinent information for the classroom they have designed.  The student will be given a budget and the student will create a list of supplies/expenses necessary for that classroom that is within the budget.

Portfolio

Each student will complete a job portfolio as a part of the requirements for the second semester.

The portfolio will include a resume, autobiography, responses for job interview questions, their job task descriptions, and samples of their best work in ECTE.

The portfolio should also include pictures taken throughout the school year of preschool sessions and field trips.  Bringing a camera to school and taking pictures throughout the year is encouraged.

Code of Conduct

The student will follow the Rules of Conduct of the William D. Ford Career Technical Center and the Wayne/Westland School District:

Because teamwork, positive attitudes, initiative and effort, along with cooperation and efficiency are so important in acquiring and keeping a job, this year focuses on these skills.  

Failure to adhere to these expectations may result in discipline ranging for student/teacher conferences to administration referrals.

Book Policy

A classroom textbook(s) will be issued to each student.  The student will be responsible for the care and return of the book issued to them.  If the textbook is not returned or returned in poor condition/damaged when the student leaves the ECTE Program, the student will be responsible for the cost of replacing the textbook.  Also students will be responsible for any materials used during the course of the ECTE Program, if these materials are lost, or damaged the student will be responsible for cost of replacing the item.

DRESS CODE

Professionalism is an important part of the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Program. Proper dress is expected at all times.

Students are expected to wear the ECTE T-shirt during preschool sessions and field trips. This serves as the programs uniform.  Students are required to purchase a T-shirt, which is $6.00. (Students may purchase more and 2 shirts are recommended) The student is responsible for the maintenance of their shirts during the year. Failure to wear the uniform on a preschool day will result in a loss of credit.

You also may wear the ECTE Hoodie/Sweat Pants if they would like to purchase these items. They run approximately $10-$20 per item, and are optional. These items are only available to order at the beginning of the school year.

Students must dress appropriately (according to student code of conduct) all times.

Students must wear shoes that have low heels, straps and/or backs (NO FLIP FLOPS on preschool days).

No hats are to be worn during school times.

Please refrain from long jewelry, including piercings.

Personal Hygiene  

Proper Hygiene is required at all times, which includes:

Clean Hair
Brushed teeth
Showers/deodorant
Clean hands including fingernails
No hickeys
Not smelling of smoke

Gum chewing, eating and/or drinking is not permitted during preschool sessions.

TOURS

There will be groups of students touring the building from time to time.  We will try to operate without interruption.  If a member of the group has a question, please feel free to answer.  Remember that you are a representative of the Career Tech and the Early Childhood/Teacher Education Program to the general public and future employers.

EXTRA HELP

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

WORK-BASED LEARNING

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’ s signed permission, the parent/guardian’ s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

 

Electronics/Robotics Technology I & II

Electronics/Robotics Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement. This program will introduce and develop electronic technology skills necessary to succeed in this highly technical world. Through extensive hands-on experiences, basic concepts will be taught, building a solid foundation of knowledge. Troubleshooting areas are taught in conjunction with the proper use of various test equipment such as the volt ohmmeter, digital multi-meter, signal generator and oscilloscope. The high school students will also build their own robotics and compete regionally with other schools. Students complete projects and demonstrate their skills and abilities on an ongoing basis throughout the course.

Electronics/Robotics Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Electronics/Robotics Technology I and instructor's recommendation.

The second year of this program takes students deeper into electronics technology theory through the study of the principles of semiconductor technology. In addition to theory and concepts, students take part in hands-on laboratory projects throughout the course. These laboratory projects simulate real world problems providing students with the optimum foundation of skills necessary to be competitive in today’s job market.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Binary/decimal number conversions
  • Identification of major components used in digital circuits
  • Introduction to programming, microprocessors, interfacing, and communications
  • Basic AC/DC circuit analysis
  • PC board layout/wire wrapping
  • Troubleshooting/problem-solving techniques
  • PC use/interface
  • Basic Robotics

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Computer assisted AC and DC experimenters
  • Computer assisted digital experimenter
  • AC/DC motor control trainer
  • Sequential logic pneumatic trainer
  • Pick and Place Robot
  • Digital trainer
  • Dual trace scopes/VOM multimeters
  • Function generators/digital counters

Occupational Options:
 

  • Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
  • Customer Engineering Specialist
  • Field Service Engineer
  • Electronics Tester/Assembler
  • Electronic Office Machine Repair
  • Technician
  • Electro/Mechanical Technician
  • Prototype Technician
  • Computer Repair Technician
  • Robotics Repair Technician

 

Electronics/Robotics I and Alternative Energies Syllabus

Electronics/Robotics I and Alternative Energies

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP:  47.0101 Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair
Course Number: V7210EM, V7210, V2610EM, V2610

Teacher: Mr. Zachary S. MacLean
(734) 419-2146
macleanz@wwcsd.net

Times:
1st Shift:     7:20 am - 10:05 am    Monday through Friday
2nd Shift:     11:10 am - 1:50 pm    Monday through Friday

Description:

The goal of this course is to help prepare students for positions in industry. The students will not only learn theory, but must demonstrate practical applications in the lab. The course introduces basic current flow, AC/DC circuits, troubleshooting and problem solving techniques, robotics, solar panels and wind turbines installation, circuit board layout, basic house wiring, and soldering. The alternative energies program is designed to develop the basic skills necessary to succeed in the new green world. The program is designed to help prepare students for today's industry and work environment

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher's signed permission, the parent/guardian's signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Leadership and Competitions:

Students are encouraged to participate in various competitions, leadership activities and service projects, such as: SkillsUSA competitions in electronics and/or robotics, regional, state and national; Robofest robotics competitions, regional, state and world through Lawrence Technological University; Square One competitions of large scale IVD (Innovative Vehicle Design) and/or small scale IVD car design; MACUL student technology showcase at the state capitol in Lansing; school I-SAVE program on recycling paper, plastic, metal and saving energy (electoral, air heating/cooling, water); volunteer at animatronics program "Dinosaurs Adventure"; Ford Motor Company's Saturday Science and Technology program; and M.I.T.E.S. competitions.

Evaluation:

Student grades will be determined by three main criteria. The student must demonstrate practical applications, hands on laboratory work, assigned projects, and/or competitions, which are worth 40 percent of their grade. The student's weekly quizzes and final exams are worth 30 percent of their grade. The final 30 percent of a student's grade is based on employability skills, which encompasses attendance, classroom behavior, classroom participation, attitude, appropriate language, tardiness, working with others, group projects and appropriate use of school equipment.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that's convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Late work and/or missing work:

If the student is absent for an exam, the student must make up the exam on the day he/she returns to class. If the student is missing assignments, they also must be turned in as soon as possible. If the school work is late or missing, the student work will have 10 percent deducted per day late. (no late work will be accepted after a card marking)

Academic Credit and Post-Secondary Articulated Credit:

Programs at William D. Ford Career Technical Center give students the opportunity to apply academic content in real-word situations. Each program is aligned to the Michigan Department of Education Gap Analysis, covering all 12 segments in the first semester of the program. Students must pass this course and show proficiency in the academic area to become eligible for academic credit. Students may be eligible to receive free 3 credits per semester for post-secondary (college) credit. Students should contact their counselor to determine eligibility. Besides the electronics/robotics and Alternative Energies credit some students may receive high school credit in the following:

  • Senior math or Embedded Algebra credit
  • Visual performing or Applied Arts credit
  • Science Credit

Certificates that may be awarded:

Certificates of Completion with Outstanding Achievement are awarded only to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale. Students will receive a skill printout of their skills.

Other students may receive a Certificate of Completion, awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale. Students will receive a skill printout of their skills.

Students that complete the full year program and are below level 2 of applicable competencies on a 4-point scale will not receive a certificate, but will receive a skill printout of their skills.

Certificate of Perfect Attendance well be awarded to those with perfect attendance for each semester, with special recognition for those with perfect attendance for the entire school year.

Certificate of Outstanding Attendance will be presented to students maintaining a minimum of 97 percent attendance for the school year.

Course textbooks and References:
 

  • Electricity and Electronics, G.W. Publisher
  • Photovoltaic Systems, ATP Publisher
  • Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology, G.W. Publisher
  • Solar, Hydrogen, Renewable Energies and Fuel Cell Technology, H-Tec (www.h-tec.com)

Videos/ DVDs:
 

  • Alternative Energies, Fuels for the Future
  • Solar Energy, Saved by the Sun, Nova
  • Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars, Nova

Personal Electronics Devices:

To encourage proper focus on classroom activities and learning, students are expected to keep personal electronic devices (PEI)) turned off unless given permission by the instructor. The Wayne-Westland Community School District has enacted a personal electronic device (PEI)) policy. There are three (3) different PED usage areas. Our classroom is a yellow zone. In this classroom PEI)' s are not allowed during lectures, guest speakers, demonstrations, and while working on worksheets. Students may use electronic devices, cell phones, MP3/music players during breaks, in the commons, hallways, before and after class, and (at teacher's discretion) doing computer work and labs. But at all times with PEDS, headphones must be used, with one ear covered only, for safety. Anyone caught using a PED inappropriately will have it taken away until the end of class. If behavior continues, the student will be taken to the office for further disciplinary actions.

I, ______________________________ have read and understand the course syllabus and course policies and expectations for my William D. Ford Career Technical Center electronics/robotics and alternative energies course. I understand that it is expected that I follow all class and school policies.

 

(student signature) _______________________________   (date) __________

Dear parent/ guardian,

Please supply your best contact information below, this information is used to inform parent of changes, school activities and any important information about your student's grades or problems.

 

(parent/ guardian) _______________________________   (date) __________

(best phone number) _______________________________

(E-mail address) _______________________________

Electronics/Robotics II Syllabus

Electronics/Robotics II 

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Second year student segment Q: Advance courses project based

CIP: 47.0101 Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair
Course Number: V2620

Times:
1ST Shift:    7:20 am - 10:05 am    Monday through Friday
2ND Shift:    11:10 am - 1:50 pm    Monday through Friday

Teacher: Mr. Zachary S. MacLean
Phone: (734) 419-2146
Email: macleanz@wwcsd.net

Segments:

The goal of this course is to help prepare students for positions in industry. The students will not only learn theory, but must demonstrate practical applications in the lab. The course introduces students to advanced robotics. The student driven project will allow the students to design and build a robot using three types of sensors, and then program it. The students must demonstrate teamwork, problem solving and critical thinking skills. The robot will be used in a competition. The program is designed to help prepare students for today’s industry and work environment.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Leadership and Competitions:

Students are encouraged to participate in various competitions, leadership activities and service projects, such as:  SkillsUSA competitions in electronics and/or robotics, regional, state and national;  Robofest robotics competitions, regional, state and world through Lawrence Technological University;  Square One competitions of large scale IVD (Innovative Vehicle Design) and/or small scale IVD car design;  MACUL student technology showcase at the state capitol in Lansing;  school I-SAVE program on recycling paper, plastic, metal and saving energy (electoral, air heating/cooling, water);  volunteer at animatronics program “Dinosaurs Adventure”;  Ford Motor Company’s Saturday Science and Technology program; and  M.I.T.E.S. competitions.

Evaluation:

Student grades will be determined by three main criteria. The student must demonstrate practical applications, hands on laboratory work, assigned projects, and/or competitions, which are worth 40 percent of their grade.  The student’s weekly quizzes and final exams are worth 30 percent of their grade. The final 30 percent of a student’s grade is based on employability skills, which encompasses attendance, classroom behavior, classroom participation, attitude, appropriate language, tardiness, working with others, group projects and appropriate use of school equipment.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Late work and/or missing work:

If the student is absent for an exam, the student must make up the exam on the day he/she returns to class. If the student is missing assignments, they also must be turned in as soon as possible. If the school work is late or missing, the student work will have 10 percent deducted per day late. (no late work will be accepted after a card marking)

Academic Credit and Post-Secondary Articulated Credit:

Programs at William D. Ford Career Technical Center give students the opportunity to apply academic content in real-word situations. Students must pass this course and show proficiency in the academic area to become eligible for academic credit. Students may be eligible to receive free 3 credits per semester for post-secondary (college) credit.  Students should contact their counselor to determine eligibility. Besides the electronics/robotics and Alternative Energies credit some students may receive high school credit in the following:

  • Senior math or Embedded Algebra credit
  • Visual performing or Applied Arts credit
  • Science Credit

Certificates that may be awarded:

Certificates of Completion with Outstanding Achievement are awarded only to those students completing the full year program with at least 80% of applicable competencies completed at level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale. Students will receive a skill printout of their skills.

Other students may receive a Certificate of Completion, awarded to those students completing the full year program with at least 70% of applicable competencies at level 2 or higher on a 4-point scale. Students will receive a skill printout of their skills.

Students that complete the full year program and are below level 2 of applicable competencies on a 4-point scale will not receive a certificate, but will receive a competency printout of their skills.

Certificate of Perfect Attendance well be awarded to those with perfect attendance for each semester, with special recognition for those with perfect attendance for the entire school year.

Certificate of Outstanding Attendance will be presented to students maintaining a minimum of 97 percent attendance for the school year.

Course textbooks and References:
 

  • Electricity and Electronics, G.W. Publisher
  • Photovoltaic Systems, ATP Publisher
  • Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology, G.W. Publisher
  • Solar, Hydrogen, Renewable Energies and Fuel Cell Technology, H-Tec (www.h-tec.com)

Videos/ DVDs:
 

  • Alternative Energies, Fuels for the Future
  • Solar Energy, Saved by the Sun, Nova  
  • Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars, Nova

Personal Electronics Devices:

To encourage proper focus on classroom activities and learning, students are expected to keep personal electronic devices (PED) turned off unless given permission by the instructor. The Wayne-Westland Community School District has enacted a personal electronic device (PED) policy. There are three (3) different PED usage areas. Our classroom is a yellow zone. In this classroom PED’s are not allowed during lectures, guest speakers, demonstrations, and while working on worksheets. Students may use electronic devices, cell phones, MP3/music players during breaks, in the commons, hallways, before and after class, and (at teacher’s discretion) doing computer work and labs. But at all times with PEDs, headphones must be used, with one ear covered only, for safety. Anyone caught using a PED inappropriately will have it taken away until the end of class. If behavior continues, the student will be taken to the office for further disciplinary actions.

 

I, _________________________________, have read and understand the course syllabus, course policies and expectations for my William D. Ford Career-Technical Center Electronics/Robotics II course. I understand that it is expected that I follow all class and school policies.

 

(student signature) ___________________________________      (date)  _____________

 

Dear parent/ guardian,

Please supply your best contact information below, this information is used to inform parent of changes, school activities and any important information about your student’s grades or problems.

(parent/ guardian) ____________________________________      (date) _____________

(best phone number) ____________________________________

(E-mail address) ____________________________________

Emergency Medical Technician

Emergency Medical Technician:

1 year – 2 or 3 credits
 

This course is offered to senior students only.

Students must be 18 years old within one year of course completion to be eligible to take the National Registry EMT B-Exam. Students must pass the class with 80% or higher to be eligible to take the National Registry EMT written and practical skills exams.  Students will be required to complete a minimum of 36 clinical experience hours, 24 hours with an EMS provider in an ambulance and 16 hours in an emergency room at a local hospital. These clinicals will be scheduled through the Career-Technical Center.  Upon passing the EMT B-Exam, the student is eligible to continue their studies to be a paramedic.  Students are required to have the Hepatitis B series vaccination and a current TB test. It is recommended that students have no major health problems and that they be able to lift 100 pounds.

Experience:

Students will be required to complete a minimum of 36 clinical experience hours scheduled through William D. Ford Career-Technical Center; 24 hours with an EMS provider in an ambulance and 16 hours in an emergency room at the hospital.

Skills Taught:
 

  • CPR for adults, children and infants
  • (AHA Healthcare Provider card issued)
  • AED
  • Administer oxygen
  • Take vital signs
  • Splint fractures
  • Control bleeding
  • Immobilize patients with suspected spinal or other serious injuries
  • Deal with psychological emergencies
  • Deal with pediatric emergencies
  • Childbirth
  • Treat burns
  • Treat patients involved in accidents

Occupational Options:
 

  • Fire Fighting
  • Law Enforcement
  • Paramedic
  • Nursing
  • Medical Care
  • Industrial Safety

Emergency Medical Technician Syllabus

Emergency Medical Technician

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

I. IDENTIYING INFORMATION

Course Name: Emergency Medical Technician
CIP Number: 51.0000 Therapeutic Services
Course Number: YR1 V2720
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times: Monday – Friday    7:25 am – 10:05 am
Office Hours: Monday – Friday    7:15 am – 2:30 pm or by appointment

Prerequisites: 
Instructor Approval
Negative TB Skin Test
Proof of Hepatitis B vaccine
Physical Exam
Background Check

Instructors:
Kevin Brookshire Jr. AEMT/IC
Cary Thompson AEMT/IC
Timothy Marshall AEMT/IC

Phone Number: (734) 419-2148
Email: cthompson@wwcsd.net

Instructor Background: The instructor cadre are all experienced Emergency Medical Technicians with backgrounds in municipality pre-hospital EMS and Fire Service. Instructor experience ranges from 10 to 30 years of active public service. All instructors hold a state mandated Instructor Coordinator license as well as the required provider license.

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS


Textbooks

Title: Emergency Care and Transportation
Author: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)
Series Editor: Andrew Pollak, MD, FAAOS Edition:  Tenth Edition (2011)
Publisher: Jones and Bartlett Learning
ISBN 978-0-7637-7849-1
Required:  Yes

Online Blended Learning

Title:  Edmodo CMS

The Edmodo learning community will be used to provide custom resources for the student. It contains MS Power Points, study guides and content from a wide variety of sources. It is also used for summative assessments.  

Site:  https://www.edmodo.com
Required:  Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students will receive supplemental study guides, vocabulary lists, skill checklists, medical equipment use directions, notebook, and clinical tracking book. This will be kept in a three ring binder. The binder and all aforementioned material will be issued by staff.  

Students must purchase an approved uniform and a stethoscope for clinical rotations. Uniform will consist of a navy blue polo shirt, EMT style pants, black leather belt, appropriate shoes or boots, and name tag.

III. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Emergency Medical Technician - Basic will prepare the student with the skills and cognitive understanding to perform basic pre-hospital care. After successful completion of class, the student will be able to sit for the National Registry of EMTs exam. This exam can lead to state licensure that will allow the student to gain employment as an EMT-B. Successful licensure will also allow the student to take EMT Paramedic which will allow the student to further their pre-hospital EMS career. Certification in BLS – CPR and First Aid is also obtained during this course.  Professionalism is an important aspect to this program and must be adhered to in the classroom setting and also in the clinical area.  Students will complete clinical rotations in a local emergency room, primary response 911 fire/ rescue, and private EMS transport providers.  Students are required to pass CPR, safety, and patient confidentiality exams prior to clinical rotations. Students must also demonstrate proper affect and provide proof of certain immunizations. A TB test and background check must also be performed.

Permission by Instructor must be obtained to begin clinical rotations

Certificate of Program Completion

Certificate of Completion will be issued to students with:

  • “B-” average or above
  • Successful completion of skills without auto fail criteria.
  • 12 or less absences for the school year.
  • attend 100% of the clinical externship.
  • Professional behavior (refrain from suspensions, positive attitude)

Students can qualify for a Certificate of Completion or a Certificate of Excellence.

Certificates

Upon meeting the criteria, students may earn several certificates for EMT program:

  • Certificate of Completion
  • Certificate of Excellence
  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • BLS – CPR
  • First Aid
  • Hazardous Materials Awareness Level
  • CEVO (driving age and vehicle availability permitting)

College Information

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan such as Ferris State University and Davenport University.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available varies by program and the college with which it is affiliated.

IV. COURSE STANDARDS

The student will spend the listed hours with the corresponding topics:    

PREPARATORY
 

  • 30 hours
  • Introduction to Emergency Medical Care; 1 hour
  • The Well-Being of the EMT-Basic; 5 hours
  • Medical / Legal and Ethical Issues; 2 hours
  • The Human Body; 10 hours
  • Baseline Vitals and SAMPLE History; 4 hours
  • Lifting and Moving Patients; 4 hours
  • General Pharmacology; 4 hours

AIRWAY
 

  • 16 hours
  • Oxygenation, Ventilation; 12 hours
  • EDTLA; 4 hours

PATIENT ASSESSMENT
 

  • 17 hours
  • Scene Size-up; 1 hour
  • Initial Assessment; 2 hours
  • Focused History and Physical Exam: Medical; 4 hours
  • Focused History and Physical Exam: Trauma; 5 hours
  • Detailed Physical Exam; 2 hours
  • On-Going Assessment; 1 hour
  • Communications; 1 hour
  • Documentation; 1 hour

MEDICAL
 

  • 39 hours
  • Respiratory Emergencies 6 hours
  • Cardiovascular Emergencies 16 hours
  • Diabetic Emergencies; 2 hours
  • Allergic Reactions; 1 hour
  • Poisoning/Overdose Emergencies; 3 hours Environmental Emergencies; 2 hours
  • Behavioral Emergencies; 3 hours
  • Obstetrics; 4 hours
  • Abdominal Illness; 1 hour
  • CNS Illness; 1 hour

TRAUMA
 

  • 38 hours
  • Bleeding and Shock (PASG and IV Maintenance); 12 hours
  • Soft Tissue Injuries; 10 hours
  • Musculoskeletal Care; 8 hours
  • Injuries to the Head and Spine; 8 hours

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS
 

  • 10 hours
  • Geriatrics; 2 hours
  • Pediatrics; 8 hours TA-4

OPERATIONS
 

  • 12 hours
  • Ambulance Operations; 2 hours
  • Gaining Access; 5 hours
  • Overview Topics (Triage, Disaster, HazMat); 5 hours Recommended

Classroom Hours: 162
Minimum Required Clinical Hours: 32+
Total Course Hours 194

V.  COURSE REQUIREMENTS
 

  • Regular Internet access
  • Background Check:  Form to be filled out and returned to school so this can be done.  A copy of the background check will go to the student’s clinical site.
  • Community Service Activities:  10 hours required and documented on letterhead
  • Required Uniform and Cost:  Students will be required to wear any color scrubs of their choice.  However, we are working with a local uniform company that will fit students for the uniforms.  Cost for the uniforms is approximately $26.  Students will also be required to have a picture ID badge that is required to wear at clinical sites.  The cost is $2.
  • Work-Based Learning:  Students are required to complete the established number of clinical hours. Clinical rotation is mandatory for licensure. Work-based learning is a valuable experience.  Students will need to provide their own transportation to and from the site. Students create reports on their experience and record details in a clinical tracking book that they are responsible for maintaining.

VI. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
 

Grading Policy

Grade and Minimum Percent

A+      100
A         93
A-       90
B+      86
B         83
B-        80
C+       76
C         73
C-        70
D+       66
D          63
D-         60
E           Below 60

Failure

The above grading scale will be used for report card purposes.  Parents/Guardians will be informed regularly of their child’s progress via email, progress notes, conferences, and phone contact if necessary.  Student grades are entered into MiStar (Zangle).  Parents/Guardians of students outside Wayne/Westland School District are encouraged to gain access to their child’s grades by registering in person at the main office. Parent/Guardian must bring picture identification when registering for MiStar (Zangle) access.

Extra Credit
 

  • Extra credit may be made available at the discretion of the instructor
  • Extra credit will be limited to students who have made a consistent and concerted effort to fulfill all program requirements.

Employability Grade

Weekly Employability skills grades will be included in your overall grade.  Students must actively participate in class, be willing to offer extra help in some way: such as, putting away equipment, straightening the classroom, helping another student, etc. to receive full points.  You may get extra points by completing extra duties or have points subtracted for not following directions such as excessive talking, off task, rudeness to classmates or teacher, being out of designated area, not wearing uniform on required day, sleeping during class, grooming during class, etc.

No points are awarded on days absent unless it is school related.  Daily attendance is required!

Students are responsible for maintaining a clean classroom environment.  Food and beverages will be allowed in the classroom as long as it does not interfere with instruction and will be cleaned up by the student afterwards.  It will not be permitted while using computers or while in the lab or working with equipment.

Students are also responsible for demonstrating respect for school property. It is essential that all students work as a team and have a positive attitude.  Employability grade will reflect this.

Students are expected to come prepared to school daily.  They should have a pen or pencil, paper and other items as requested for the day.  On lab days, students are required to wear their uniform.

Lab/Clinical Skills

A ‘Competency Grade’ will be given for each skill taught.  Practice the skills for long-term retention.  You will be tested only once on the skill, so come prepared for testing off with the   instructors.

VII.  COURSE SEGMENTS

 

  • Acquire CPR with AED certification
  • Acquire First Aid Certification
  • Complete basic medical math problems including conversion problems
  • Perform EKG’s
  • Employ self-assessment, goal setting and action planning skills
  • Perform injections
  • Measure vital signs
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of OSHA and HIPAA standards
  • Possess knowledge of safety standards
  • Possess knowledge of medical terminology
  • Demonstrate sterile technique and follow sterile guidelines
  • Demonstrate proper body mechanics and Ergonomics
  • Develop college and workplace readiness skills
  • Understand the interdependence of the healthcare professions
  • Identify concepts of effective communication
  • Identify and practice creative problem solving skills
  • Identify ethical and legal issues in the health care system
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology
  • Perform hand-washing
  • Measure height and weight
  • Calculate body mass index
  • Develop a team approach to health care
  • Understand Information Technology and the impact on healthcare  
  • Practice Infection Control procedures
  • Develop effective leadership qualities and skills
  • Participate in community service activities
  • Promote a supportive learning environment

VIII.  COURSE POLICIES AND EXPECTATIONS

**The instructor reserves the right to change these procedures/schedule at any time without written notification.  If changed, verbal notification at the least will be given.

Building Initiatives
 

  • Career Ready 101:  Students are expected to take a pre-test in Math and Reading at the beginning of the school year and work to move up to the 4th level.  If pretested at the 4th level or above students must move up a level or at least put in 4 hours.
  • Pre-Tests:  Students are expected to take the course pretest as well as two math tests, Basic Skills and Health Content.  Post tests will be given towards the end of the school year.
  • Nonfiction Writing:  Students will be expected to turn in a nonfiction writing assignment each card marking

Late Work/Missing Assignments (work turned in or missing assignment after determined/ assigned due date)

 

  • Test/Quizzes must be taken day they are assigned
  • Assignments and tests that do not have names on it do not get credit.
  • It is possible that certain kinds of school work such as skills day cannot be made up and, as a result, may negatively impact a student’s grade this makes attendance very important.
  • Missed Assignments with Parent/Guardian Excused Absence and Student contacted teacher:
    • Work assigned prior to an absence (including long-term/major projects/papers)- Work is due upon return from absence.
    • Work assigned on date of an absence – One-day grace period for each day
    • Missed most assignments are recorded in the online classroom web site which make them accessible to the student the instant they are assigned.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to get the assignments missed.
  • Missed Tests with Parent/Guardian Excused Absence and Student contacted teacher:
    • Test missed on date of absence - If student has prior knowledge of test date student is expected to take test day of return.
    • Test scheduled during absence - If student did not have materials for test due to absence student is given one-day grace period to take test.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to arrange for the make-up test.

Extra Help

Instructor will be available for extra help. It is necessary to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and the lead instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Audio books for the class can be made available as well as extra facilitated learning. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Cheating

If a student is found to be cheating on a quiz, test, final exam, or copying someone else’s homework assignment, a zero will be entered in the grade book for the score and a parent will be contacted.

Breaks

Each class is scheduled a 15 min break. Students are expected back in their classroom on time.  Please note: Breaks are optional; teacher may decide to waive break time if she deems it necessary.

Personal Electronic Devices

Cell phones, computer games, walkmans, iPods, and MP3 players are not to be seen or used in the classroom unless granted permission by instructor for instructional purposes.

Sleeping

Sleeping in class is not permitted at any time during this class.  This also includes putting one’s head on their desk to eliminate any debate on the subject.   It will affect employability grade and disciplinary action will be taken.

Attendance

The Wayne-Westland Community School District’s attendance policy will be enforced. You are to arrive on time to class.15 minutes late to class is marked as an absence for the class hour.  All absences should be called in to Career-Tech Center staff or documented with acceptable documentation.

Please note:

At 5 absences, parents will be contacted by teacher.
At 10 absences, parents will be contacted by administration.
At 12 absences for the entire year, you no longer are eligible for the certificate of completion for.

Clinical

 

  • You are expected to attend all clinical experiences scheduled for this class. Any time we are having a clinical experience in the room or at a clinical site, you are expected to come prepared:    
  • Hair up and off collar – no inappropriate hair color (blue, pink, etc.)
  • Short nails and no nail polish.  This is a safety & health hazard and will not be permitted. (Even if clinical site does not have this rule, the rule must be upheld.)
  • No jewelry - no bracelets (gold, plastic, or string), rings, necklaces, eyebrow, nose piercing, and tongue rings.  This is strictly enforced.  You may wear only 1 pair of stud earrings and a watch with your uniform.
  • No perfume, cologne or strong smelling hand lotion.
  • Must have white socks and white leather shoes (no canvas shoes).
  • Name tag must be worn at all times at clinical sites.  Failure to provide a name tag for a clinical site will result in failure to attend a clinical site.  This student will receive a 0 for the day.
  • Approved scrub uniform is required to practice skills, participate in labs, for Clinical Tours, and for Clinicals.  Scrub sets should be clean and unwrinkled (not just pulled out of a bag and put on over other clothing!).  Uniforms should not be worn to school when attending a clinical site.  It is your responsibility to purchase and wear appropriate foot wear and under garments.  If you are dressed unprofessional, you will not only lose employability points, but you will also not be allowed to attend the clinical site.

Clinical experience is an important aspect to this class and participation is required.  It is the responsibility of the student to secure a private clinical position and to have reliable transportation to and from the site.  Failure to obtain a private clinical site can result in termination of class at end of the first semester.

It is the responsibility of the student to obtain a TB test and appropriate vaccinations and proper uniforms for clinical.  Students will not be allowed on clinical sites without this documentation and equipment.

It is your responsibility to arrive in proper dress attire for clinical.  It is your responsibility to have proper ID for clinical at all times.  Failure to do so will result in failure to attend clinical.  

Clinical tracking information is mandatory and must be recorded in the clinical tracking book.  No exceptions!

Attendance is extremely important and will be strictly enforced.  More than 2 absences from your EMS and/or 1 absence from ER clinical may terminate you from clinical and will result in a failing grade for the card marking.  Absences with documentation from a doctor’s office/hospital on appropriate letterhead and special situations will be taken into consideration at the discretion of the instructor.  When unable to attend clinical, it is the responsibility of the student to inform clinical staff of a known absence before the scheduled clinical time and to contact the Instructor.

Students will be responsible for scheduling their own clinical rotations on the FISDAP site.

Firefighter

Firefighter

1 year – 3 credits

 

This course is designed for students who are interested in firefighting and related careers.  This course will prepare students for attendance in a fire academy. Academic and practical skills will be patterned after the guidelines of the Michigan Firefighter Training Council, giving students a comprehensive preview of academy objectives.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Safety
  • Team Building
  • Communication Skills
  • Report Writing
  • Fire Behavior
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Extinguishers, Ropes and Knots
  • Rescue and Extrication
  • Forcible Entry
  • Ground Ladders
  • Ventilation
  • Water Supply
  • Hose, Fire Streams
  • Fire Control
  • Alarms, Suppression and Detection Systems
  • Loss Control, Evidence Preservation
  • Communications
  • First Aid Certification
  • CPR Certification
  • AED Certification
  • Hazardous Materials
  • Fire Prevention and Public Education
  • Company and Individual Drills

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Provided by Michigan Academy of Emergency Services:
  • Boardman 1500 GPM Fire Engine
  • Ford Class B Ambulance/Rescue Vehicle
  • FRS Radios for Communication Skills
  • SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)
  • Level A, B, and C Hazardous Material Protective Suits
  • Basic Medical Equipment
  • Vehicle Extrication Equipment (Jaws of Life)
  • A, B, C, and D Fire Extinguishers
  • Cotton and Rubber Jacketed Fire Hose
  • Static Climbing Rope
  • Rose Safety Harness (Fall Protection)
  • Fire Service Hand Tools
  • “Halligan” Tool
  • Axe
  • Pry Bar
  • Sledge

Occupational Options:
 

  • Firefighter
  • Public Fire and Life Safety Educator
  • Fire Protection Engineer/Specialist
  • Fire Department Health and Safety Officer
  • Fire Department Incident Safety Officer
  • Paramedic
  • EMT
  • Industrial Safety

Uniform Dress:
 

  • Navy Cargo Pants
  • Uniform Polo Shirt
  • Black Belt
  • Black Work Boots

 

Firefighter Syllabus

Firefighter

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Course Name: Firefighter
CIP: 43.0100 Public Safety/Protective Services
PSN: 19871
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times: Monday – Friday 11:10am – 1:50pm

Instructors: Kevin Brookshire Jr IC, Brian Coon, Tim Marshall, Cary Thompson
Phone Number: 734-419-2148

Course Objective:

This course is designed for students who are interested in firefighting and do not meet the age requirement for Michigan Firefighting Training Counsel Firefighter I and II sanctioned training academy. This course will prepare the student for attendance in a fire academy. Academic and practical skills will be patterned after the guidelines of the Michigan Firefighter Training Counsel, giving the students comprehensive preview of academy objectives. Successful completion of this course will count as three elective credits in the Schoolcraft College Fire Technology degree program.

Course Textbook:

Essentials of Fire Fighting Sixth Edition

Grading Policy:

This course is designed to enhance the students’ success in a fire academy, and qualifies for college credits. A blend of academic and practical skills mastery will be evaluated to fulfill the requirements for both. However, the fire academy experience is much more than a scholarly event. A successful fire academy begins with a group of individuals, and ends with an individual group. Each member of that group learns how to work in a team environment, which is critical to safe and successful firefighting. Instructors who have academy experience as a student and field experience as firefighters, fire officers, technical rescue, tactical EMS, and pre-hospital EMS providers are teaching this course. Therefore, the student will be expected to perform, behave, conform, and be graded as they would in a sanctioned fire academy.

Grade Criterion:

Employability: 30%
Work: 30%
Assessment: 40%

Grade Scale

A+         100%
A            94%
A-           90%
B+          87%
B            84%
B-           80%
C+          77%
C             74%
C-            70%
D+           67%
D             64%
D-            60%
E               0%

Appropriate Dress:

Firefighting is an activity that requires teamwork and focus on the task. Attention must be on the activity and the team, not the individual. This course will require the following uniform.

Class A (Dress Uniform) Button Up Shirt, Slacks, Belt, and Dress Shoes
Class B (Work Uniform) Navy Cargo Pants, Uniform Polo Shirt, Black Belt, Black Work Boots
Class C (PT Uniform) Navy T Shirt /Sweatshirt, Navy Sweatpants, and gym shoes

Select individuals will need a Skills USA polo shirt for region, state, and national competition.

A plain navy blue baseball or knit cap may be worn during training events outside. Hats must be worn with the bill facing straight forward and must be removed upon entrance to any building. Shirts must be tucked in and pants must be worn on the hips. Boots must remain polished, and must be worn fully laced and tied, with pant cuff over the boot. Uniforms shall be maintained in a clean, neat, un-faded condition and be free of offensive smells.

Course Schedule Format:

Module & Subject Matter

  1. Orientation, Safety, and Health
  2. Fire Behavior, Building Construction        
  3. Personal Protective Equipment
  4. Extinguishers, Ropes, and Knots
  5. Rescue and Extrication, Forcible Entry
  6. Forcible Entry
  7. Ground Ladders, Ventilation
  8. Ventilation, Water Supply
  9. Hose and Fire Streams
  10. Fire Streams and Fire Control
  11. Alarms, Suppression, and Detections Systems
  12. Loss Control and Evidence Preservation
  13. Communications and First Aid
  14. First Aid
  15. Hazardous Materials
  16. Hazardous Materials Operations
  17. Fire Prevention and Public Education
  18.  
  19. Company and Individual Drills Prep

 

State Segments:
 

  1. Organizational Structure
  2. Professional Standards including Ethics and Legal Responsibility
  3. Safety, Health and Environment    
  4. Public Safety Branches
  5. Law and Legal System        
  6. Public Relations
  7. Career Development
  8. Workplace Technology
  9. Problem Solving/Investigations
  10. Leadership and Team Work
  11. Communications
  12. Applied Academic in Law and Public Safety

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help.  Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for you.  Test/quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Base Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate.  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year.  Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study.  The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site.  Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Game Design & Programming I & II

Game Design and Programming I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This course introduces students to computer programming through game design. It is intended for students who want to pursue a career in an information technology field such as: computer science, engineering, software development, or consulting. Students create and test a variety of games and then develop enhancements for them.

Primary tools include JavaScript and Game Maker. Students learn and practice a range of skills utilizing: functions, arrays, loops, random numbers, inheritance, sprites, animation, sound editing, parallax motion, and game physics. Progress from being just a game player to a game designer.

Game Design and Programming II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Game Design and Programming I and instructor’s recommendation.

The primary focus of this course is to extend the skill-set from Year 1. Students will conduct research on the leading mobile operating systems, such as iOS and Android and research current trends in User Interface (UI) design. Students learn about and develop apps that can be used on a variety of different devices. Students evaluate the costs and benefits of "native" app development with developing web apps. Explore the latest games, platforms, and technologies, including prototypes featured on crowd funding sites.

By developing code for mobile and wearable computers, students transition from knowing "there's an app for that", to stating: "I made an app for that."

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught: 
 

  • Computer Programming
  • Coding in: JavaScript, python, GML
  • Introduction to SQL, XML, JSon
  • Problem Solving & Debugging
  • Producing and Editing Audio
  • Game Level Design
  • Using Code Libraries and APIs
  • Tools & Techniques for Group Development
  • Survey Design & Data Analysis
  • 3D Model & STL Creation 
  • Presentation & Communication Skills
  • Portfolio Development

Specialized Equipment and Materials:
 

  • Modern, networked PCs
  • Online course materials & course calendar
  • Screen Recording Software
  • Audio Editing Software
  • Game systems (modern and classic)
  • HTC Vive Virtual Reality hardware
  • Multiple 3D Printers
  • Raspberry Pi Linux Computers
  • Android, iOS, and Surface Tablets

Occupational Options: 
 

  • Game Designer
  • Software Developer
  • App Developer (web and native apps)
  • Help Desk Support Specialist
  • Database Administrator
  • Software Engineer
  • Web Developer
  • Entrepreneur

Sample Projects:
 

  • Mini Text Adventure Game
  • Fishpod (platformer)
  • Zool (arcade style)
  • Classic game re-makes
  • Copyright & Creative Commons
  • Raspberry Pi Zero Cases 
  • Student Portfolios

 

Game Design & Programming I Syllabus

Game Design & Programming I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

State CIP: 11.0201 Computer Programming, Programmer
Course Number: V7110
PSN: 19024

Instructor: JC Irvine

NOTICE: It may be necessary to modify this document during the year.  A current version will be available online.

Course Description

This course introduces students to computer programming through game design. It is intended for students who want to pursue a career in the information technology field such as:  engineering, programming, or consulting.  Students focus on proper planning, programming and testing a variety of games.  Primary tools include JavaScript and Game Maker.  Example games include: Guessing Game, Adventure game, and a platform game with multiple levels.  Students learn and have hands-on coding practice with topics including: functions, arrays, loops, classes, sprites, animation, sound, and game physics.  Students progress from being just game players to game designers.  Each student designs and creates a portfolio to showcase his/her abilities related to the course.  Student demonstrations, projects, and tutorials are all components of the online portfolios.

Course Materials

Course Web Site: http://moodle.resa.net/ww/
Each student will have a unique account to access course resources and submit electronical work.

Primary Course Book:  The Game Maker's Companion, By: Jacob Habgood
ISBN: 1430228261
Publisher: Apress, Published:  September 2010
Paperback: 350 pages

Each student will have an in-class copy of the book.  The student is responsible for his/her assigned book.

Hardware & Software (partial list)
 

  • Networked Computers:  Both Mac & PC
  • Raspberry Pi (Linux-based machines)
  • JavaScript: A programming language available in all modern browsers.
  • Browsers:  Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, IE
  • Large Screen TVs  (collaborative work)
  • SmartBoard & Hi-Def Projectors
  • Free/Open Source Software* (multiple packages – list available on site)

The instructor also has an in-class tech library which is an added resource.  This library is conveniently set in the classroom and students are encouraged to use these items to accomplish course assignments.  When time permits, students may also pursue self-directed learning into advanced/specialized topics such as databases, java, C++, art, and animation.

Electronic Resources

The course employs a great deal of technology and therefore utilizes many on-line resources.  The instructor will supply students with links that range from instructor created materials to online tutorials applicable to student tasks.  In addition, students are encouraged to enrich the learning community by sharing exceptional resources they find.

One final student resource is the course web site.  Students register at this site at the beginning of the year and then receive agendas, resources, assignments, etc. by logging in each day.  The site is Internet-based and available to the student (as well as parents/guardians) at any time. The starting page for the site is:  http://moodle.resa.net/ww/

Course Credit

This is a year-long course (2 semesters) which meets each week day (Monday through Friday).  Upon successful completion of each semester, students earn 1.5 credits*.  Articulation credit may be earned based on instructor review.

Projects

Students will create many games/programs throughout the course.  Periodically, people outside of class will review/evaluate student work.  The goal of these projects is to give students direct experience creating, documenting, and evaluating code projects and game creations.  Some example projects include:

  • Puzzle & Quiz Games
  • Platform Games
  • Guessing Game
  • Inventory Game  
  • Portfolio (required for course completion certificate)

State CTE Segments & Units Covered:

 

  •  CTE Segment 1 - Sem 2
    • Business Communication
  • CTE Segment 2 - Sem 1
    • Ethics, Legal, Copyright, Safety
  •  CTE Segment 3 – Sem 1
    • Career & Employability (Entrepreneurship)
  •  CTE Segment 4 – Sem 1
    • Information Technology Fundamentals
  •     CTE Segment 5 – Sem 1
    • Logic & Problem Solving
  •  CTE Segment 6 – Sem 1
    • Beginning Application Development
  •  CTE Segment 7 – Sem 2
    • Advanced Application Development
  •  CTE Segment 8 – Sem 1
    • Leadership & Teamwork
  •  CTE Segment 9 – Sem 1
    • Programming Fundamentals & Syntax
  • CTE Segment 10 – Sem 2
    • Needs Assessment/Project Planning
  •  CTE Segment 11 – Sem 2
    • Debug & Software Testing (Quality Assurance)
  • CTE Segment 12 – Sem 2
    • Program Maintenance (Enhancements)

Timeline Planning

Below is a general indication of topics covered during a 6-week marking period; modifications may be necessary.

Semester 1 Topics
 

MP 1

Intros and surveys, program languages, Moodle, audio, file types and sizes, pre-tests, PBiS, intro Evernote, memory and binary, intro JavaScript, JavaScript topics, JS challenges, Evernote usage, safety: part 1, Snipping Tool, safety: part 2, JavaScript coding, file and folders, presentation project 1, presentations, JS mastery, JS skills test

MP 2

CareerReady 101: part 1, audio files, JavaScript topics, Jing intro and project 1, JS games own, testing and evaluations, Excel: data entry and analysis, Inventory game, audio editing group work: game modifications, Game Maker 8 intro and basics, Jing demo project 2, research: Game Maker tutorials, Excel graphs

MP 3

Intro book 1: Game Makers Companion, Fruit game, copyright intro, chapter 2 Fishpod, copyright project, Fishpod extensions, skills demos, game testing, exam preparation, review and exams

Semester 2 Topics

 

MP 4

Power Lessons: Skills Demos, intro ZOOL, GMC chapter 2, GMC chapter 3: ZOOL Demo Requests, GMC chapter 3: Game Modifications, XML discussion, own game plan, UM Dearborn

MP 5

GMC chapter 4: Own Game Development, GMC chapter 5: Game Modifications, CareerReady 101 part 2, class game – UMD, GMC chapter 6: College Plus, ZOOL: own modifications, game testing

MP 6

Exploration: more tools for development, GMC chapters 7 thru 12: Shadows on Deck, GMC chapter 13, portfolio and final project, presentations and review

Evaluation and Grading

Students are evaluated in a variety of ways.  In addition to regular assignments and coursework, students are given Skills Tests upon completion of certain units.  These tests are designed to determine both how well a student can explain key concepts (in written form) as well as how well he/she can perform certain skills (actually creating solutions using the computer). Students earn points for assignments and these are then the basis for determining a marking period grade.  Typically, a marking period has roughly 300 points available.  A student’s grade is determined by how many of the available points he/she has earned.  Based on the percentage of points earned, a student will be assigned a letter grade:

99% or higher = A+
92 - 98%     = A
90 - 91%     = A-
89%         = B+
82 - 88%     = B
80 - 81%     = B-
79%         = C+
72 - 78%     = C
70 - 71%     = C-
69%         = D+
62 - 68%     = D
60 - 61%     = D-
under 60%     = E
 

Career Ready / Key train

KeyTrain® is an interactive training system.  KeyTrain provides a comprehensive learning system for common skills required by all jobs, based on ACT's WorkKeys® employment system.  For this school year, the center has set targets in reading and mathematics for each student.  Students access the KeyTrain site and take pretests.  All students participate in additional training, practice, and remediation in order to improve their academic and career skills.

Employability

As a facility, the William D. Ford Career Technical Center has chosen to address “Employability” as a key area to both track and promote employer-desired practices.  As a result of building discussions and input from our local business partners, we have found that attendance, attitude, and effort (work ethic) are primary concerns related to a person’s employability.  As such, a score reflecting each student’s overall employability is tracked weekly and graded.

Students may receive high marks by consistently working productively, taking a leadership role, by assisting other students, or seeking out additional topics of study/work from the instructor.  Students will be marked down if their behavior/attitude is inappropriate. Some examples of inappropriate behavior include: tardiness, not doing work, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property.

Work-Based Learning

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Additional Activities & Optional Opportunities  
 

  • National Career-Technical Honor Society (min. course GPA & overall GPA)
  • Square Projects:  v2x & I.V.D. (all students at the center are invited to be involved)
  • UM Dearborn Contests - Spring  
  • JavaScript Certification
  • Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (multiple options available)
  • Advanced Placement Test in Computer Science
  • Year 2 of Course: Successful completion of Year 1 and Permission of Instructor

Classroom Rules & Acceptable Use Policy

We have an impressive array of equipment available for students' educational use.  It is essential that students behave appropriately and use district property as intended. To ensure safety and equipment availability, parents and students are asked to review and sign off on the following expectations and guidelines.

  1. District Equipment & Property
    1. School tools (computers, cameras, scanners, tablets, microphones, etc.) are the property of the district and are to be used solely in the pursuit of learning and mastering course skills.
    2. Any use of district property not related to class activities and assigned course work is not allowed.
    3. If a student is unsure how to use equipment properly he/she is responsible for checking with the instructor.  If the appropriateness of an activity is unclear, students shall seek permission beforehand.
    4. Students are expected to know and follow proper techniques for using any equipment used in class. If a student is unclear how to use/care for equipment, he/she shall seek assistance beforehand.
    5. Tampering with equipment in the classroom and/or network is taken seriously and has resulted in disciplinary and/or legal action.  
  2. Classroom Safety  
    1. Students are expected to know and follow proper safety measures for day-to-day activities as well as for emergencies.  Procedures are discussed & demonstrated in class.
  3. Personal Electronics
    1. To encourage proper focus on classroom activities and learning, students are expected to keep personal electronic devices turned off unless given permission by the instructor.  Examples devices include: cell phones, MP3/music players, game systems.  If a student uses a device at break time, he/she is responsible for having the item properly turned off when break ends. If a device is needed prior to school or after class has ended, students shall put it away during class time.  Students are responsible for the security of items they bring to school.
    2. Students who use devices when NOT given appropriate permission will surrender their equipment to the teacher until the remainder of the class period.  If a student accumulates three infractions, disciplinary action will be taken.  Non-compliance will result in disciplinary action.  
    3. Students should be aware that expensive technology is often small and can be targeted by thieves – leaving non-essential items at home is the best theft deterrent.
  4. To prepare students for the workplace, headgear (such as hats & bandanas) is not permitted.  
  5. Students shall bring a pen or pencil to class every day.  
  6. Respect & Accountability
    1. Students shall respect their peers & school personnel and receive the same in return.
  7. Students shall properly return equipment & books to their designated areas.
  8. Students shall maintain clean work areas (including the Commons) so they are presentable, in good working order, and ready for others to use.
  9. Students shall maintain regular attendance to class.
    1. Employability scores are a combination of attitude, attendance, and effort.
    2. Low employability scores affect course grades and may result in a loss of credit.
  10. Breaks and other rewards are potentially available for students who have completed required work in a timely fashion.  Breaks are a privilege.  
  11. All school and district policies apply.  Modifications may be made as necessary.

Important Note: Students may lose equipment privileges if they do not return this form & abide by these policies.

By signing below, I verify that I understand all of the procedures and policies in the Student Handbook. I will follow them as stated and give my best effort to adhere to all policies that contribute to the safety and order of the WDF Game Design and Programming Lab.

Student Sign Off:
 

_____________________________ Student Printed Name

 

_____________________________ Student Signature

 

_____/_____/_____ Date


By signing below, my parent or guardian agrees to support the instructors in maintaining safety and order in the Game Design and Programming Lab.

 

Parent/Guardian Sign Off:

 

_____________________________ Parent/Guardian Printed Name

_____________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

_____/_____/_____ Date



Important Note: Students may lose equipment access if they do not return this form & abide by these policies.

Instructor Pledge:

By signing below, the instructor agrees to provide an environment conducive to learning course skills, to make available experiences that facilitate learning and promote awareness of job opportunities.

_____________________________ Instructor, JC Irvine        _____/_____/_____ Date

 

It is the policy of the Wayne-Westland community Schools board of Education to prohibit any acts of unlawful discrimination in all matters dealing with students, employees or applicants for employment. The Wayne-Westland Schools reaffirms its policy of equal educational and employment opportunities for all persons without regard to race, color, gender, religion, age, height, weight, marital status or disability which is unrelated to an individual’s qualifications for employment or promotion, or which is unrelated to an individual’s ability to utilize and benefit from the School District’s services, activities, benefits, privileges or programs. Inquiries concerning the application of Title VI, Title IX, Section 504 and Title II legislation should be directed to the Executive Director of Student and Legal Affairs, Wayne-Westland Community Schools, 36745 Marquette, Westland, MI 48185 (734-419-2083).

 

Game Design & Programming II Syllabus

Game Design & Programming II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

State CIP: 11.0201
Course Number: V7120
PSN: 19024

Instructor: JC Irvine

NOTICE: It may be necessary to modify this document during the year.  A current version will be available online.

Course Description

The primary focus of this course is to extend the skill-set from Year 1 into mobile apps and game development.  Students will use and conduct research on the leading mobile operating systems, such as iOS and Android.  Students will learn about and develop apps that can be used and played on a variety of different devices. Students will compare costs and benefits of "native" app development to developing web apps.  Students will research current trends in User Interface (UI) design. Students will explore the latest technologies coming to market as well as those on crowd funding sites.  Instead of just knowing "there's an app for that", students will be able to say "I made an app for that."

Course Materials

Online Resources & Software
Course Web Site:  http://moodle.resa.net/ww/

  • Evernote
  • LiveCode: A development tool available to create cross platform applications
  • Unity

Software Tools & Apps (partial list)

  • Programming: JavaScript, jQuery, python
  • Game Development: Game Maker Studio, Unity
  • Cloud Usage: Drive, Git, Portfolios via Wix/Weebly
  • Browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, I.E.

Hardware

  • Networked Computers: Both Mac & PC
  • Raspberry Pi (Linux-based machines)
  • Large Screen TVs (collaborative work)
  • SmartBoard & Hi-Def Projectors

Tablets

  • iPads from Apple
  • Xooms from Motorola
  • Galaxy Tab
  • Asus Tablet
  • Microsoft Surface Pro

Gaming Hardware

  • Wii and Wii U
  • XBox 360 and One
  • PS4
  • Atari Throwback
  • Ouya Console & Controllers

In addition to the above, the instructor has a library of books that are used as additional resources.  This library is conveniently set in the classroom and students are encouraged to use these items as additional resources to accomplish course assignments.  When time permits, students may also pursue self-directed learning into advanced/specialized topics.

Electronic Resources

The course employs a great deal of technology and therefore utilizes many on-line resources.  The instructor will supply students with links such as the Unity Curriculum and tutorials applicable to student tasks for LiveCode.  In addition, students are encouraged to enrich the learning community by sharing exceptional resources they find.

One final student resource is the course web site.  Students register at this site at the beginning of the year and then receive agendas, resources, assignments, etc. by logging in each day.  The site is Internet-based and available to the student (as well as parents/guardians) at any time. The starting page for the site is:  http://moodle.resa.net/ww/

Course Credit

This is a year-long course (2 semesters) which meets each week day (Monday through Friday).  Upon successful completion of each semester, students earn 1.5 credits.  Articulation credit may be earned based on instructor review.

Projects

Students will create many games/programs throughout the course.  Periodically, people outside of class will review/evaluate student work.  The goal of these projects is to give students direct experience creating, documenting, and evaluating programs, apps, and games.  Some example projects include:

  • User Interfaces
  • jQuery, python Application
  • Raspberry Pi Games
  • Web and Native Apps
  • LiveCode Apps
  • Data & Databases
  • Game of Choice for in class Contest
  • Social Good App
  • 3D Modeling and Printing
  • Senior Project: Student Choice
  • Portfolio (required for course completion certificate)

Segment Q Topics

 

  1. Utilize an online code repository for version control
  2. Research & Present current standards in GUI design
  3. Research, compare, and test current app development tools
  4. Build an app (web and/or native)
  5. Test an app creation on 1 or more devices/platforms
  6. Research and utilize latest programming tools/libraries
  7. Write code to be used on a current microcontroller  
  8. Utilize sensors for input/output in conjunction with a current microcontroller
  9. Present a cloud-based portfolio
  10. Utilize 3D tools to create models & objects
  11. Research I.T. trends in hardware and software  
  12. Utilize cloud-based documents for team collaboration

Semester 1 Topics

 

  • Intros and surveys
  • CareerReady 101
  • 3D modeling
  • Raspberry Pi - intro
  • Hardware Analysis - python intro
  • Raspberry Pi – Linux
  • SSH
  • Software analysis - python cont.
  • User interfaces
  • Discussion and research
  • Web vs Native: Apps Career Ready
  • App evaluation design & function
  • Kickstarter and IndieGogo
  • Research project
  • jQuery and other JavaScript libraries
  • Data and file organization  
  • MIT App Inventor and LiveCode intro
  • LiveCode practice
  • Review and exams

Semester 2 Topics

 

  • Data and databases
  • Problem solving: strategies
  • Student game: class contest
  • App publishing: testing on devices
  • App videos: skills demo
  • School app: student design
  • App testing and improvement
  • Social Good app
  • Tech Topics: Guest lectures
  • Resume refining
  • Portfolio and senior project
  • Portfolio presentations and review

Evaluation and Grading

Students are evaluated in a variety of ways.  In addition to regular assignments and coursework, students are given Skills Tests upon completion of certain units.  These tests are designed to determine both how well a student can explain key concepts (in written form) as well as how well he/she can perform certain skills (actually creating solutions using the computer). Students earn points for assignments and these are then the basis for determining a marking period grade.  Typically, a marking period has roughly 300 points available.  A student’s grade is determined by how many of the available points he/she has earned.  Based on the percentage of points earned, a student will be assigned a letter grade:

99% or higher = A+
92 - 98%     = A
90 - 91%     = A-
89%         = B+
82 - 88%    = B
80 - 81%     = B-
79%         = C+
72 - 78%     = C
70 - 71%    = C-
69%         = D+
62 - 68%     = D
60 - 61%     = D-
under 60%     = E

Career Ready / Key train

KeyTrain® is an interactive training system.  KeyTrain provides a comprehensive learning system for common skills required by all jobs, based on ACT's WorkKeys® employment system.  For this school year, the center has set targets in reading and mathematics for each student.  Students access the KeyTrain site and take pretests.  All students participate in additional training, practice, and remediation in order to improve their academic and career skills.

Employability

As a facility, the William D. Ford Career Technical Center has chosen to address “Employability” as a key area to both track and promote employer-desired practices.  As a result of building discussions and input from our local business partners, we have found that attendance, attitude, and effort (work ethic) are primary concerns related to a person’s employability.  As such, a score reflecting each student’s overall employability is tracked weekly and graded.

Students may receive high marks by consistently working productively, taking a leadership role, by assisting other students, or seeking out additional topics of study/work from the instructor.  Students will be marked down if their behavior/attitude is inappropriate. Some examples of inappropriate behavior include: tardiness, not doing work, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property.

Work-Based Learning

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Additional Activities & Optional Opportunities
 

  • National Career-Technical Honor Society (min. course GPA & overall GPA)
  • Square Projects:  v2x & I.V.D. (all students at the center are invited to be involved)
  • UM Dearborn Contests - Spring  
  • JavaScript Certification
  • Microsoft Office Specialist Certification (multiple options available)
  • Advanced Placement Test in Computer Science

Classroom Rules & Acceptable Use Policy

We have an impressive array of equipment available for students' educational use.  It is essential that students behave appropriately and use district property as intended. To ensure safety and equipment availability, parents and students are asked to review and sign off on the following expectations and guidelines.

  1. District Equipment & Property
    1. School tools (computers, cameras, scanners, tablets, microphones, etc.) are the property of the district and are to be used solely in the pursuit of learning and mastering course skills.
    2. Any use of district property not related to class activities and assigned course work is not allowed.
    3. If a student is unsure how to use equipment properly he/she is responsible for checking with the instructor.  If the appropriateness of an activity is unclear, students shall seek permission beforehand.
    4. Students are expected to know and follow proper techniques for using any equipment used in class. If a student is unclear how to use/care for equipment, he/she shall seek assistance beforehand.
    5. Tampering with equipment in the classroom and/or network is taken seriously and has resulted in disciplinary and/or legal action.  
  2. Classroom Safety  
    1. Students are expected to know and follow proper safety measures for day-to-day activities as well as for emergencies.  Procedures are discussed & demonstrated in class.
  3. Personal Electronics
    1. To encourage proper focus on classroom activities and learning, students are expected to keep personal electronic devices turned off unless given permission by the instructor.  Examples devices include: cell phones, MP3/music players, game systems.  If a student uses a device at break time, he/she is responsible for having the item properly turned off when break ends. If a device is needed prior to school or after class has ended, students shall put it away during class time.  Students are responsible for the security of items they bring to school.
    2. Students who use devices when NOT given appropriate permission will surrender their equipment to the teacher until the remainder of the class period.  If a student accumulates three infractions, disciplinary action will be taken.  Non-compliance will result in disciplinary action.  
    3. Students should be aware that expensive technology is often small and can be targeted by thieves – leaving non-essential items at home is the best theft deterrent.
  4. To prepare students for the workplace, headgear (such as hats & bandanas) is not permitted.  
  5. Students shall bring a pen or pencil to class every day.  
  6. Respect & Accountability
    1. Students shall respect their peers & school personnel and receive the same in return.
  7. Students shall properly return equipment & books to their designated areas.
  8. Students shall maintain clean work areas (including the Commons) so they are presentable, in good working order, and ready for others to use.
  9. Students shall maintain regular attendance to class.
    1. Employability scores are a combination of attitude, attendance, and effort.
    2. Low employability scores affect course grades and may result in a loss of credit.
  10. Breaks and other rewards are potentially available for students who have completed required work in a timely fashion.  Breaks are a privilege.  
  11. All school and district policies apply.  Modifications may be made as necessary.

Important Note: Students may lose equipment privileges if they do not return this form & abide by these policies.

By signing below, I verify that I understand all of the procedures and policies in the Student Handbook. I will follow them as stated and give my best effort to adhere to all policies that contribute to the safety and order of the WDF Game Design and Programming Lab.

Student Sign Off:

 

_____________________________ Student Printed Name

 

_____________________________ Student Signature

 

_____/_____/_____ Date

 

By signing below, my parent or guardian agrees to support the instructors in maintaining safety and order in the Game Design and Programming Lab.

 

Parent/Guardian Sign Off:

 

_____________________________ Parent/Guardian Printed Name

 

_____________________________ Parent/Guardian Signature

 

_____/_____/_____ Date


Important Note: Students may lose equipment access if they do not return this form & abide by these policies.

Instructor Pledge:

By signing below, the instructor agrees to provide an environment conducive to learning course skills, to make available experiences that facilitate learning and promote awareness of job opportunities.

_____________________________        _____/_____/_____

Instructor, JC Irvine    Date

 

It is the policy of the Wayne-Westland community Schools board of Education to prohibit any acts of unlawful discrimination in all matters dealing with students, employees or applicants for employment. The Wayne-Westland Schools reaffirms its policy of equal educational and employment opportunities for all persons without regard to race, color, gender, religion, age, height, weight, marital status or disability which is unrelated to an individual’s qualifications for employment or promotion, or which is unrelated to an individual’s ability to utilize and benefit from the School District’s services, activities, benefits, privileges or programs. Inquiries concerning the application of Title VI, Title IX, Section 504 and Title II legislation should be directed to the Executive Director of Student and Legal Affairs, Wayne-Westland Community Schools, 36745 Marquette, Westland, MI 48185 (734-419-2083).

 

Graphic Design I & II

Graphic Design I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Graphic Design I offers a comprehensive introduction into the world of graphic design. Age-old concepts such as type, image, color and composition are integrated with modern technology to introduce graphic design as a form of visual communication. While no pre-requisites are required to enroll in Graphic Design I, it is recommended that students have an interest in the visual arts. Art majors are seriously encouraged. Students should also enjoy completing the majority of their work on a computer. The graphic design department operates a complete working shop, allowing students a vast amount of hands-on experience. Our lab is a state-of-the-art facility that rivals many post-secondary classrooms.

Graphic Design II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Graphic Design I and instructor's recommendation.

With basic training in the art of graphic design completed, students in Graphic Design II focus on the mastery of design and graphic technology.  In addition, this course emphasizes competitions, scholarships, portfolios and self-promotion to prepare students for post-secondary education or careers in the field.  All second-year students will have a professional portfolio upon successful completion of the course.  Students are encouraged to participate in competitions that offer scholarships and awards.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Software:
 

  • Adobe Acrobat CC
  • Adobe Photoshop CC
  • Adobe Illustrator CC
  • Adobe InDesign CC
  • Adobe Animate CC
  • Adobe Bridge
  • Cut Studio-Vinyl Sign

Special Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Large format printers
  • Roland cutter/plotters    
  • Medium format color laser printers
  • Heat/laminating presses     
  • Six-position screen press
  • Matting and Framing equipment

Occupations:
 

  • Art Director
  • Producer
  • Account Representative
  • Designer:
  • Print, Packaging, Web,
  • Motion Graphics, Signs, and
  • Automotive Graphics
  • Illustrator: Technical, 3D, Character, Comic,
  • Image Manipulation, and Animation
  • Production: Pre-press, Screen Printer, Heat Transfer, and Sign Making

Skills Taught:
 

  • Typography
  • Color theory
  • Traditional illustration    
  • 2D digital illustration/animation
  • 3D digital illustration/animation
  • Photo/image manipulation
  • Print design    
  • Web design and production
  • Interactive design and production
  • Screen printing

 

Graphic Design I Syllabus

Graphic Design I Syllabus

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Course: Graphic Design I
Instructor(s): Mark Benglian / Shirley Byrd
Phone: 734-419-2101 / 734-419-2147
E-mail: benglianm@wwcsd.net / byrds@wwcsd.net

CIP: 10.0301 - Graphic & Printing Technology - Consolidated
PSN: 14207
Course #: V1010 Graphic Design 1

Office Hours:
Shift 1 -  7:20 am - 10:05 am — Monday - Friday
Shift 2 - 11:10 am - 1:50 pm — Monday - Friday

State Consolidated Standards
 

  1. Academic Foundations
  2. Communications
  3. Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking
  4. Information Technology Applications
  5. Systems
  6. Safety, Health and Environmental
  7. Leadership and Teamwork
  8. Ethics and Legal Responsibilities
  9. Employability and Career Development
  10. Technical Skills
  11. Printing Pathway

State Segments
 

  1. Industry Overview
  2. Safety and Health
  3. Intro to Design and Image Development
  4. Introduction to Image Output
  5. Introduction to Finishing Operations
  6. Employability Skills and Portfolio
  7. Applied Academics
  8. New Media, Advanced Design and Image Level
  9. Leadership
  10. Advance Image Output
  11. Advanced Finishing Operations
  12. Project Management

Course Description

The Graphic Design class teaches the latest technology for producing print, web, multimedia and display graphics.  Students will explore a variety of traditional and digital media. Projects introduce students to typography, digital and traditional illustration, 3D modeling and rendering, digital photography, web page design, multimedia, silkscreen, environmental design and self-promotion. Software:  Acrobat Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks, Microsoft Office Suite, Daz Bryce 3D, ZBrush, Maya, and Cut Studio Vinyl Sign Software.

Leadership and Competitions

Students are encouraged to participate in various leadership activities: SkillsUSA membership and SkillsUSA competitions, various design contest such as the North American International Auto Show Poster Contest, I-Save Poster, Shirt Designs, and Scholastic Art Awards.

Course Materials/Resources

Students will use Macintosh Computers with the following software:  Adobe CC: InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator; Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint. Students will use the internet to research design samples, client needs and software tutorials. Students will download fonts to upload on their computers.

Recommended Student Supplies  

Flash Drive to back up student computer work.

Course Requirements / Work Based Learning  

Students will be required to do an off campus Business/Industry Visitation (Work Based Learning).  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a graphics business.  Students will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the Instructor regarding the experience.

Dress Code

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford Career-Tech Dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, Graphics students are not allowed to wear open toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford Career-Tech Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED)
 

  1. No Cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the Graphics/Printing classroom. For Emergencies Students and Parents may use the classroom phone.
  2. All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when students are not working at their computer.
  3. Students are allowed to use music devices at their computer with headphones in one ear only.  Only the student using the PED should be able to hear the music. Students need to hear and respond to the instructor. Students’ consequences will follow the student code of conduct as well as having a deduction on their employability sheet.

Academics  

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final Year Math Related Credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

Perfect Attendance

Outstanding Attendance

Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)

Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

Job Placement assistance is available.

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college.

Course Schedule - (Sequence and assignments are subject to change)

 

MP 1

Industry Overview: Lecture/Handouts
Safety:  Safety/Lab Tour: Tools/Equipment, Safety Test I, Safety Test II
Intro to Design: Desktop Designs
Color Theory: Color Wheel
Typography: Type Classification, Typestyles Test, Expressing Moods
Intro Computer: Intro to Mac, Computer Check Off
Intro to InDesign: Id Tools I & II, InDesign Logos
Intro to Illustrator: Vector Logos, Face Type
Intro to Photoshop:  Self Portrait
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Write 1

MP 2

Traditional Illustration: Pen and Ink, Colored Pencil
Digital Illustration: Descriptive Type
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Write 2
Academics: CareerReady 101 Pre-Test, Math / Reading

MP 3

3D Rendering & Modeling: Bryce 1, Bryce 2, Bryce 3
Design and Layout: Logo Design, Business Card Design
Mid-Term Exam: Midterm Practical, Midterm Written
Test: Final
Leadership: Participation/Technical, Skills, Classroom Tours
Employability: Daily log sheet
Academic: Write 3

MP 4

Design/Development: Thumbnails / Roughs / Comps, Logo Shapes, Logo Initials
Advanced Design/InDesign: Poster of a Designer
Portfolio: Grand Canyon Newsletter, Arson Poster
Competition/Portfolio: Garlic Poster
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Write 4

MP 5

Web Design/Interactive Media: Simple Interactive, Interactive Portfolio, Flash Projects
Advanced Design/Photoshop: Extremism Poster
Advanced Design/Illustrator: Resume Layout, T-Shirt Design, Playing Card T-Shirt Design
Advanced Image Output: Roland Vinyl Cutter
Leadership: Participation/Technical Skills, Classroom Tours
Academics / Math: Building Goal - Top 5 missed Questions, Practice & Post Test
Employability: Daily log sheet
Academic: Write 5

MP 6

Advanced Image Output: Heat Transfer T-Shirts
Advanced Design/Photoshop: Artwork for Silk Screen
Advanced Image Output / Advanced Finishing: Screen Preparation, Silk Screen Shirt Final
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Write 6
Final Exam: Practice/Terms/Exam

Absences / Tardies

Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student / employee learning and productivity.  This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.

  1. Absences will effect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.
  2. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the student can NOT earn a Certificate of Completion.
  3. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  4. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.  If tardy, students may still earn points for work accomplished that day.  Students are expected to call the instructor and arrive as soon as possible, ready to learn.
  5. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale

100%           = A+
94 - 99%     = A
90 - 93%     = A-
87 - 89%    = B+
84 - 86%     = B
80 - 83%     = B-
77 - 79%     = C+
74 - 76%     = C
70 - 73%     = C-
67 - 69%     = D+
64 - 66%     = D
60 - 63%     = D-
0 - 59%    = E

Grading Outline
 

  • Employability & Attendance = 35%
  • Projects, Worksheets, & Vocabulary = 45%
  • Tests & Quizzes = 20%
  • Total Grading Scale = 100%

Grade Posting

Grades will be posted in Zangle and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, use of personal phone, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for calling the instructor). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Days Absent
(per 6wk marking period
  Employability Grade
(35% Maximum)
0 30 - 35% A
1 25 - 29% A-
2 15 - 24% B
3 5 - 14% C
4+  0 -   4% D to E

 

Employability Grade will reflect accumulative absences for the semester.

Projects, WorkSheets and Vocabulary

Each project (assignment sheet) has the grading scale and rubric on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Late and Make-up Work

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late. After 5 days the student will receive no more than 50%.  After 7 days the student will receive a zero.

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called the instructor or parent has called the instructor) the student is may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor.  This could possibly be before or after school.  Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Parents/Guardians

Please fill out the following forms given to your son/daughter and return the next school day:

  • Emergency Card
  • Safety Pledge / Student/Parent Consent/Release Form
  • Course Syllabus (this document)

I am pleased to speak with parents anytime. Students have my business card.  Additional business cards and an additional copy of this syllabus are available upon request.


 

Graphic Design II Syllabus

Graphic Design II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Instructors: Mark Benglian / Shirley Byrd
Phone: 734-419-2101 / 734-419-2147
E-mail: benglianm@wwcsd.net / byrds@wwcsd.net

CIP: 10.0301 - Graphic & Printing Technology - Consolidated
PSN: 14207
Course #: V1020   Graphic Design 2

Office Hours:
Shift 1 -  7:20 am - 10:05 am    Monday - Friday
Shift 2 - 11:10 am - 1:50 pm    Monday - Friday

Segment Q
 

  1. Client-Based Production:  Students will interpret client’s needs, give an estimate, develop a budget, order materials, produce a production plan, prepare artwork, provide a client proof, produce tangible items for the client, and initiate invoicing.
  2. Scholarships:  Students will be expected to research opportunities as well as evaluate, decide, and apply for scholarships.
  3. Competitions:  Students will evaluate rules and regulations, demonstrate understanding and interpret a project brief, critique work, and make recommendations for submissions.
  4. Advanced Hardware Technology:  Students will be introduced to trending hardware technology within our industries. Students will analyze product specifications, request quotes, estimate consumable supplies cost, and justify possible additional equipment.
  5. Advanced Software Technology:  Students will get exposure to the ever-changing array of software applications being used in the industry. Students will determine capability gaps in our current software, analyze software licensing costs, evaluate workflows that each given software could provide, and ultimately advanced project workflows within our current suite of programs. Students may also assess possible opportunities for certification in specific programs such as the Adobe Certified Expert Program.
  6. Advanced Methods and Materials:  Students will explore new substrates and production processes. Students will acquire samples of non-traditional materials for experimental applications. Students will hypothesize opportunities to employ new methods and materials as a vehicle to cut costs, increase revenue, obtain an additional experience or skill, and/or expand list of provided services to clients.
  7. Post-Secondary Opportunities / Employment Opportunities:  Students will compare opportunities for advancement in Post-Secondary Education versus the job outlook for non-post-secondary routes into the industry. Students will evaluate costs of higher education, and assess rates of income for graduates vs non-graduates within the industry.
  8. Entrepreneurship:  Students will investigate entrepreneurial opportunities within the industry.
  9. Independent Project Management:  Students will be expected to develop individual work for self and/or client with an understanding of deadlines and maintain a schedule to produce the end product within those structured parameters.
  10. Self-Promotional Marketing:  Students will explore, research, and develop ways to market themselves through written and visual work to be used for advancement in education and/or employment.
  11. Professional Portfolio Development:  Students will develop individual pieces that will collectively produce a portfolio. Students will explore various ways to display their work in electronic form as well as in print.

Course Description

Advance students develop a professional portfolio, related to employment in Graphics Arts with emphases on design. Students market themselves through social media and other online venues, explore new software technology and advance techniques in Adobe Creative Suite. Students apply for scholarships, participate in graphics competitions and work-based learning experiences. Students manage production work within the classroom; working with clients / customers and produce professional work from beginning to end.  Students rotate where needed to complete jobs, but may choose to spend most of their time specializing in one department to advance their skill level for employment and/or post-secondary level.

Leadership and Competitions

Students are encouraged to participate in various leadership activities: SkillsUSA membership and SkillsUSA competitions, various design contest such as the North American International Auto Show Poster Contest, I-Save Poster, Shirt Designs, and Scholastic Art Awards.

Course Materials/Resources

Students will use Macintosh Computers with the following software:  Adobe CC: InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator; Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint. Students will use the internet to research design samples, client needs and software tutorials. Students will download fonts to upload on their computers.

Recommended Student Supplies

Flash Drive to back up student computer work.

Course Requirements / Work Based Learning

Students will be required to do an off campus Business/Industry Visitation (Work Based Learning).  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a graphics business.  Students will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the Instructor regarding the experience.

Dress Code

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford Career-Tech Dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, Graphics students are not allowed to wear open toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford Career-Tech Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED)
 

  • No Cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the Graphics/Printing classroom. For Emergencies Students and Parents may use the classroom phone.
  • All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when students are not working at their computer.
  • Students are allowed to use music devices at their computer with headphones in one ear only.  Only the student using the PED should be able to hear the music. Students need to hear and respond to the instructor. Students’ consequences will follow the student code of conduct.

Absences / Tardies

Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student / employee learning and productivity.  This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.  

  1. Absences will effect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.  
  2. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the student can NOT earn a Certificate of Completion.
  3. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  4. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.  If tardy, students may still earn points for work accomplished that day.  Students are expected to call the instructor and arrive as soon as possible, ready to learn.
  5. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale

100%         = A+
94 - 99%     = A
90 - 93%     = A-
87 - 89%    = B+
84 - 86%     = B
80 - 83%     = B-
77 - 79%    = C+
74 - 76%     = C
70 - 73%     = C-
67 - 69%     = D+
64 - 66%     = D
60 - 63%     = D-
0 - 59%    = E

Days Absent
(per 6wk marking period)
  Employability Grade
(35% Maximum)
0 30 - 35% A
1 25 - 29% A-
2 15 - 24%  B
3 5 - 14% C
4+ 0 -   4% D to E

            

Employability Grade will reflect accumulative absences for the semester.

Grading Outline

Employability & Attendance = 35%
Projects, Worksheets, & Vocabulary = 45%
Tests & Quizzes = 20%
Total Grading Scale = 100%

Grade Posting

Grades will be posted in Zangle and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for calling the instructor). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Projects, WorkSheets and Vocabulary

Each project (assignment sheet) has the grading scale and rubric on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Late and Make-up Work

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late. After 5 days the student will receive no more than 50%.  After 7 days the student will receive a zero.

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called the instructor or parent has called the instructor) the student is may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Course Schedule - (Sequence and assignments are subject to change)

 

MP 1

  • Industry Overview: Research/Write
  • Safety: Safety/Lab Tour, Tools/Equipment, Safety Test
  • Typography: Typography Poster
  • Photoshop: Reggae Poster, Arson Poster
  • Illustrator: Logo Design
  • InDesign: Advisory Invitation
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet
  • Academic: Write 1

MP 2

  • Advance Color Theory: Color Print / Web / Spot,     Pantone, Color Test
  • Portfolio / Contests: I-Save Poster, Logo Designs
  • Academics: CareerReady 101 Pre-Test, Math / Reading
  • Academics / Writes: Write 2
  • Portfolio / Independent Projects: Logos
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 3    

  • Independent Study: Portfolio Work, Photoshop Posters, Illustrator Logo Designs, Vinyl Shirt Designs
  • Academics / Math: Convert Measurements
  • Mid-Term Tests: Practical, Written
  • Competitions: Scholastic Arts
  • Academics / Write: Write 3
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 4

  • Illustrator/Portfolio: Advance Pen drawings
  • Portfolio Work / Advanced Design: Arson Poster, DAFT Poster
  • Competition: Garlic Poster
  • Competitions: Scholastic Arts
  • Academics / Write: Write 4
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 5

  • Web Design / Interactive Media: Simple Interactive
  • Advanced Design / Competition / Portfolio: SAE Poster
  • Advanced Illustrator: Wild Logo
  • Portfolio: Playing Card T-Shirt Design
  • Advanced Image Output:  etup / Run Roland Vinyl Cutter
  • Academics / Writes: Write 5
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 6

  • Advanced Image Output: Heat Transfer T-Shirts
  • Advanced Design / Photoshop: Artwork for Screen Printing
  • Advanced Image Output / Advanced Finishing Operations Portfolio: Screen Preparation, Screen Print Shirt Final
  • Academics / Writes: Write 6
  • Academics / Writes: Scholarship Applications

Academics

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final Year Math Related Credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

Job Placement assistance is available.

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor.  This could possibly be before or after school.  Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Parents/Guardians

Please fill out the following forms given to your son/daughter and return the next school day:

  • Emergency Card
  • Safety Pledge / Student/Parent Consent/Release Form
  • Course Syllabus (this document)

I am pleased to speak with parents anytime. Students have my business card.  Additional business cards and an additional copy of this syllabus are available upon request.

 

Graphic/Printing Communications I & II

Graphic/Printing Communications I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Students are exposed to all aspects of the graphics industry. Emphasis is placed on computer design, color, typography, composition, preflighting, and apparel preparation and production. Students will be exposed to computer-to-plate imaging, operating offset presses, bindery and finishing equipment. Printing methods include; offset, digital, dye-sublimation, vinyl sign making, and thermal apparel. Students design and print their own logos, business cards, greeting cards, stationery, flyers, coffee mugs, key chains, hoodies and T-shirts. First year students work with advance students and can excel in the customer production area.

Graphic/Printing Communications II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Printing Technology I and instructor's recommendation.

Advanced students are in charge of running a printing business within the classroom. They work with customers, fill out work orders, produce real printed jobs, learn estimating, inventory, basic equipment maintenance. Students will be expected to take a leadership role in the program. Students rotate where needed to complete jobs, but may choose to spend most of their time specializing in one department to advance their skill level for employment.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Industry safety standards
  • Printers measurements
  • Graphic/printing terminology
  • Typography
  • Designing page layouts
  • Preflighting
  • File management
  • Basic computer troubleshooting
  • Computer-to-plate imaging
  • Spot, process and Pantone colors
  • Operating offset presses
  • Troubleshooting
  • Bindery and finishing operations
  • Copyright/ethics
  • Dye sublimation printing
  • Design and production of apparel art
  • Sign making
  • Employability

Promotional Equipment:
 

  • Hotronix Heat press
  • Knight K-3 Ceramic mug press
  • Roland Camm-1 Servo vinyl cutter

Prepress Software/Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Adobe InDesign CC
  • Adobe Photoshop CC
  • Adobe Illustrator CC
  • Adobe Acrobat CC
  • Cut-Studio-Vinyl Sign
  • Scanners
  • Digital cameras

Press/Finishing Equipment:
 

  • Heidelberg QM 46-2
  • Standard Horizon 16 bin Collator- air/vacuum/stitcher/folder/face trim
  • Challenge 30” paper cutter
  • Challenge drill
  • Interlake stitcher
  • Baum ultra-folder
  • Shrink wrapper

Occupational Options:
 

  • Graphic Designer
  • Electronic Publisher/Page Layout Artist
  • Digital Imaging Specialist
  • Electronic Prepress/Preflight Operator
  • Press Operator/Press Assistant
  • Material Handler
  • Shipping and Distribution Manager
  • Bindery and Finishing Operator
  • Screen Printer
  • Vinyl Sign Maker
  • Quality Control Specialist
  • Customer Service Representative
  • Graphic/Printing Sales Representative
  • Owner/Entrepreneur
  • Plant Manager
  • Mechanic Technician
  • Paper Scientist
  • Bindery Technician

 

Graphic/Printing Communications I Syllabus

Graphic Printing Communications I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 10.0301 - Graphic & Printing Technology - Consolidated
PSN: 14207
Course: V1510 Graphic/Print Tech 1

Instructor: Shirley Byrd
E-mail: byrds@wwcsd.net
Phone: 734-419-2147

Office Hours:
Shift 1 -  7:20 am - 10:05 am     Monday - Friday
Shift 2 - 11:10 am - 1:50 pm     Monday - Friday

State Consolidated Standards
 

  1. Academic Foundations
  2. Communications
  3. Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking
  4. Information Technology Applications
  5. Systems
  6. Safety, Health and Environmental
  7. Leadership and Teamwork
  8. Ethics and Legal Responsibilities
  9. Employability and Career Development
  10. Technical Skills
  11. Printing Pathway

State Segments
 

  1. Industry Overview
  2. Safety and Health
  3. Intro to Design and Image Development
  4. Introduction to Image Output
  5. Introduction to Finishing Operations
  6. Employability Skills and Portfolio
  7. Applied Academics
  8. New Media, Advanced Design and Image Level
  9. Leadership
  10. Advance Image Output
  11. Advanced Finishing Operations
  12. Project Management

Course Description

The Graphic Design/Print program exposes students to all aspects of the graphics industry with emphasis on design and production. Software and skills taught include: typography, color theory, design and layout, computer sign making, InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Cut Studio Vinyl Sign software, dye sublimation printing, vinyl sign making and heat transfer vinyl for apparel, computer-to-plate preparation, operating offset presses and bindery equipment. Students create logos, business cards, greeting cards, buttons, posters, coffee mugs, T-shirts and hoodies.  As training progresses, students work on “real customers” jobs including logos, flyers, prom tickets, invitations and apparel.

Leadership and Competitions

Students are encouraged to participate in various leadership activities: SkillsUSA membership and SkillsUSA competitions, various design contest such as the North American International Auto Show Poster Contest, I-Save Poster, Shirt Designs, and Scholastic Art Awards.

Course Materials/Resources

Students will use Macintosh Computers with the following software:  Adobe CC: InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator; Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint. Students will use the internet to research design samples, client needs and software tutorials. Students will download fonts to upload on their computers.

Recommended Student Supplies  

Flash Drive to back up student computer work.

Course Requirements

Students will be required to do an off campus Business/Industry Visitation (Work Based Learning).  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a graphics business.  Students will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/ guardian’s signed permission, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the Instructor regarding the experience.

Dress Code

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford Career-Tech Dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, Graphics students are not allowed to wear open toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford Career-Tech Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED)
 

  • No Cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the Graphics/Printing classroom. For Emergencies Students and Parents may use the classroom phone.
  • All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when students are not working at their computer.
  • Students are allowed to use music devices at their computer with headphones in one ear only.  Only the student using the PED should be able to hear the music. Students need to hear and respond to the instructor. Students’ consequences will follow the student code of conduct as well as having a deduction on their employability sheet.

Academics  

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final Year Math Related Credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion

Each student will receive a Competency printout ranking the technical skills completed in the program.  Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

Job Placement assistance is available.

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college.

Course Schedule (Sequence and assignments are subject to change)

 

MP 1
 

  • Safety: Safety / Lab Tour; Tools / Equipment; Safety Test I; Safety Test II
  • Typography: Typeface 1, 2, 3, & 4; Typestyles Test; Expressing Moods
  • Intro Computer: Intro to Mac; Computer Check Off
  • Intro InDesign: Id Tools I & II; Self Portrait
  • Intro Illustrator: Hoodie Notes; Hoodie Design
  • Intro Output/Vinyl: Intro to load
  • Color Theory: Color Wheel; Color Print / Web / Spot; Pantone; Color Test I & II
  • Academics / Writes: Write 1
  • Employability: Daily Employability Sheet

MP 2
 

  • Intro Photoshop: Melonhead/Selection Tools
  • Into Design: Expressive Type
  • Intro Design/Typography: Textured Backgrounds
  • Intro Design/InDesign: I-Save Poster
  • Academics: CareerReady 101; Pre-Test     Math / Reading
  • Academics / Writes: Write 2
  • Intro Design/Illustrator: Logos - Tag Lines
  • Intro Design/Illustrator: Bug
  • Employability: Daily Employability Sheet

MP 3
 

  • Advanced Design/Output: Greeting Card
  • Intro Finishing: Greeting Card / Scoring
  • Advance Design: Variable Data Printing
  • Academics: CareerReady 101; Pre-Test Math / Reading
  • InDesign: Id Frame/Photos/Placement
  • Academics / Math: E-Scale / Measurements
  • Academics / Writes: Write 3 & 4
  • Output/Paper Knowledge: Paper Knowledge; Paper Grain / Grain Usage; Paper Test I & II
  • Mid-Term Exam: Practice/Terms/Exam
  • Employability: Daily Employability Sheet

MP 4
 

  • Illustrator: Intro Pen Tool, Hearts, Lines; Pear drawing; Illustrator Test
  • Leadership: SkillsUSA – Membership / Meetings / Technical Skills; Building Tour Guides
  • Design/Development: Thumbnails / Roughs / Comps; Logo Shapes; Logo Initials; Business Cards; Envelopes; Stationery
  • Academics / Math: Cut Size Sheets / Parent Sheets; Ratios / Estimating Materials; Time / Hourly Rate
  • Academics / Writes: Write 5
  • Advance Design / Output: Preflight I, 2, & 3
  • Employability: Daily Employability Sheet

MP 5
 

  • Advance Design: Setting up Grids; Ice Cream Magazine Spread; Thumbnails/Rough/ Layout
  • Academics / Math: Building Goal - Top 5 missed Questions; Practice & Post Test
  • Academics / Math: Advance Estimating; Ratios / Estimating Materials; Time / Hourly Rate; Cut Size Sheets Test
  • Leadership: SkillsUSA Technical Skills Training
  • Academics / Writes: Write 6
  • Employability: Daily Employability Sheet

MP 6
 

  • Leadership / Design: I-Save Poster Contest
  • Advance Employability: Resume / References; Interviewing
  • Advance Output / Problem Solving: Dye Sublimation Printing; Mugs, Dog Tags, Phone Cases
  • Project Management: Job Tickets; Customer Production
  • Final Exam: Practice/Terms/Exam
  • Employability: Daily Employability Sheet

Absences / Tardies

Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student / employee learning and productivity.  This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.  

  1. Absences will effect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.  
  2. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the student can NOT earn a Certificate of Completion.
  3. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  4. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.  If tardy, students may still earn points for work accomplished that day.  Students are expected to call the instructor and arrive as soon as possible, ready to learn.
  5. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale

100%    = A+
94 - 99%    = A
90 - 93%    = A-
87 - 89%    = B+
84 - 86%    = B
80 - 83%    = B-
77 - 79%    = C+
74 - 76%    = C
70 - 73%    = C-
67 - 69%    = D+
64 - 66%    = D
60 - 63%    = D-
0 - 59%    = E

Grading Outline

Employability & Attendance = 35%
Projects, Work Sheets, & Vocabulary = 45%
Tests & Quizzes = 20%
Total Grading Scale = 100%

Grade Posting

Grades will be posted in Zangle and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area.  Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, use of personal phone, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for calling the instructor). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Days Absent (per marking period)    
0 30 – 35% A
1 25 – 29% A-
2 15 – 24% B
3 5 – 14% C
4  0 – 4%  D to E

 

Employability grade will reflect accumulative absences for the semester.

Projects, WorkSheets and Vocabulary

Each project (assignment sheet) has the grading scale and rubric on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Late and Make-up Work

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late. After 5 days the student will receive no more than 50%.  After 7 days the student will receive a zero.

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called the instructor or parent has called the instructor) the student is may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor.  This could possibly be before or after school.  Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Parents/Guardians

Please fill out the following forms given to your son/daughter and return the next school day:

  • Emergency Card
  • Safety Pledge / Student/Parent Consent/Release Form
  • Course Syllabus (this document)

I am pleased to speak with parents anytime. Students have my business card.  Additional business cards and an additional copy of this syllabus are available upon request.

Graphic/Printing Communications II Syllabus

Graphic/Printing Communications II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 10.0301 - Graphic & Printing Technology - Consolidated
PSN: 14207
Course: V1420 Graphic/Print Tech II

Onstructor: Shirley Byrd
Phone: 734-419-2147
E-mail: byrds@wwcsd.net

Office Hours:
Shift 1 -  7:20 am - 10:05 am     Monday - Friday
Shift 2 - 11:10 am - 1:50 pm     Monday - Friday

State Consolidated Standards
 

  1. Academic Foundations
  2. Communications
  3. Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking
  4. Information Technology Applications
  5. Systems
  6. Safety, Health and Environmental
  7. Leadership and Teamwork
  8. Ethics and Legal Responsibilities
  9. Employability and Career Development
  10. Technical Skills
  11. Printing Pathway

Segment Q
 

  1. Self Promotion; Professional Portfolio, Marketing
  2. Scholarships
  3. Competitions
  4. Independent Project Management
  5. Client-based Production
  6. Advanced Technology and Software

Course Description

Advance students develop a professional portfolio, related to employment in Graphics Arts with emphases on production. Students market themselves through social media and other online venues, explore new software technology and advance techniques in Adobe Creative Suite. Students apply for scholarships, participate in graphics competitions and work-based learning experiences. Students manage production work within the classroom; working with clients / customers, fill out work orders, produce professional work from beginning to end, estimate and track inventory.  Students rotate where needed to complete jobs, but may choose to spend most of their time specializing in one department to advance their skill level for employment and/or post-secondary level.

Leadership and Competitions

Students are encouraged to participate in various leadership activities: SkillsUSA membership and SkillsUSA competitions, various design contest such as the North American International Auto Show Poster Contest, I-Save Poster, Shirt Designs, and Scholastic Art Awards.

Course Materials/Resources

Students will use Macintosh Computers with the following software:  Adobe CC: InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator; Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint. Students will use the internet to research design samples, client needs and software tutorials. Students will download fonts to upload on their computers.

Recommended Student Supplies

Flash Drive to back up student computer work.

Course Requirements

Students will be required to do an off campus Business/Industry Visitation (Work Based Learning).  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a graphics business.  Students will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/ guardian’s signed permission, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the Instructor regarding the experience.

Dress Code

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford Career-Tech Dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, Graphics students are not allowed to wear open toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford Career-Tech Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED)
 

  • No Cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the Graphics/Printing classroom. For Emergencies Students and Parents may use the classroom phone.
  • All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when students are not working at their computer.
  • Students are allowed to use music devices at their computer with headphones in one ear only.  Only the student using the PED should be able to hear the music. Students need to hear and respond to the instructor. Students’ consequences will follow the student code of conduct.

Academics

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final Year Math Related Credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

Job Placement assistance is available.

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college.

Course Schedule - (Sequence and assignments are subject to change)

 

MP 1

 

  • Safety: Safety / Tools / Equipment;     Safety Test I
  • Advance Typography: Typestyles History; Typestyles Test
  • Advance Color Theory: Color Print / Web / Spot; Pantone; Color Test
  • Advance Photoshop: Book Image/Selection Tools
  • Advance Illustrator / Independent Projects: Logos for Vinyl - Layers
  • Project Management: Follow customer jobs; Fill out job tickets
  • Project Management / Advance Output: Setup / Operate Vinyl Cutter
  • Leadership: Assist / Check off First Year
  • Academics / Writes: Write 1
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 2

 

  • Portfolio / Contests: I-Save Poster
  • Academics: CareerReady 101 Pre-Test; Math / Reading
  • Academics / Writes: Write 2
  • Portfolio / Independent Projects: Logos
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 3

 

  • Advance Illustration: Greeting Card
  • Advance Design /Output: Greeting Card / Booklet
  • Intro Finishing: Greeting Card / Scoring
  • Advance Design: Variable Data Printing
  • Academics: CareerReady 101 Pre-Test; Math / Reading
  • Academics / Math: Convert Measurements
  • Academics / Writes: Write 3 & 4
  • Client-based / Output / Paper Knowledge Paper Knowledge: Paper Grain / Grain Usage
  • Mid-Term Exam: Practice/Terms/Exam
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 4

 

  • Illustrator/Portfolio: Advance Pen Drawings
  • Competitions / Leadership: SkillsUSA – Membership / Meetings / Technical Skills
  • Design/Image Development: Thumbnails / Roughs / Comps
  • Portfolio: Self-Promotional Set
  • Academics / Math: Cut Size Sheets / Parent Sheets; Ratios / Estimating Materials; Time / Hourly Rate
  • Academics / Writes: Write 5
  • Advance Design / Output: Advance Preflight/ Advance Tech & Software Problem Solving
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 5

 

  • Advance Software / Competitions: Setting up Grids; Ice Cream Magazine Spread; Thumbnails / Rough / Layout
  • Academics / Math: Building Goal - Top 5 missed Questions; Practice & Post Test
  • Academics / Math: Advance Estimating; Ratios / Estimating Materials; Time / Hourly Rate
  • Competitions: SkillsUSA Technical Skills Training
  • Academics / Writes: Write 6
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

MP 6

 

  • Competitions:  I-Save Poster Contest
  • Advance Employability:  Resume / References; Interviewing
  • Advance Output / Client-Based Production: Dye Sublimation Printing;     Mugs, Dog Tags, Phone Cases
  • Project Management / Client-Based Production: Job Tickets; Customer Printing Production
  • Final Exam: Practice/Terms/Exam
  • Employability: Daily Log Sheet

Absences / Tardies

Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student / employee learning and productivity.  This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.  

  1. Absences will effect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.  
  2. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the student can NOT earn a Certificate of Completion.
  3. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  4. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.  If tardy, students may still earn points for work accomplished that day.  Students are expected to call the instructor and arrive as soon as possible, ready to learn.
  5. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale

100%        = A+
94 - 99%    = A
90 - 93%    = A-
87 - 89%    = B+
84 - 86%    = B
80 - 83%    = B-
77 - 79%    = C+
74 - 76%    = C
70 - 73%    = C-
67 - 69%    = D+
64 - 66%    = D
60 - 63%    = D-
0 - 59%    = E

Grading Outline

Employability & Attendance = 35%
Projects, Work Sheets, & Vocabulary = 45%
Tests & Quizzes = 20%
Total Grading Scale = 100%

Grade Posting

Grades will be posted in Zangle and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area.  Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, use of personal phone, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for calling the instructor). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Days Absent (per marking period)    
0 30 – 35% A
1 25 – 29% A-
2 15 – 24% B
3 5 – 14% C
4+ 0 – 4% D to E

 

Employability grade will reflect accumulative absences for the semester.

Projects, Work Sheets and Vocabulary

Each project (assignment sheet) has the grading scale and rubric on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Late and Make-up Work

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late. After 5 days the student will receive no more than 50%.  After 7 days the student will receive a zero.

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called the instructor or parent has called the instructor) the student is may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor.  This could possibly be before or after school.  Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Parents/Guardians

Please fill out the following forms given to your son/daughter and return the next school day:

  • Emergency Card
  • Safety Pledge / Student/Parent Consent/Release Form
  • Course Syllabus (this document)

I am pleased to speak with parents anytime. Students have my business card.  Additional business cards and an additional copy of this syllabus are available upon request.

 

Health Occupations I & II

Health Occupations I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to provide students with a better understanding of and appreciation for the health care field. This program will provide the skills necessary to give basic bedside care to patients. Students will be exposed to a variety of careers within the healthcare system. Students are also provided with a “hands-on” experience during the mandatory clinical experience.

Students are required to have a uniform, a current physical examination, tuberculin test and Hepatitis B vaccine. An influenza vaccine is strongly recommended.

Health Occupations II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Health Occupations I and instructor's recommendation.

This program provides the student who is interested in preparing for a career in nursing, or other patient care areas, a greater opportunity for increasing skills and comfort with patient care. A uniform, physical exam, tuberculin test and Hepatitis B vaccine are required for both programs. In addition, HO2 students are required to have a urine drug screen.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements. Students who successfully complete the program and state examinations will be certified by the state as a Nursing Assistant. Qualified students may have an opportunity for extended clinical experience.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Infection control
  • Medical terminology + abbreviations
  • Anatomy and physiology – 12 Systems
  • CNA Program
  • AHA First Aid
  • Observations and communication skills
  • Vital signs
  • Moving, lifting, positioning patients
  • AHA BLS f Rehabilitation techniques
  • Ethics and legal responsibilities
  • Isolation techniques
  • Stress management
  • Glucometers, lab draw
  • Catheterization,
  • Oral Suction, Tracheostomy Care
  • Wound Dressing Techniques
  • Sterilization
  • Advanced patient care skills
  • Sterile gloves
  • Pediatrics
  • Obstetrics

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Sphygmomanometers/stethoscopes
  • Hoyer lift/ambulation aids
  • Hospital beds
  • Patient care equipment
  • Paraffin baths
  • CPR mannequins

Occupational Options:
 

  • Dietary Aide
  • Physical Therapy Aide
  • Occupational Therapy Aide
  • Nurses Assistant
  • Home Health Aide (advanced)
  • Veterinary Assistant (advanced)
  • Lab Assistant
  • Unit Clerk

Health Occupations I Syllabus

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS 1

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Location: Westland, MI
Term: Full year program

Days and Times: Monday – Friday
7:25am – 10:05am or 11:10am – 1:50pm

Office Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday
2:00pm-2:30pm

Prerequisites:
Negative TB Skin Test
Physical Exam with no weight restrictions
*Anatomy & Physiology recommended but not required

Instructors:
Ms. Monica Kaput, RN, MSN, CPN
Mrs. Rosemary Tappan, RN    

Phone Numbers:
734-419-2136 – Ms. Kaput
734-419-2105 – Mrs. Tappan

Fax Number: 734-595-2127

Email: kaputm@wwcsd.net / tappanr@wwcsd.net

*All students are required to have: Uniform, background checks, urine drug screen (if clinical site requires it), Hepatitis B vaccine, flu vaccine (if clinical site requires it) and physical exam.  More information on this will be given at the start of the school year.

Health Occupations I is a program designed to provide students with a better understanding of and appreciation for the health care field.  Students will be exposed to career options in healthcare in order to make an informed career choice.  This program will provide the skills necessary to give basic bedside care to patients.   Students will be provided “hands on” experience in the nursing home setting for the mandatory clinical experience.  Students will also learn basic medical abbreviations, medical terminology, infection control, anatomy and physiology, communication and patient safety.

College Credit Information

Health Occupations students may be able to earn college credits.  Contact your school of interest in order to determine the specific qualifications for college credit.

Core Curriculum Standards

 

Semester 1 Segments:

 

Segment 1 Academic Foundations

  • anatomy and physiology
  • medical math
  • biomedical therapies
  • disease management

Segment 2 Communications

  • medical terminology and abbreviations
  • verbal, nonverbal and written communication skills
  • healthcare documentations

Segment 3 Systems

  • healthcare delivery systems
  • payment options for healthcare

Segment 5 Legal Responsibilities

  • legal implications and practices

Segment 6 Ethics

  • ethical boundaries
  • ethical practices
  • cultural, social and ethnic diversity

Segment 7 Safety Practices

  • infection control
  • personal safety
  • environmental safety
  • common safety hazards
  • emergency procedures and protocols

Segment 9 Health Maintenance

  • healthy behaviors
  • alternative health practices

Semester 2 Segments:

 

Segment 4 Employability Skills

  • personal traits of healthcare professionals
  • professional behavioral and standards
  • career decision making
  • job seeking skills

Segment 8 Teamwork

  • healthcare teams
  • team member participation
  • Segment 10 Technical Skills
  • vital signs
  • CPR with AED
  • First Aid

Segment 11 Information Technology

  • Health information literacy and skills
  • privacy and confidentiality of health info
  • basic computer literacy skills

Segment 12 Work-based learning

  • observations, tours and guest speakers
  • job shadowing
  • clinicals

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

 

Textbooks

 

Title: Essentials for Nursing Assisting
Author: Sheila A Sorrentino, Bernie Gorek
Edition: 5th Ed. (2014)
ISBN: 978-0-323-11317-5
Publisher: Mosby Elsevier
Required? Yes    

Title: Intro to Medical Terminology
Author: Ann Ehrlich, Carol L. Schroeder
Edition:
ISBN:1-4018-1137-X
Publisher: Thompson Delmar Learning
Classroom resource    

Title: Structure and Function of Body
Author: Gary Thibodeau
Edition: 14th (2012)
ISBN: 978-0-1323-07721-7
Publisher:
Classroom resource

Title: The Human Body in Health and Illness
Author: Barbara Herlihy, Nancy K. Maebius
Edition: 2nd Ed. (2003)
ISBN: 0-7216-9506-X
Publisher: Saunders
Classroom resource

Title: Diversified Health Occupations
Author: Louise Simmers
Edition: 6th edition (2004)
ISBN: 1-4018-14565
Publisher: Thompson Delmar Learning
Classroom resource

Supplemental Materials

Students will receive unit related work and teacher developed materials. Students will need a

3 inch (or larger), 3-ring binder with dividers to organize materials given to them. Pens (variety of colors), pencils, highlighters, planner and notecards are highly recommended for this course.

III. COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
 

  1. Understanding of Anatomy, Physiology and Path physiology
  2. Understanding of Medical Terminology and abbreviations
  3. Completion of the OBRA CNA Nurse Assisting Program
  4. Investigation of Allied Health professions and skills specific to various occupations
  5. Demonstration of conflict resolution, anger management and stress management techniques.
  6. Demonstration of general safety guidelines to protect self and patient.
  7. Development of employability skills, work ethics and professionalism for workplace success.

IV. METHODOLOGY
 

  • Teacher lecture, discussions, presentations, demonstrations and 1:1 interaction with students
  • Student discussion, teamwork challenge activities, role playing, self-reflection, presentations
  • Student required attendance, active participation, employability skills, and laboratory/clinical skills

V. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

 

Student Conduct

Professionalism is required due to the delicacy of the subject material.  Preparing for a future in healthcare is expected.  Under no circumstances will foul language be allowed.

Common rules of courtesy are required towards the instructors as well as classmates or disciplinary actions will be taken.  Insubordination will not be tolerated under any circumstance!

Personal electronic devices are not to be used or seen in the classroom or lab.  If seen, student will put phone in classroom phone jail and lose employability points.  A parent will be called if problem continues and office referrals will be made to assistant principal.  See separate policy.

Sleeping is not permitted at any time during this class.  This includes having head down and/or eyes closed.  Employability grade will be affected.  A parent will be called if problem continues and office referrals will be made to assistant principal.

Thefts of books, equipment or other student belongings, or any abuse of equipment, will result in a suspension and/or removal from the program.

Any physical abuse, verbal or mental abuse of elderly residents will result in disciplinary action and reporting to Adult Protective Services for review, and possible criminal prosecution.  All students and a parent must sign a document stating that no felony charges are in your history as a minor.  This is a state mandate for all health career programs. See separate form.

Student Attendance

You are to arrive ON TIME to class.  Excessive tardies can and will result in disciplinary action.  Any missed classwork due to tardies will NOT be made up and will result in a 0 for that assignment.  Employability grades will be affected if tardy is greater than 15 minutes or excessive tardies occur.

Absences should be called in to my office as well as your own Attendance Office.  My number is: 734-419-2136. Any missed tests resulting from an absence must be made up after school within 1 week or the graded test becomes an E.

Pop Quizzes and classwork on days where a non-school related absence has occurred cannot be made up and will have a score of 0.  Employability grade will be affected by non-school related absences.  Student is still responsible to know any missed content regardless of type of absence.

Project due dates missed during absences are due upon return to school or will receive a score of 0.  Team project due dates missed during absence may not be allowed to be made up if team has already presented.

IT IS THE STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO DISCUSS MISSED CONTENT WITH THE INSTRUCTOR UPON RETURN TO SCHOOL.

Assignments without names will not have a score entered into the gradebook.  If not claimed within a week, no name papers are discarded.

Food and beverages are allowed in the classroom as long as it does not interfere with instruction.  Students must clean up after themselves.  No food or beverages are allowed in the lab or near computer stations.  Instructor can and will exclude food and beverages from classroom if rules are not followed properly.

Employability Grades

Daily employability grades will be included in your overall grade (15% of grade).  Students must actively participate in class and follow classroom rules/expectations to receive full points.  It is an expectation that all students remain professional and positive and participate in teams.  They must assist to properly clean and store equipment and supplies used during class time.  Students can be rewarded with extra employability points by completing extra duties and consistently earning all employability points.  Daily attendance is required!

Students will lose employability points for not following the rules and expectations of the classroom.  Some examples include excessive talking, being off task, rudeness to instructors or classmates, disrupting classmates, being outside of designated area, sleeping, grooming, tardiness or not wearing uniform on required days.  No employability points are rewarded for absences unless it is school related.  Partial credit may be given if student has made contact with instructor PRIOR to class starting.

It is an expectation that students arrive to class prepared to work.  This includes bringing books, pens/pencils, highlighters, paper/notebooks, appropriate handouts and notes.  On lab days, students are required to wear their uniform.  Dress code will be enforced.

Dress Code and Uniforms
 

  • Approved scrub uniforms are required to practice skills and for Clinicals and Tours
    •  White leather sneakers (no canvas shoes are acceptable)
    •     1 pair of stud earrings only with your uniform.  All others must be removed.
    •    No jewelry with your uniform, except a watch.
    •     Visible piercings MUST be removed or have retainers in place
    •    No unnatural colored hair
    •    Hair tied up above shoulders
    •    No excessive make-up or perfume
  • Long, artificial nails and nail polish are not permitted, as they are a safety and health hazard. * Nails must be cut and filed so that they are not seen beyond the fingertips
  • Shirts must cover abdomen
  • Tank tops without a covering shirt are not acceptable
  • Shorts and skirts must be below fingertip length
  • WDF ID MUST be worn for clinicals and tours (cost is $2)

*Please note that students can be excluded from lab practice, tours and clinicals if proper dress code is not followed.  CPR and First Aid certification will be affected if nails interfere with skill validation.  Employability grade will be affected for improper dress code.

Grading Policy

Tests - 30%
Skills - 25%
Weekly employability - 15%
Classroom work - 10%
Homework - 10%
Quizzes - 10%

100    A+
94-99    A
90-93    A-
87-89    B+
84-86    B
80-83    B-
77-79    C+
74-76    C
70-73    C-
67-69    D+
64-66    D
60-63    D-
0-59    E

*More than 1 absence during the Clinical portion of the course will result in removal from Clinical and you will receive and E for the Term.  In addition, the student will forfeit their Certificate of Completion for the program at year-end.  You will not be allowed to continue on into Health Occupations II.  Students can and will be removed from clinicals due to poor performance, disruptive behavior and insubordination etc.

Please note that signed clinical paperwork, physical, TB test, hepatitis B vaccine, flu vaccine (if required by clinical site) and urine drug screen (if required by clinical site) are due the beginning of February in order to be eligible to participate in clinicals.  Costs for these requirements are NOT covered nor reimbursed by WDF.

*Should a student be removed from the health occupations course and transferred to other areas because of poor performance, the student will receive a D for their Term grade, and will not be allowed to schedule himself or herself into Health Occupations II.

Semester Grades

30% First Card Marking
30% Second Card Marking
30% Third Card Marking
10% Semester/Final Exam

Communication about grades and student progress to parents can be done thru report cards, progress reports, email, conferences and phone calls.

Skill Grades

A ‘Competency Grade’ will be given for each skill taught.  Practice the skills for long- term retention.  You will be tested only once on the skill, so come prepared for testing off with the instructors.

Levels are as follows:

  1.     student is competent enough to teach/demonstrate to others the task (95%)
  2.     student can perform the task without assistance (85%)
  3.     student can perform the task with minimal assistance (75%)
  4.     student practiced but did not test off on the task taught (60%)

Certificate of Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with less than a “C” average and/or less than 70% of skills at a level 2.

*Anyone with more than 12 absences for the year will forfeit their Certificate of Completion.

Core Tests in Health Occupations must be passed with 80%.  If Core exams are not passed with 80% they can be retaken within 2 weeks.  Retakes will not be given after the 2-week timeframe.   Please note that original score will NOT change with test retakes.

Nursing Assistant Competency Exams

If Certificate of Completion requirements are not met, students will not receive permission to test at state level for Nursing Assistant Certification.

Nursing Assistant Competencies will be on a “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” basis, according to OBRA’s Michigan Model 1991.  A student must achieve satisfactory status on all skills to qualify for State Nurse Assistant Exams.

Clinical skills as stated under Clinical guidelines must in addition meet 100% proficiency in the nursing skills to meet State Requirements.  A minimum of 24 hours of clinical practice is required.

Cost of the CNA Exam is approximately $178.00, and will be reimbursed to you when employment is secured in a nursing facility.  You must notify your employer so that the paper work to the State can be processed for reimbursement.

Information will be distributed to you in the Spring to students that meet requirements for certificate of completion. There are 2 parts to the exam:  a skills test and a written exam.  You must pass the skills portion before you can take the written test.

*Please note: All students who pass the 2 Sections of the CNA Exam will be filed on the State Registry in Michigan.  Nursing homes who hire you will check this State Registry to verify your status.  Should any abuse of patients occur by you, the facility will notify the State, and your name will be red flagged on the Registry. You will then not be allowed to work as a nursing assistant.

HOSA – Future Health Professionals (formerly Health Occupations Students of America)

HOSA is a student led organization embedded in the course curriculum.  Students are required to participate in this organization.  HOSA membership promotes skill competencies, knowledge and leadership.  Students will be required to participate in at least one community service project and are encouraged to accumulate 10 hours of volunteer hours by the end of January.

Dues - $20.00/year plus fundraising.
Registration for regional competition - $20.00

$40 (as mentioned above) is due by the end of September
(HOLD card placed for fees not paid by this due date)

Fund-raisers are necessary to fund the various competitions in the Spring.  All HOSA members will be asked to participate. If students choose not to fundraise and qualify for state competitions, students will be charged fees for competition.

Student Competition

As members of HOSA, students will be asked to compete at Regional Competition, or write a Term Paper in place of the event.

Only Gold Medal winners move on to the next level of competition (states).  Medal winners earn the right to compete, but may not necessarily be allowed to compete if they do not maintain a C average in class and have less than 8 absences at time of registration.  Any student with a suspension for verbal or physical assault will not be allowed to attend state competition.  They must be in good standing with attendance at the career center as well as at their home school.  In addition, no students who have been suspended may compete at the State Conference.  It will be left to advisor permission to compete at the State and National levels.

The State HOSA Leadership Conference is not a right but a privilege.

Professional behavior should be maintained during class time.  Ultimately, the privilege to attend the State HOSA Leadership Conference is at the discretion of the teacher.

Work-Based Learning

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business relate to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Additional Requirement in the Program

 

  • Proof of a Negative PPD TB skin test, or a negative Chest X-Ray
  • Physical exam without weight limitations
  • Scrub Uniform (approx. $26) and clean white leather shoes
  • Proof of Hepatitis B Vaccines  
  • Urine Drug Screen (if required by clinical site) (approx. $52)
  • Flu vaccine (if required by clinical site)
  • HOSA membership dues and regional competition registration ($40)
  • WDF ID badge ($2)

Thank you for taking the time to review this syllabus.

Please sign and return the next page by due date.

 

Health Occupations II Syllabus

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS II

COURE SYLLABUS 2016-17

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Location: Westland, MI
Term: Full year program

Days and Times:
Monday – Friday
11:10am – 1:50pm

Office Hours:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday
2:00pm-2:30pm    

Prerequisites:
Negative TB Skin Test
Physical Exam with no weight restrictions
Certificate of Completion from Health Occupations 1
Instructor recommendation
*Anatomy & Physiology recommended but not required

Instructor: Ms. Monica Kaput, RN, MSN, CPN

Phone Number: 734-419-2136
E-mail: kaputm@wwcsd.net
Fax Number: 734-595-2127

*All students are required to have: Uniform, background checks, urine drug screen (if clinical site requires it), Hepatitis B vaccine, flu vaccine (if clinical site requires it) and physical exam.  More information on this will be given at the start of the school year

Health Occupations II is a course designed to provide greater opportunity for increasing skills and comfort with patient care.  Students will have opportunity to learn CPR and First Aid as well as enhancing the skills already passed in Health Occupations 1.   Students will complete more challenging clinical opportunities including extended job shadow opportunities in the second semester.  Mentoring and leadership skills are stressed in this course.  HOSA membership and competition are requirements of this course.

Students MUST have Certificate of Completion from Health Occupations 1 to enter into this program.

College Credit Information:

Health Occupations students may be able to earn college credits.  Contact your school of interest in order to determine the specific qualifications for college credit.

Course Standards: The student will:
 

  • Demonstrate proper CPR and First Aid skills
  • Solve basic math problems including conversion problems
  • Employ self-assessment, goal setting and action planning
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of OSHA and HIPAA standards
  • Apply safety and infection control standards in classroom and at clinical
  • Possess knowledge of medical abbreviations
  • Possess knowledge of medical terminology
  • Develop college and workplace readiness skills
  • Exhibit personal integrity
  • Understand the interdependence of the healthcare professions
  • Apply concepts of effective communication
  • Identify ethical and legal issues in the health care system
  • Demonstrate knowledge of anatomy and physiology
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Pediatrics
  • Demonstrate knowledge of Obstetrics
  • Perform proper medication calculation
  • Obtain clinical experience outside the classroom
  • Develop effective leadership qualities and skills
  • Demonstrate sterile technique and follow sterile guidelines
  • Participate in community service activities

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

 

Textbooks

 

Title: Assisting with Patient Care
Author: Sheila A Sorrentino
Edition: 2nd Ed. (2004)
ISBN: 978-0-323-02496-9
Publisher: Mosby Elsevier
Required? Yes    

Title: Intro to Medical Terminology
Author: Ann Ehrlich, Carol L. Schroeder
Edition:
ISBN:1-4018-1137-X
Publisher: Thompson Delmar Learning
Classroom resource

Title: Structure and Function of Body
Author: Gary Thibodeau
Edition: 14th (2012)
ISBN: 978-0-1323-07721-7
Publisher:
Classroom resource

Title: The Human Body in Health and Illness
Author: Barbara Herlihy, Nancy K. Maebius
Edition: 2nd Ed. (2003)
ISBN: 0-7216-9506-X
Publisher: Saunders
Classroom resource

Title: Diversified Health Occupations
Author: Louise Simmers
Edition: 6th edition (2004)
ISBN: 1-4018-14565
Publisher: Thompson Delmar Learning
Classroom resource

Supplemental Materials

Students will receive unit related work and teacher developed materials. Students will need a

3 inch (or larger), 3-ring binder with dividers to organize materials given to them. Pens (variety of colors), pencils, highlighters, planner and notecards are highly recommended for this course.  Regular internet access is required for research and participation in blended class assignments.

III. COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
 

  1. Understanding of Anatomy, Physiology and Path physiology
  2. Understanding of Medical Terminology and abbreviations
  3. Completion of the OBRA CNA Nurse Assisting Program
  4. Investigation of Allied Health professions and skills specific to various occupations.
  5. Demonstration of conflict resolution, anger management and stress management techniques.
  6. Demonstration of general safety guidelines to protect self and patient.
  7. Development of employability skills, work ethics and professionalism for workplace success.

IV. METHODOLOGY

 

  • Teacher lecture, discussions, presentations, demonstrations and 1:1 interaction with students
  • Student discussion, teamwork challenge activities, role playing, self-reflection, presentations
  • Student required attendance, active participation, employability skills, and laboratory/clinical skills

V. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

 

Student Conduct

Professionalism is required due to the delicacy of the subject material.  Preparing for a future in healthcare is expected.  Under no circumstances will foul language be allowed.

Common rules of courtesy are required towards the instructors as well as classmates or disciplinary actions will be taken.  Insubordination will not be tolerated under any circumstance!

Personal electronic devices are not to be used or seen in the classroom or lab.  If seen, student will put phone in classroom phone jail and lose employability points.  A parent will be called if problem continues and office referrals will be made to assistant principal.  See separate policy.

Sleeping is not permitted at any time during this class.  This includes having head down and/or eyes closed.  Employability grade will be affected.  A parent will be called if problem continues and office referrals will be made to assistant principal.

Thefts of books, equipment or other student belongings, or any abuse of equipment, will result in a suspension and/or removal from the program.

Any physical abuse, verbal or mental abuse of elderly residents will result in disciplinary action and reporting to Adult Protective Services for review, and possible criminal prosecution.  All students and a parent must sign a document stating that no felony charges are in your history as a minor.  This is a state mandate for all health career programs. See separate form.

Student Attendance

You are to arrive ON TIME to class.  Excessive tardies can and will result in disciplinary action.  Any missed classwork due to tardies will NOT be made up and will result in a 0 for that assignment.  Employability grades will be affected if tardy is greater than 15 minutes or excessive tardies occur.

Absences should be called in to my office as well as your own Attendance Office.  My number is:  734-419-2136.  Any missed tests resulting from an absence must be made up after school within 1 week or the graded test becomes an E.

Pop Quizzes and classwork on days where a non-school related absence has occurred cannot be made up and will have a score of 0.  Employability grade will be affected by non-school related absences.  Student is still responsible to know any missed content regardless of type of absence.

Project due dates missed during absences are due upon return to school or will receive a score of 0.  Team project due dates missed during absence may not be allowed to be made up if team has already presented.

IT IS THE STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO DISCUSS MISSED CONTENT WITH THE INSTRUCTOR UPON RETURN TO SCHOOL.

Assignments without names will not have a score entered into the gradebook.  If not claimed within a week, no name papers are discarded.

Food and beverages are allowed in the classroom as long as it does not interfere with instruction.  Students must clean up after themselves.  No food or beverages are allowed in the lab or near computer stations.  Instructor can and will exclude food and beverages from classroom if rules are not followed properly.

Employability/Mentoring/Leadership Grades

Daily employability/mentoring/leadership grades will be included in your overall grade (15% of grade).  Students must actively participate in class and follow classroom rules/expectations to receive full employability points.  It is an expectation that all students remain professional and positive and participate in teams.  They must assist to properly clean and store equipment and supplies used during class time.  Students can be rewarded with extra employability points by completing extra duties and consistently earning all employability points.  Daily attendance is required!

Students will lose employability points for not following the rules and expectations of the classroom.  Some examples include excessive talking, being off task, rudeness to instructors or classmates, disrupting classmates, being outside of designated area, sleeping, grooming, tardiness or not wearing uniform on required days.  No employability points are rewarded for absences unless it is school related.  Partial credit may be given if student has made contact with instructor PRIOR to class starting.

Health Occupations 2 students are expected to exhibit leadership/mentoring traits in the course.  They are to be an example for Health Occupations 1 students on a consistent daily basis.  They are also expected to teach their learned skills and concepts to their assigned Health Occupation 1 student.  Daily points are rewarded or lost based on their interactions with classmates in teams or individually.

It is an expectation that students arrive to class prepared to work.  This includes bringing books, pens/pencils, highlighters, paper/notebooks, appropriate handouts and notes.  On lab days, students are required to wear their uniform.  Dress code will be enforced.

Dress Code and Uniforms
 

  • Approved scrub uniforms are required to practice skills and for Clinicals and Tours
    • White leather sneakers (no canvas shoes are acceptable)
    • 1 pair of stud earrings only with your uniform.  All others must be removed.
    • No jewelry with your uniform, except a watch.
    • Visible piercings MUST be removed or have retainers in place
    • No unnatural colored hair
    • Hair tied up above shoulders
    • No excessive make-up or perfume
  • Long, artificial nails and nail polish are not permitted, as they are a safety and health hazard.  *Nails must be cut and filed so that they are not seen beyond the fingertips.
  • Shirts must cover abdomen
  • Tank tops without a covering shirt are not acceptable
  • Shorts and skirts must be below fingertip length
  • WDF ID MUST be worn for clinicals and tours (cost is $2)

*Please note that students can be excluded from lab practice, tours and clinicals if proper dress code is not followed.  CPR and First Aid certification will be affected if nails interfere with skill validation.  Employability grade will be affected for improper dress code.

Grading Policy

Tests - 30%
Skills - 25%
Weekly employability/mentoring and leadership - 15%
Classroom work - 10%
Homework - 10%
Quizzes - 10%    

100    A+
94-99    A
90-93    A-
87-89    B+
84-86    B
80-83    B-
77-79    C+
74-76    C
70-73    C-
67-69    D+
64-66    D
60-63    D-
0-59    E

*More than 1 absence during the Clinical portion of the course will result in removal from Clinical and you will receive and E for the Term.  In addition, the student will forfeit their Certificate of Completion for the program at year-end.  Students can and will be removed from clinicals due to poor performance, disruptive behavior and insubordination etc.  Students removed from clinicals, will not be eligible to complete their health exploration job shadowing experience in semester 2.  Should a student be removed from the health occupations course and transferred to other areas because of poor performance, the student will receive a D for their Term grade.

Please note that signed clinical paperwork, physical, TB test, hepatitis B vaccine, flu vaccine (required by clinical site) and urine drug screen (required by clinical site) are due at the beginning of October in order to be eligible to participate in clinicals.  Costs for these requirements are NOT covered nor reimbursed by WDF.

Urine drug screen process:  Student should bring in $51.50 (cash or credit) to the bookkeeper in the main office at WDF.  She will provide form for Concentra sites (Livonia locations).  Student MUST go to one of the 2 sites listed and provide form and give urine sample.  Results are sent directly to WDF.  No other drug screens will be accepted.

Semester Grades

30% First Card Marking
30% Second Card Marking
30% Third Card Marking
10% Semester/Final Exam

Communication about grades and student progress to parents can be done thru report cards, progress reports, email, conferences and phone calls.

Skill Grades

A ‘Competency Grade’ will be given for each skill taught.  Practice the skills for long- term retention. You will be tested only once on the skill, so come prepared for testing off with the instructors.

Levels are as follows:

  1.     student is competent enough to teach/demonstrate to others the task (95%)
  2.     student can perform the task without assistance (85%)
  3.     student can perform the task with minimal assistance (75%)
  4.     student practiced but did not test off on the task taught (60%)

Certificate of Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with less than a “C” average and/or less than 70% of skills at a level 2.

*Anyone with more than 12 absences for the year will forfeit their Certificate of Completion.

Core Tests in Health Occupations must be passed with 80%.  If Core exams are not passed with 80% they can be retaken within 2 weeks.  Retakes will not be given after the 2-week timeframe.   Please note that original score will NOT change with test retakes.

Completed clinicals and job shadow experience.

Nursing Assistant Competency Exams

If Certificate of Completion requirements are not met, students will not receive permission to test at state level for Nursing Assistant Certification.

Nursing Assistant Competencies will be on a “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” basis, according to OBRA’s Michigan Model 1991.  A student must achieve satisfactory status on all skills to qualify for State Nurse Assistant Exams.

Clinical skills as stated under Clinical guidelines must in addition meet 100% proficiency in the nursing skills to meet State Requirements.  A minimum of 24 hours of clinical practice is required.

Cost of the CNA Exam is approximately $178.00, and will be reimbursed to you when employment is secured in a nursing facility.  You must notify your employer so that the paper work to the State can be processed for reimbursement.

Information will be distributed to you in the Spring to students that meet requirements for certificate of completion. There are 2 parts to the exam:  a skills test and a written exam.  You must pass the skills portion before you can take the written test.

*Please note: All students who pass the 2 Sections of the CNA Exam will be filed on the State Registry in Michigan.  Nursing homes who hire you will check this State Registry to verify your status.  Should any abuse of patients occur by you, the facility will notify the State, and your name will be red flagged on the Registry. You will then not be allowed to work as a nursing assistant.

HOSA – Future Health Professionals (formerly Health Occupations Students of America)

HOSA is a student led organization embedded in the course curriculum.  Students are required to participate in this organization.  HOSA membership promotes skill competencies, knowledge and leadership.  Students will be required to participate in at least one community service project and are encouraged to accumulate 10 hours of volunteer hours by the end of January.

Dues -  $20.00/year plus fundraising.
Registration for regional competition - $20

$40 (as mentioned above) is due by the end of September.
(HOLD card placed for fees not paid by this due date)

Fund-raisers are necessary to fund the various competitions in the Spring.  All HOSA members will be asked to participate. If students choose not to fundraise and qualify for state competitions, students will be charged fees for competition.

Student Competition

As members of HOSA, students will be asked to compete at Regional Competition, or write a Term Paper in place of the event.

Only Gold Medal winners move on to the next level of competition (states).  Medal winners earn the right to compete, but may not necessarily be allowed to compete if they do not maintain a C average in class and have less than 8 absences at time of registration.  Any student with a suspension for verbal or physical assault will not be allowed to attend state competition.  They must be in good standing with attendance at the career center as well as at their home school.  In addition, no students who have been suspended may compete at the State Conference.  It will be left to advisor permission to compete at the State and National levels.

The State HOSA Leadership Conference is not a right but a privilege.

Professional behavior should be maintained during class time.  Ultimately, the privilege to attend the State HOSA Leadership Conference is at the discretion of the teacher.

Extended Job Shadow experience – 2nd Semester

In preparation for the second semester, students are required to secure a site by the beginning of December.  Students will utilize this job shadow in the second semester.  The purpose of the job shadow is to allow students time to shadow a health professional that is currently working in order to expose them to this career, which will allow them to evaluate if this career is one they want to pursue.  More information about this extended experience will be given when job site is secured and approved by instructor.

Math students are required to have 6 hours per week at their job shadow site.  Non-math students are required to have 8 hours per week at their job shadow site.  Students will need reliable transportation to and from their job shadow site as it will not be provided by WDF.

Attendance will be tracked via a time sheet each week.  It will be turned in on Fridays when student is in class at WDF.  Class time will be spent testing on content and skills.  Students are expected to review information posted each week on course sites and come to class on Fridays prepared to test and perform skills.  If hours are missed, they must be made up at the site when they can be accommodated.  Student must contact the site and the instructor before the start of your scheduled job shadow.  Missing 2 scheduled job shadow dates or having 1 no show/no call will result in student being pulled from job shadow experience which will result in an E for that card marking.  Absences with documentation from a doctor’s office/hospital on appropriate letterhead and some special situations will be taken into consideration at the discretion of the instructor.

Additional Requirement in the Program

 

  • Proof of a Negative PPD TB skin test, or a negative Chest X-Ray
  • Physical exam without weight limitations
  • Scrub Uniform (approx. $26) and clean white leather shoes (second set not required)
  • Proof of Hepatitis B Vaccines  
  • Urine Drug Screen (approx. $52)
  • Flu vaccine
  • HOSA membership dues and regional competition registration ($40)
  • WDF ID badge ($2)

Thank you for taking the time to review this syllabus.

Please sign and return the next page by due date.

 

Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration (HVAC) I & II

Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program teaches students diagnosis, maintenance, installation and repair of residential and commercial heating and air conditioning systems. Students will learn safety, basic electricity, electronics, refrigeration, air conditioning/ventilation and the use of test equipment for installation and troubleshooting. Students also learn wiring diagrams, controls and tools. Frequent lab work allows students to apply skills learned in class on real equipment. The curriculum also allows students to use electronic and digital controls for managing energy systems found in large office and industrial buildings.

Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration I and instructor's recommendation.

Students will specialize in solid-state controls on state-of-the-art equipment. They will design, build and install HVAC units. Students will also design and fabricate sheet metal ductwork for their systems in the lab. Students will learn to solder and braze pipe and cut and thread gas pipe. Preparation for E.P.A. license exam is also included.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Basic wiring
  • Schematic identification
  • Sheet metal fabrication/installation
  • Heating/cooling fundamentals
  • Identification/trouble shooting of domestic/commercial heating and cooling systems
  • Pipe cutting, threading, reaming
  • Identification/servicing of hot water heating systems
  • Estimation of heating/cooling leads
  • Boca codes
  • Solid State circuits

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Forced air/hydronic heating trainer
  • Refrigeration system trainers
  • Portable charging and testing units
  • Compressors and vacuum pumps
  • Residential air conditioners
  • Gas and electric furnaces
  • Specialized furnace test equipment
  • Oxyacetylene brazing/welding
  • Heat pumps
  • Electronic ignitions trainers

Occupational Options:
 

  • Oil Burner Service
  • Pipe Cutter
  • Furnace Installer
  • Air Conditioning Installer
  • Sheet Metal Worker
  • Air Conditioning Window Repairer
  • Refrigeration Mechanic
  • Refrigeration Mechanic Assistant
  • Air Conditioning Installer Assistant
  • Heating/Air Conditioning Installer
  • Facilities Maintenance Engineer


 

HVAC I Syllabus

HVAC I

Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP NUMBER: 47.0201
PSN: 14206
Course Number:
V0110
V0110M with Ext Algebra II
V0120
V0120M with Ext Algebra II    

This class meets Fourth Year Math Credit or VPAA requirement for graduation

Instructor: Mr. Shuhdi Alrishood
Office Number: 734-419-2124
Office Hours: 7:20 am – 10:05 am (Monday – Friday)

State Segments:
 

  1. AC/DC Electrical Fundamentals (math formulas)
  2. Safety
  3. Principals of Power Conversion
  4. Documentation/Communication – Blueprint, wiring, diagrams, schematics
  5. Electrical test equipment and measurement – power supplies, meters
  6. Cabling and soldering - conductors
  7. Controls – motors and logic controllers
  8. Tools, fasteners, equipment (safety related)
  9. Prototype and Design and Manufacturing devise analysis
  10. Information Technology Application (specific IT software)
  11. Employability skills, careers, work habits, teamwork
  12. Problem solving and critical thinking

Course Description:

This program teaches students diagnosis, maintenance, installation and repair of residential and commercial heating and air conditioning systems.  Students will learn safety, basic electricity, electronics, refrigeration, air conditioning/ventilation and the use of test equipment for installation and troubleshooting.  Students also learn wiring diagrams, controls and tools.  Frequent lab work allows students to apply skills learned in class on real equipment.  The curriculum also allows for students to use electronic and digital controls for managing energy systems found in large office and industrial buildings.

Dress Code:

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford CTC dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, please make sure you are wearing closed-toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures:

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford CTC Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED):
 

  1. No cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the classroom/lab. For emergencies, students and parents may use the classroom phones.
  2. All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when there is a guest speaker.

Academics:

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final year math related credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion:

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

JOB PLACEMENT IS AVAILABLE IN ADDITION TO THE ANNUAL JOB FAIR

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion of program. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college/university.

Absences/Tardies:

Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student/employee learning and productivity. This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.

  1. Absences will affect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.
  2. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the students can NOT earn a certificate of completion.
  3. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  4. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.
  5. It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale:

100%         = A+
94 – 99%     = A
90 – 93%    = A-
87 – 89%    = B+
84 – 86%    = B
80 – 83%    = B-
77 – 79%    = C+
 74 – 76%    = C
70 – 73%    = C-
76 – 69%    = D+
64 – 66%     = D
 60 – 63%    = D-
0   -  59%    = E

Grading Outline:

Employability and Attendance = 35% of total grade
Projects, Work sheets, & Vocabulary = 45% of total grade
Tests & Quizzes = 20% of total grade
Total = 100%

Grade Posting:

Grades will be posted in MiStar and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability:

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, use of personal phone, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent. Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Late and Make-Up work:

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late.

Tests and Quizzes:

If a student is absent the day of a test, the student may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsibility to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for you. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Based Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Students/Parents/Guardians:

I have read and fully understand the Course Syllabus. I agree to follow the Course and the Career Technical Center policies and expectations to the best of my ability. If I do not follow these policies, I will be held accountable for my actions.


 

Student Signature ___________________________    Date ___________


 

Parent Signature ___________________________   Date ___________


PLEASE ATTACH AND TURN IN TO INSTRUCTOR

 

 

HVAC II Syllabus

HVAC II

Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP NUMBER: 47.0201
PSN: 14206
Course Number:
V0120
V0120M with Ext Algebra II    

This class meets Fourth Year Math Credit or VPAA requirement for graduation

Instructor: Mr. Shuhdi Alrishood
Office Number: 734-419-2124
Office Hours: 7:20 am – 10:05 am (Monday – Friday)

Segment Q Standards:

 

  1. Air Conditioning II
    1. Students will demonstrate the ability to calculate cooling loads.
    2. Students will learn about installation and service of light commercial A.C.
    3. A.C troubleshooting.
    4. Chapters to be covered (29, 30, 31)
  2. Heating system II
    1. Students will learn about calculating heat loads.
    2. Students will learn about heat pumps installation and service.
    3. Students will learn about gas heating systems installation and service.
    4. Chapters to be covered (34, 35, 38)
  3. EPA 608 Certification
    1. Students will be prepared for the EPA 608 exam.
  4. Hydronic Heating Systems fundamentals.
    1. Students will learn about hot water boilers systems, components, installation and service
    2. Students will learn about steam boilers systems, components, installation and service.  
    3. Chapters to be covered (33)
  5. Refrigeration II
    1. Students will learn about domestic refrigeration systems.
    2. Students will learn about commercial refrigeration systems.
    3. Students will learn about defrost methods, installation and service.
    4. Chapters to be covered (17, 42)
  6. Indoor Air quality
    1. Students will learn about air filtration systems.
    2. Students will learn about air purifiers.
    3. Students will learn about air humidification and dehumidification.
    4. Students will learn about air filtration, humidification and dehumidification systems installation and service
    5. Chapters to be covered (22, 24, 28)


Course Description:

This program teaches students diagnosis, maintenance, installation and repair of residential and commercial heating and air conditioning systems.  Students will learn safety, basic electricity, electronics, refrigeration, air conditioning/ventilation and the use of test equipment for installation and troubleshooting.  Students also learn wiring diagrams, controls and tools.  Frequent lab work allows students to apply skills learned in class on real equipment.  The curriculum also allows for students to use electronic and digital controls for managing energy systems found in large office and industrial buildings.

Dress Code:

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford CTC dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, please make sure you are wearing closed-toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures:

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford CTC Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED):

No cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the classroom/lab. For emergencies, students and parents may use the classroom phones.

All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when there is a guest speaker.

Academics:

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final year math related credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion:

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

JOB PLACEMENT IS AVAILABLE IN ADDITION TO THE ANNUAL JOB FAIR

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion of program. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college/university.

Absences/Tardies:

Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student/employee learning and productivity. This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.

  1. Absences will affect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.
  2. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the students can NOT earn a certificate of completion.
  3. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  4. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.
  5. It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale:

100%         = A+
94 – 99%     = A
90 – 93%    = A-
87 – 89%    = B+
84 – 86%    = B
80 – 83%    = B-
77 – 79%    = C+
74 – 76%    = C
70 – 73%    = C-
76 – 69%    = D+
64 – 66%     = D
60 – 63%    = D-
0   -  59%    = E

Grading Outline:

Employability and Attendance = 35% of total grade
Projects, Worksheets, & Vocabulary  = 45% of total grade
Tests & Quizzes = 20% of total grade
Total = 100%

Grade Posting:

Grades will be posted in MiStar and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability:

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, use of personal phone, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent. Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Late and Make-Up work:

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late.

Tests and Quizzes:

If a student is absent the day of a test, the student may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsibility to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for you. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Based Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Students/Parents/Guardians:

I have read and fully understand the Course Syllabus. I agree to follow the Course and the Career Technical Center policies and expectations to the best of my ability. If I do not follow these policies, I will be held accountable for my actions.

 

Student Signature _____________________________        Date _____________


 

Parent Signature _____________________________          Date _____________


PLEASE ATTACH AND TURN IN TO INSTRUCTOR

 

 

Media Production I & II

Media Production I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

In this program, students are introduced to the world of Graphic Communications with a heavy emphasis on Digital Photography. Students will explore portraiture, commercial photography, photojournalism, and photo restoration. Other instruction will include basic fundamentals in the areas of graphic design, digital illustration, advertising, motion graphics, web design, and video. We will utilize many programs offered in the Adobe Creative Cloud such as Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Muse, Premiere, After Effects, Bridge, and more.

Media Production II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Media Production I and instructor’s recommendation.

Students will explore advanced techniques in Digital Photography, and designate a specialization in at least one of the following; Graphic Design, Commercial Photography/Design, Motion Graphics, or Photojournalism. Projects will be complex, and require some self-direction.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • DSLR camera fundamentals
  • Lens care and mounting
  • Determining proper exposure
  • Camera RAW editing
  • Studio lighting
  • Basic photo printing techniques
  • Photo restoration
  • Food/beverage styling
  • Model direction
  • Sports photography
  • Animation/motion graphics
  • Basic video editing
  • Budgeting
  • Portfolio preparation
  • Image manipulation/digital art

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Adobe InDesign CC (software)
  • Adobe Photoshop CC (software)
  • Adobe Illustrator CC (software)
  • Strobe Studio Lighting
  • DSLR cameras (Canon and Sony)
  • Portable lighting
  • Go Pro cameras
  • Array of lenses
  • Canon Pixma Pro-10 photo printers
  • Wacom Tablets

Occupational Options:
 

  • Apprentice Photographer
  • Commercial Photographer
  • Portrait Photographer
  • Sports Photographer
  • Photo Journalist
  • Retoucher
  • Film/Video Editor
  • Animator
  • Photo Restoration
  • Graphic Artist
  • Digital Illustration

Media Production I Syllabus

Media Productions I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

CIP: 10.0301 - Graphic & Printing Technology - Consolidated
PSN: 14207
Course: V1810 Media Production 1

Instructor: Tom Oddi
Phone: 734-419-2125
E-mail: oddite@wwcsd.net

Office Hours:
Shift 1 -  7:20 am - 10:05 am     Monday - Friday
Shift 2 - 11:10 am - 1:50 pm    Monday - Friday

State Consolidated Standards
 

  1. Academic Foundations
  2. Communications
  3. Problem-Solving and Critical Thinking
  4. Information Technology Applications
  5. Systems
  6. Safety, Health and Environmental
  7. Leadership and Teamwork
  8. Ethics and Legal Responsibilities
  9. Employability and Career Development
  10. Technical Skills
  11. Printing Pathway

State Segments
 

  1. Industry Overview
  2. Safety and Health
  3. Intro to Design and Image Development
  4. Introduction to Image Output
  5. Introduction to Finishing Operations
  6. Employability Skills and Portfolio
  7. Applied Academics
  8. New Media, Advanced Design and Image Level
  9. Leadership
  10. Advance Image Output
  11. Advanced Finishing Operations
  12. Project Management

Course Description

This course exposes students to all aspects of the graphics industry with emphases on Media Production, which provides students with “hands on” experience in photography, documentary, drama, and artistic applications.  History and technical aspects will be explored while each student develops their own portfolio. Experience in Photoshop, photography or other visual arts is helpful, but not required.

Leadership and Competitions

Students are encouraged to participate in various leadership activities: classroom tours I-Save committee and I-Save design contests, The North American International Auto Show Poster Contest, Scholastic Art Awards and photo work for clients.

Course Materials/Resources

Students will use Macintosh Computers with the following software:  Adobe CC Photoshop and Microsoft Office: Word and PowerPoint. Students will use the internet to research design samples, client needs and software tutorials. Students will download fonts to upload on their computers.

Recommended Student Supplies

Flash Drive to back up student computer work.

Course Requirements / Work Based Learning

Students will be required to do an off campus Business/Industry Visitation (Work Based Learning).  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a graphics/media business.  Students will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the Instructor regarding the experience

Dress Code

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford Career-Tech Dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, Graphics/Media students are not allowed to wear open toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford Career-Tech Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED)
 

  1. No Cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the classroom. For emergencies, students and parents may use the classroom phone.
  2. All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when students are not working at their computer.
  3. Students are allowed to use their phones as a camera for project based activities only.

Academics  

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final Year Math Related Credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

Job Placement assistance is available.

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college.

Course Schedule (Sequence and assignments are subject to change)

 

MP 1

Color Theory: Grey Scale & Color Wheel
Safety: Safety/Lab Tour, Tools/Equipment, Safety Test
Industry Overview: History of Photography, Beginnings, First Photo, Camera Types
Intro to Design / Output: Informal Portraits, Scanning Negatives, Abstract Photo (Cyanotype), Output
Intro to Image Development: Black & White Film, Short and long depth of field (Digital), Quiz: Camera Lens, Fast and slow shutter speeds (Digital)
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 1

MP 2

Intro to Image Development: Film Exposure Quiz, Camera Accessories Quiz, Macro Photography, Composition - 4 Photos
Intro to Design: Landscape and Cityscape, Same Subject Product Shot, Cut Out Composition
Intro to Image: Tabletop Photography/Product Shots
Output: Cell Phone Photos
New Media: Lighting Quiz
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 2

MP 3    

Digital Output: Formal Portraits - 3 shots, Finishing the Print Quiz, Photograms (photo paper)
New Media: Film Developing Quiz
Advanced Design: Photo Restoration
Academic: Photo Journalism Series
Midterm: Practice/Terms/Exam, Final Exam
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 3

MP 4    

New Media: Thaumatrop, Fish Eye Lens (film)
Advance Design: Storyboards, Parent/Self (2 photos), Triptych
Project Management: Identify Shots
Advanced Finishing: Quiz on Shots
Advanced Output: Flip Book (Camera Lens Animation)
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 4

MP 5

Advanced Design Problem Solving:  Ghost Photo, A Bad Photo
Employability: Resume
New Media: Video Formats/History of TV, Film or Video Treatment, Show Me Technology
Advanced Output: Long Exposure, Cell Phone Photos
Advanced Design: Perspective Shot, Graffiti
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 5

MP 6

Advanced Design: Shooting Things in Pairs, Cell Phone Taken from Car, Abstract Photo
Project Management: Plate Fork and Shape, Individual Project
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 6
Academic: Final Exam

Absences / Tardies
 

  1. A student can NOT test out of this class.
  2. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence.
  3. If tardy, students may still earn points for work accomplished that day.  Students are expected to arrive as soon as possible, ready to learn.
  4. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale

100%         = A+
94 - 99%     = A
90 - 93%     = A-
87 - 89%    = B+
84 - 86%     = B
80 - 83%     = B-
77 - 79%    = C+
74 - 76%     = C
70 - 73%     = C-
67 - 69%     = D+
64 - 66%     = D
60 - 63%     = D-
0 – 59%    = E

Grading Outline

Projects / Assignments = 50%
Quizzes = 20%
Log Sheet = 10%
Film Review = 20%
Total Grading Scale = 100%

Grade Posting

Grades will be posted in Zangle and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability & Attendance

Days Absent
(per marking period)
  Employability Grade
(35% Maximum)
0 30 - 35% A
1 25 - 29% A-
2 15 - 24% B
3 5 - 14% C
4+  0 -  4% D or E

   

Work Habits

It is important for all students to develop a good work ethic.  Therefore, students will be evaluated on performance, work habits, jog readiness, job cleanup, proper use of time and classroom behavior.  These points will be reflected in the student’s points for the day within their log sheets.

Media Production students may not bring in other students from another classroom or school unless the instructor grants permission.

Cameras and equipment will be left out when we are working: therefore, no food or drink will be permitted in the classroom at any time.

Projects / Assignments

Projects must be completed to receive a grade. Projects done in the first semester cannot be turned in for any assignments in the second semester.  All photos must be mounted if being turned in for a grade unless being turned in at the end of the year for your portfolio.  Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional assignments or production (customer’s jobs).

Late and Make-up Work

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. For every day a project is late it will be lowered one letter grade per day.  After 7 days the student will receive a zero.

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test he/she is required to take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor.  This could possibly be before or after school.  Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Parents/Guardians

Please fill out the following forms given to your son/daughter and return the next school day:

  • Emergency Card
  • Safety Pledge / Student/Parent Consent/Release Form
  • Course Syllabus (this document)
  • I am pleased to speak with parents anytime.

 

Media Productions II Syllabus

Media Productions II

CIP: 10.0301 - Graphic & Printing Technology - Consolidated
PSN: 14207
Course: V1820 Media Production 2

 

Instructor: Tom Oddi
Phone: 734-419-2125
E-mail: oddite@wwcsd.net

Office Hours:
Shift 1 -  7:20 am - 10:05 am    Monday - Friday
Shift 2 - 11:10 am - 1:50 pm    Monday - Friday

Segment Q
 

  1. Client-Based Production:  Students will interpret client’s needs, give an estimate, develop a budget, order materials, produce a production plan, prepare artwork, provide a client proof, produce tangible items for the client, and initiate invoicing.
  2. Scholarships:  Students will be expected to research opportunities as well as evaluate, decide, and apply for scholarships.
  3. Competitions:  Students will evaluate rules and regulations, demonstrate understanding and interpret a project brief, critique work, and make recommendations for submissions.
  4. Advanced Hardware Technology:  Students will be introduced to trending hardware technology within our industries. Students will analyze product specifications, request quotes, estimate consumable supplies cost, and justify possible additional equipment.
  5. Advanced Software Technology:  Students will get exposure to the ever-changing array of software applications being used in the industry. Students will determine capability gaps in our current software, analyze software licensing costs, evaluate workflows that each given software could provide, and ultimately advanced project workflows within our current suite of programs. Students may also assess possible opportunities for certification in specific programs such as the Adobe Certified Expert Program.
  6. Advanced Methods and Materials:  Students will explore new substrates and production processes. Students will acquire samples of non-traditional materials for experimental applications. Students will hypothesize opportunities to employ new methods and materials as a vehicle to cut costs, increase revenue, obtain an additional experience or skill, and/or expand list of provided services to clients.
  7. Post-Secondary Opportunities / Employment Opportunities:  Students will compare opportunities for advancement in Post-Secondary Education versus the job outlook for non-post-secondary routes into the industry. Students will evaluate costs of higher education, and assess rates of income for graduates vs non-graduates within the industry.
  8. Entrepreneurship:  Students will investigate entrepreneurial opportunities within the industry.
  9. Independent Project Management: Students will be expected to develop individual work for self and/or client with an understanding of deadlines and maintain a schedule to produce the end product within those structured parameters.
  10. Self-Promotional Marketing: Students will explore, research, and develop ways to market themselves through written and visual work to be used for advancement in education and/or employment.
  11. Professional Portfolio Development: Students will develop individual pieces that will collectively produce a portfolio. Students will explore various ways to display their work in electronic form as well as in print.

Course Description

Advance students develop a professional portfolio, related to employment in Graphics Arts with emphases on Photography. Students market themselves through social media and other online venues, explore new software technology and advance techniques in Adobe Creative Suite. Students apply for scholarships, participate in graphics competitions and work-based learning experiences. Students manage production work within the classroom; working with clients / customers and produce professional work from beginning to end.  Students may choose to spend most of their time specializing in one department to advance their skill level for employment and/or post-secondary level.

Leadership and Competitions

Students are encouraged to participate in various leadership activities: SkillsUSA membership and SkillsUSA competitions, various design contest such as the North American International Auto Show Poster Contest, I-Save Poster, Shirt Designs, and Scholastic Art Awards.

Course Materials/Resources

Students will use Macintosh Computers with Adobe CC Photoshop and Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint. Students will use the internet to research design samples, techniques, client needs and software tutorials. Students will download fonts to upload on their computers.

Recommended Student Supplies  

Flash Drive to back up student computer work.

Course Requirements / Work Based Learning

Students will be required to do an off campus Business/Industry Visitation (Work Based Learning).  All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a graphics business.  Students will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the Instructor regarding the experience.

Dress Code

All students are expected to follow the William D. Ford Career-Tech Dress code. In addition to the school’s policies, Graphics students are not allowed to wear open toe shoes. Students are required to follow proper safety rules when operating equipment.

School Policies and Procedures

All students are expected to follow all policies and procedures in the William D. Ford Career-Tech Student Handbook.

Personal Electronic Devices (PED)
 

  1. No Cell phones (for communication of any kind) are to be used in the Graphics/Printing classroom. For Emergencies Students and Parents may use the classroom phone.
  2. All PEDs are to be shut off during lectures, demos and when students are not working at their computer.
  3. Students are allowed to use music devices at their computer with headphones in one ear only.  Only the student using the PED should be able to hear the music. Students need to hear and respond to the instructor. Students’ consequences will follow the student code of conduct.

Absences / Tardies
 

  1. Attendance problems will significantly disrupt student / employee learning and productivity.  This program strives for excellent attendance to emulate what is expected in the workplace.  
  2. Absences will effect the student’s employability grade and academic performance in this program.  
  3. After 16 absences for the entire school year, the student can NOT earn a Certificate of Completion.
  4. A student can NOT test out of this class for credit.
  5. 15+ minutes late to class is counted as an Absence for first period.  If tardy, students may still earn points for work accomplished that day.  Students are expected to call the instructor and arrive as soon as possible, ready to learn.
  6. Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  It is the student’s responsibility to find out information they have missed during an absence.

Grading Scale

100%         = A+
94 - 99%     = A
90 - 93%     = A-
87 - 89%    = B+
84 - 86%     = B
80 - 83%     = B-
77 - 79%    = C+
74 - 76%     = C
70 - 73%     = C-
67 - 69%     = D+
64 - 66%     = D
60 - 63%     = D-
0 - 59%    = E

Grading Outline

Employability & Attendance = 35%
Projects, Worksheets, & Vocabulary = 45%
Tests & Quizzes = 20%
Total Grading Scale = 100%

Grade Posting

Grades will be posted in Zangle and are available for students and parents to view online.

Employability

Students record their activities in a daily log. Students may earn 20 points each day. Points will be deducted for inappropriate behavior/attitude in a work related area. Examples of being inappropriate include: tardiness, not on task, unable to work well with others, abusing equipment and/or school property. Students will receive zero points for each day they are absent (5 points for calling the instructor). Students may earn extra points by doing extra work and additional clean up.

Days Absent
(per 6wk marking period)
  Employability Grade
(35% Maximum)
0 30 - 35% A
1 25 - 29% A-
2 15 - 24% B
3 5 - 14% C
4+ 0 -   4% D or E

       

Employability Grade will reflect accumulative absences for the semester.

Projects, Work Sheets and Vocabulary

Each project (assignment sheet) has the grading scale and rubric on how it will be evaluated. Students are allowed to redo their projects within the deadline to improve their grade. Students may earn extra credit points by completing additional production (customer’s jobs).

Late and Make-up Work

Students will be allowed to make up all possible work. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain missed assignments. It is possible that certain work such as group participation, labs and skills cannot be made up and, as a result, may impact a student’s grade. Late work will receive a deduction for each day late. After 5 days the student will receive no more than 50%.  After 7 days the student will receive a zero.

Tests and Quizzes

If a student is absent the day of a test (and has called the instructor or parent has called the instructor) the student is may take the test the following day. It is the student’s responsible to ask the instructor for the test when he/she returns. Failure to call the instructor will result in zero points for the test. Failure to take the test on the day returning will result in zero points for the test.

Course Schedule - (Sequence and assignments are subject to change)

 

MP 1

Client-Based Production / Advance Color Theory: Grey Scale & Color Wheel
Safety: Tools/Equipment, Safety Test
Portfolio: Informal Portraits
Portfolio: Scanning Negatives, Output
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 1

MP 2

Advanced Technology: Macro Photography, Landscape and Cityscape
Client-Based Production: Subject Product Shot, Cut Out Composition
Portfolio: Product Shots
New Media: Cell Phone Photos
Contests / Leadership: I-Save Poster Contest
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 2

MP 3

New Media: Digital Output / Formal, Portraits, Finishing the Print Quiz, Photograms (photo paper)
Advanced Client-Based Production: Photo Restoration
Academic: Photo Journalism Series
Mid-Term: Practice/Terms/Exam, Final Exam
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 3

MP 4

Advance Design / Project Management: Storyboards
Advance Design: Parent/Self (photos)
Project Management: Identify Shots in Sequence, Quiz on Shots
Advanced Output: Flip Book (Camera Lens Animation)
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 4

MP 5

Client-Based Production / Problem Solving: A Bad Photo
Employability: Resume, Interviewing Skills
Advanced Technology: Video Formats, Video Treatment, Long Exposure, Cell Phone Photos
Advanced Design / Portfolio: Perspective Shot, Graffiti
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 5

MP6

Portfolio: Cell Phone, Abstract Photo, Product Photo, Individual Project(s)
Contests / Leadership: I-Save Shirt Contest
Employability: Daily Log Sheet
Academic: Film Review - Write 6
Academic: Final Exam

Academics  

Successful completion of a one-year program will earn 3 elective credits. All Career-Tech programs meet the following requirements for graduation for Wayne-Westland students:

  • Final Year Math Related Credit
  • VPAA (Visual, Performing, or Applied Arts) Credit
  • World Language Credit
  • Science Credit

Upon Completion

Each student will receive a Competency Printout, ranking the technical skills completed in the program. Students may earn the following certificates:

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • Certificate of Completion (based on skill performance and less than 16 absences for the school year)
  • Certificate of Outstanding Achievement

Job Placement assistance is available.

Students may be eligible to receive free college credit with successful completion. The qualifications and number of college credit hours varies by the college.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor.  This could possibly be before or after school.  Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances.  Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Parents/Guardians

Please fill out the following forms given to your son/daughter and return the next school day:

  1. Emergency Card
  2. Safety Pledge / Student/Parent Consent/Release Form
  3. Course Syllabus (this document)

I am pleased to speak with parents anytime. Students have my business card.  Additional business cards and an additional copy of this syllabus are available upon request.

 

Medical Assisting II Syllabus

Medical Assisting II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

I.  IDENTIFYING INFORMATION

CIP Number: 51.0000 Therapeutic Services
Course Number: YR1 V2720
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times: Monday – Friday: 7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Office Hours: Monday – Friday    7:15 am – 2:30 pm or by appointment

Prerequisites: 

  • Certificate of Completion Medical Assisting I
  • Instructor Approval
  • Negative TB Skin Test
  • Proof of Hepatitis B vaccine
  • Physical Exam
  • Background Check

Instructor: Mrs. Mary Lou Krause, RN, BSN

Phone Number: (734) 419-2137
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127
Email: krausem@wwcsd.net

Instructor Background:

Mary Lou Krause received her Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing from Michigan State University and an Interim Occupational Certification from Ferris State University.  She has been a registered nurse since 1992.  Her background in nursing includes women’s health (obstetrics/gynecology, infertility/reproductive endocrinology, postpartum/newborn care), medical/surgical, cardiac, orthopedic, home health care, as well as a prenatal and fitness instructor.  She has been a Health Occupations and Medical Assisting Instructor at the William D. Ford Career Technical Center since 2010.  She is an American Heart Association Instructor and teaches First Aid and CPR for Health Care Providers through Wayne County Community College.  She is Train-the-Trainer certified to teach the certified nurse aid programs since 2011.

II.  TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS


Textbooks
 

Title: Today’s Medical Assistant
Author: Kathy Bonewit-West, Sue Hunt, & Edith Applegate
Edition: Third Edition (2016)
Publisher: Elsevier
Required: Yes

Title: Study Guide for Today’s Medical Assistant
Author: Kathy Bonewit-West, Sue Hunt, & Edith Applegate
ISBN: 9780323311281(2016)
Publisher: Elsevier
Required: Yes

Title: Body Structures & Function
Author: Ann Scott & Elizabeth Fong
Edition: Eleventh Edition (2008)
ISBN: 9781428304208
Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning
Required: Yes

Title: Intro to Medical Terminology
Author: Ann Erlich & Carol Schroeder
Edition: Second Edition (2008)
ISBN:  9781428304208
Publisher:  Thomson Delmar Learning
Required:  Yes

Online Blended Learning


Title: Health Center 21
Publisher:  Applied Educational Systems (AES)
Site: https://learn.aeseducation.com
Required: Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students will receive course modules developed by the instructor and will need a 3-inch binder with dividers to organize materials provided during this course.

Students must purchase an approved uniform and a stethoscope for clinical externships.

III.  COURSE DESCRIPTION

Medical Assisting II prepares students at an advance level of skills necessary for utilization in a clinical setting.  Anatomy, pathophysiology, medical terminology, medical math, clinical externships, and leadership are emphasized during Medical Assisting II.   Certification in BLS – CPR and First Aid can be obtained during this course.  Professionalism is an important aspect to this program and must be adhered to in the clinical area.  Students will complete a clinical experience at a doctor’s office of their choice.  Students are required to attend class at least once a week or they will not receive credit for their clinical.

Permission by Instructor must be obtained to enter into this program by obtaining a certificate of completion.

Certificate of Program Completion

Certificate of Completion will be issued to students with:

  • “B-” average or above
  • 70% of skills at a level 2
  • 12 or less absences for the school year.
  • attend 100% of the clinical externship.
  • Professional behavior (refrain from suspensions, positive attitude)

Students can qualify for a Certificate of Completion or a Certificate of Excellence.  

The ability to perform clinical skills taught in class in mandatory.  Please keep these guidelines in mind if you are contemplating not completing a particular section (i.e. blood studies, blood drawing, urine studies, hemoccults, etc.) or not attending a clinical experience.  Refusal to perform a skill or cheating will terminate the possibility of remaining in the program.  Students work independently and must be able to perform the skills necessary to work in a clinical setting.

Certificates

Upon meeting the criteria, students may earn several certificates for the Medical Assisting Program:

  • Certificate of Completion
  • Certificate of Excellence
  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • BLS – CPR
  • First Aid

College Information:

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan such as Ferris State University and Davenport University.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available varies by program and the college with which it is affiliated.

IV.  COURSE STANDARDS: The student will:

 

  • Demonstrate proper CPR and First Aid skills
  • Solve basic medical math problems including conversion problems
  • Perform proper EKG procedures.
  • Perform proper Phlebotomy techniques.
  • Employ self-assessment, goal setting and action planning skills
  • Perform proper injection technique including, intramuscular, intradermal, and subcutaneous
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of OSHA and HIPAA standards
  • Apply safety standards in classroom and at clinicals
  • Possess knowledge of medical terminology
  • Demonstrate sterile technique and follow sterile guidelines
  • Develop college and workplace readiness skills
  • Exhibit personal integrity
  • Understand the interdependence of the healthcare professions
  • Apply concepts of effective communication
  • Apply creative problem solving skills
  • Identify ethical and legal issues in the health care system
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of anatomy and physiology
  • Demonstrate accurate vision screenings including the use of a Snellen chart and Optec Machine
  • Demonstrate proper hearing screenings using an audiometer
  • Develop a team approach to health care
  • Obtain clinical experience outside the classroom
  • Utilize Infection Control procedures in a clinical setting
  • Develop effective leadership qualities and skills
  • Participate in community service activities

V.  COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

  • Regular Internet access
  • Background Check- Form to be filled out and returned to school so this can be done.  A copy of the background check will go to the student’s clinical site.
  • HOSA:  Students will be members of HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America) which is a student led organization and is embedded in the course curriculum.  Students have the opportunity to compete with other HOSA members at Regionals in Grosse Ile in January.  Gold medal winners may advance to State competition at Traverse City in April as long as they maintain a C average in the class and have less than 8 absences at the time of registration.  They must have good attendance with the career center as well as at their home school. Finally, only students with professional behavior (i.e. no suspensions, etc.) will be allowed to go to states.  It is at the discretion of the advisor for students to compete at the state and national levels. Visit HOSA.org and MichiganHOSA.org for more information.  More information on this and fundraising at our kickoff in September.  Membership and competition costs $40/year plus students must assist with fundraising to defray costs of competition.  Students not participating in the competitive event will be given a term paper assignment to work on in class while others prepare for their competitive event. This paper will be due on competition day.
  • Community Service Activities: 10 hours required and documented on letterhead
  • Required Uniform and Cost: Students will be required to wear any color scrubs of their choice.  However, we are working with a local uniform company that will fit students for the uniforms.  Cost for the uniforms is approximately $26.  Students will also be required to have a picture ID badge that is required to wear at clinical sites.  The cost $2.
  • Work-Based Learning: Students are required to find a medical assistant clinical position for second semester by December 1.  Clinical rotation is mandatory. Work-based learning is a valuable experience.  Students will need to provide their own transportation to and from the site. Students will turn in a question and answer assignment each week and do a class presentation at the end of the year.

VI.  CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

 

Grading Policy

Exams = 30%
Skills = 30%
Employability/Attendance = 15%
Quizes = 15%
Writing Assignments/Modules = 10%

 A+         100
 A            94
 A-          90
 B+         87
 B           84
 B-          80
 C+         77
 C            74
 C-          70
 D+         67
 D            64
 D-          60
 E            Below 60

Failure

The above grading scale will be used for report card purposes.  Parents/Guardians will be informed regularly of their child’s progress via email, progress notes, conferences, and phone contact if necessary.  Student grades are entered into MiStar (Zangle).  Parents/Guardians of students outside Wayne/Westland School District are encouraged to gain access to their child’s grades by registering in person at the main office. Parent/Guardian must bring picture identification when registering for MiStar (Zangle) access.

Semester Grades:

30% each card-marking
10% Final Exam

Extra Credit:
 

  • Extra credit may be made available at the discretion of the instructor
  • Extra credit will be limited to students who have made a consistent and concerted effort to fulfill all program requirements.

Employability Grade

Weekly Employability skills grades will be included in your overall grade (15% of the grade).  Students must actively participate in class, be willing to offer extra help in some way: such as, putting away equipment, straightening the classroom, helping another student, etc. to receive full points.  You may get extra points by completing extra duties or have points subtracted for not following directions such as excessive talking, off task, rudeness to classmates or teacher, being out of designated area, not wearing uniform on required day, sleeping during class, grooming during class, etc.  No points are awarded on days absent unless it is school related.  Daily attendance is required!

Students are responsible for maintaining a clean classroom environment.  Food and beverages will be allowed in the classroom as long as it does not interfere with instruction and will be cleaned up by the student afterwards.  It will not be permitted while using computers or while in the lab or working with equipment.  Students are also responsible for demonstrating respect for school property. It is essential that all students work as a team and have a positive attitude.  Employability grade will reflect this.

Students are expected to come prepared to school daily.  They should have a pen or pencil, paper and other items as requested for the day.  On lab days, students are required to wear their uniform.

Lab/Clinical Skills

A ‘Competency Grade’ will be given for each skill taught.  Practice the skills for long-term retention.  You will be tested only once on the skill, so come prepared for testing off with the   instructors.

Levels are as follows:

4- student is competent enough to teach/demonstrate to others the task (95%)
3- student can perform the task without assistance (85%)
2- student can perform the task with minimal assistance (75%)
1- student practiced but did not test off on the task taught (40%)

VII.  COURSE SCHEDULE (Segment Q Standards)

 

MP 1
 

  • Review of Skills
  • Safety
  • HIPAA
  • Abbreviations
  • Cardiac System
  • Electrocardiogram

MP 2
 

  • Abbreviations
  • Transcription
  • CPR
  • First Aid
  • Phlebotomy

MP 3
 

  • Abbreviations
  • Medications
  • Reproductive Unit
  • Special Senses
  • Auditory and Vision Testing
  • Digestive System

MP 4
 

  • Externship
  • Physical Therapy
  • Sterilization
  • Wound Care
  • Staple and Suture Removal

MP 5
 

  • Externship
  • Insurance, Billing and Coding
  • Pegboard and Financial Unit

MP 6
 

  • Externship
  • Nervous System
  • Resume, Cover Letter, Portfolio

VIII.  COURSE POLICIES AND EXPECTATIONS

**The instructor reserves the right to change these procedures/schedule at any time without written notification.  If changed, verbal notification at the least will be given.

Building Initiatives
 

  • Career Ready 101:  Students are expected to take a pre-test in Math and Reading at the beginning of the school year and work to move up to the 4 th level.  If pretested at the 4th level or above students must move up a level or at least put in 4 hours.
  • Pre-Tests:  Students are expected to take the course pretest as well as two math tests, Basic Skills and Health Content.  Post tests will be given towards the end of the school year.
  • Nonfiction Writing:  Students will be expected to turn in a nonfiction writing assignment each card marking

Late Work/Missing Assignments (work turned in or missing assignment after determined/ assigned due date)
 

  • Test/Quizzes must be taken day they are assigned
  • Late assignments are not excepted unless you use the late pass that is given out once each card marking.  It is good for one day late only.  It is used for when you have forgotten your assignment at home, not to delay in doing the assignment or to copy the answers while going over assignment in class.
  • Assignments and tests that do not have names on it do not get credit.
  • It is possible that certain kinds of school work such as skills day cannot be made up and, as a result, may negatively impact a student’s grade.
  • Missed Assignments with Parent/Guardian Excused Absence and Student contacted teacher:
    • Work assigned prior to an absence (including long-term/major projects/papers)- Work is due upon return from absence.
    • Work assigned on date of an absence – One-day grace period for each day missed.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to get the assignments missed.
  • Missed Tests with Parent/Guardian Excused Absence and Student contacted teacher:
    • Test missed on date of absence- If student has prior knowledge of test date student is expected to take test day of return.
    • Test scheduled during absence- If student did not have materials for test due to absence student is given one-day grace period to take test.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to arrange for the make-up test.

Extra Help: Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Cheating: If a student is found to be cheating on a quiz, test, final exam, or copying someone else’s homework assignment, a zero will be entered in the grade book for the score and a parent will be contacted.

Break: Each class is scheduled a 15 min break. Students are expected back in their classroom on time.  Please note: Breaks are optional; teacher may decide to waive break time if she deems it necessary.

Personal Electronic Devices (cell phones, computer games, walkmans, iPods, and MP3 players) are not to be seen or used in the classroom unless granted permission of instructor for instructional purposes.

Sleeping is not permitted at any time during this class.  This also includes putting one’s head on their desk to eliminate any debate on the subject.   It will affect employability grade and disciplinary action will be taken.

Attendance: The Wayne-Westland Community School District’s attendance policy will be enforced. You are to arrive on time to class.15 minutes late to class is marked as an absence for the class hour.  Absences should be called into Attendance Office by parent/guardian for it to be excused.  The student is responsible for calling or emailing me with an absence prior to start of class.   My number is: 734-419-2137. My email Krausem@wwcsd.net.

Please note:

  • At 5 absences, parents will be contacted by teacher.
  • At 10 absences, parents will be contacted by administration.
  • At 12 absences for the entire year, you no longer are eligible for the certificate of completion for Medical Assisting 1.

IX.  CLINICALS

You are expected to attend all clinical experiences scheduled for this class. Any time we are having a clinical experience in the room or at a clinical site, you are expected to come prepared:    

  • Hair up and off collar – no inappropriate hair color (blue, pink, etc.)
  • Short nails and no nail polish.  This is a safety & health hazard and will not be permitted. (Even if clinical site does not have this rule, the rule must be upheld.)
  • No jewelry - no bracelets (gold, plastic, or string), rings, necklaces, eyebrow, nose piercing, and tongue rings.  This is strictly enforced.  You may wear only 1 pair of stud earrings and a watch with your uniform.
  • No perfume, cologne or strong smelling hand lotion.
  • Must have white socks and white leather shoes (no canvas shoes).
  • Name tag must be worn at all times at clinical sites.  Failure to provide a name tag for a clinical site will result in failure to attend a clinical site.  This student will receive a 0 for the day.
  • Approved scrub uniform is required to practice skills, participate in labs, for Clinical Tours, and for Clinicals.  Scrub sets should be clean and unwrinkled (not just pulled out of a bag and put on over other clothing!).  Uniforms should not be worn to school when attending a clinical site.  It is your responsibility to purchase and wear appropriate foot wear and under garments.  If you are dressed unprofessional you will not only lose employability points, but you will also not be allowed to attend the clinical site.

Clinical is mandatory for this class.  Failure to attend clinical rotations can result in an E for the card marking for clinical and failure to receive a Certificate of Completion.  Also, you are in jeopardy of passing this class and receiving the 3 credits.  If the student is dropped from clinical due to attendance or behavioral problems, the student will fall into the category of failure to attend clinical rotations.

Clinical experience is an important aspect to this Medical Assisting II class and participation is required.  It is the responsibility of the student to secure a private clinical position and to have reliable transportation to and from the site. Failure to obtain a private clinical site can result in termination of class at end of the first semester.

It is the responsibility of the student to obtain a TB test and physical for clinical.  Students will not be allowed on clinical sites without this documentation.

It is your responsibility to arrive to class in proper dress attire for clinical.  It is your responsibility to have proper ID for clinical at all times.  Failure to do so will result in failure to attend clinical.  

Time sheets are due on your class day.  No exceptions!  If you miss your scheduled class day results in a zero for the week.

Attendance is extremely important and will be strictly enforced.  More than 2 absences from your private clinical, 1 absence from Garden City Hospital and 1 absence from Special Tree Rehab will terminate you from clinical and will result in a failing grade for the card marking.  Absences with documentation from a doctor’s office/hospital on appropriate letterhead and special situations will be taken into consideration at the discretion of the instructor.  When unable to attend clinical, it is the responsibility of the student to contact their private clinical site to inform them of the absence before the scheduled clinical time and to contact the Ms. Bartek or Mrs. Krause.

If you miss a clinical day (snow day/sickness/emergency) you must call your clinic site and call or text Mrs. Krause before the start of your clinical.  You must text the name of who you spoke to and the nature of your absence. Also, you must call or text the new date and time of your make up day. This needs to be noted on your time sheet or on company letterhead by your clinical representative.  It must be in writing by them. Make up days that are done during breaks must be approved and in writing by your clinical representative. A No Call/No Show will result in being pulled from clinical.  No exceptions.   If you do not attend clinicals, you must come to class.

Attitude and behavior is an important part of clinical.  Second year students should be professional at all times while on clinical site. Your employability points on your clinical grade are deducted for any nonprofessional behaviors such as no time sheet, rudeness, not meeting deadlines, tardies, not calling/texting absences, long nails or nail polish, etc.

I am looking forward to a fun and productive school year.  Should you have any questions please call 734-419-2137 or email krausem@wwcsd.net.

 

Medical Assisting I & II

Medical Assisting I:

1 year – 3 credits

 

This program is an instructional program which focuses on the skills needed to be employed in an outpatient medical facility. Both administrative and clinical skills will be covered. Administrative skills include computer applications, telephone communications, patient accounting, insurance billing, appointment scheduling and medical office management. Clinical skills include ECG, phlebotomy, medication administration, injections, vital signs, sterile technique and laboratory procedures. Anatomy, medical terminology and certification in CPR/First Aid are also covered in depth.

Students will be required to purchase a uniform for this program.

Medical Assisting II:

1 year – 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Medical Assisting I and instructor’s recommendation.

Students will continue to improve competencies in specialized areas and advance clinical skills. A requirement of this program is a mandatory, unpaid clinical experience in a medical office/clinic or hospital facility. Students will focus on medical transcription, phlebotomy, anatomy, medical terminology and medical office management.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Bookkeeping (pegboard system)
  • Insurance billing
  • Medical transcription and terminology
  • Medication administration
  • Injections
  • Venipuncture
  • Routine laboratory tests
  • Vital signs
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Assisting with in-office surgery
  • Finger puncture
  • First aid
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Telephone communications
  • Scheduling appointments
  • Professional ethics
  • Taking patient’s medical history
  • Specimen collection
  • Medical Office Administration
  • Anatomy

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Electrocardiography machine
  • Sphygmomanometer
  • Centrifuge
  • Autoclave
  • Computers/various software
  • Surgical instruments
  • Needles and syringes
  • Microscope
  • Spirometer
  • Doppler
  • Transcription
  • Pulse OX
  • Audiometer
  • Ear irrigation
  • Optec and Titmus vision testers
  • Clinitex 50

Occupational Options:
 

  • Medical Office Administrator
  • Medical Assistant
  • Insurance Biller
  • Phlebotomist
  • Unit Clerk
  • Medical Receptionist/Secretary
  • Medical Transcriber
  • ECG Technician
  • Lab Assistant
  • Pharmacy Clerk
  • Dental Receptionist
  • Dental Office Aide

Medical Assisting I Syllabus

Medical Assisting I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

I. IDENTIFYING INFORMATION

Course Name: Medical Assisting I
CIP Number: 51.0000 Therapeutic Services
Course Number: V2710
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times: Monday – Friday
7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Office Hours: Monday – Friday
7:15 am – 2:30 pm or by appointment

Prerequisites:
Negative TB Skin Test - 2-year program
Physical Exam - 2-year program
Background Check - 2-year program

Instructor: Mrs. Mary Lou Krause, RN, BSN
Phone Number: (734) 419-2137
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127
Email: krausem@wwcsd.net

Instructor Background:

Mary Lou Krause received her Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing from Michigan State University and an Interim Occupational Certification from Ferris State University.  She has been a registered nurse since 1992.  Her background in nursing includes women’s health (obstetrics/gynecology, infertility/reproductive endocrinology, postpartum/newborn care), medical/surgical, cardiac, orthopedic, home health care, as well as a prenatal and fitness instructor.  She has been a Health Occupations and Medical Assisting Instructor at the William D. Ford Career Technical Center since 2010.  She is an American Heart Association Instructor and teaches First Aid and CPR for Health Care Providers through Wayne County Community College.  She is Train-the-Trainer certified to teach the certified nurse aid programs since 2011.

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

 

Textbooks

 

Title: Today’s Medical Assistant
Author: Kathy Bonewit-West, Sue Hunt, & Edith Applegate
Edition: Third Edition (2016)
Publisher: Elsevier
Required:  Yes

Title: Study Guide for Today’s Medical Assistant
Author: Kathy Bonewit-West, Sue Hunt, & Edith Applegate
ISBN:  9780323311281(2016)
Publisher:  Elsevier
Required:  Yes

Online Blended Learning

 

Title:  Health Center 21
Publisher: Applied Educational Systems (AES)
Site: https://learn.aeseducation.com
Required: Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students will receive course modules developed by the instructor and will need a 3-inch binder with dividers to organize materials provided during this course.

Students must purchase an approved uniform for clinical experiences.

Second year students must purchase a stethoscope for clinical externships.

III. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Medical Assisting I prepares students for entry-level positions as a medical assistant in various health care settings; such as, doctor’s office, medical clinic, urgent care, hospital, chiropractor office, dental office, billing office, etc.  Emphasis is placed on both clinical and administrative skills necessary to perform the responsibilities of a medical assistant. Technical skills taught in the classroom are necessary for a clinical setting in order to provide quality patient care.  Anatomy of the body, pathophysiology, medical terminology, patient care, and medical math are emphasized throughout this course.  Certification in BLS - CPR and First Aid may be obtained during this course.  Professionalism must be maintained at all times during this class to develop skills necessary to work in health care facilities delivering quality patient care.  Throughout the duration of this course, students will be observing various professions within the medical field; such as, medical lab, phlebotomy, nursing assistants, radiology technicians, respiratory therapists, occupational therapist, physical therapists, vet technicians, nursing, and case managers.

Permission by Instructor must be obtained to enter into to Medical Assisting II program by obtaining a certificate of completion.

Certificate of Program Completion

Certificate of Completion will be issued to students with:

  • “C” average or above
  • 70% of skills at a level 2
  • 12 or less absences for the school year.
  • attend at least 90% of the clinical experience.
  • Professional behavior (refrain from suspensions, positive attitude)

The ability to perform clinical skills taught in class in mandatory.  Please keep these guidelines in mind if you are contemplating not completing a particular section (i.e. blood studies, blood drawing, urine studies, hemoccults, etc.) or not attending a clinical experience.  Refusal to perform a skill or cheating will terminate the possibility of returning as a second year student.

Certificates

Upon meeting the criteria, students may earn several certificates for the Medical Assisting Program:

  • Certificate of Completion
  • Perfect Attendance
  • Outstanding Attendance
  • BLS – CPR
  • First Aid
  • State Exam

College Information

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan such as Ferris State University and Davenport University.  The qualifications and number of college credit hours available varies by program and the college with which it is affiliated.

IV. COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:  The student will be able to:

 

  1. Acquire CPR with AED certification
  2. Acquire First Aid Certification
  3. Complete basic medical math problems including conversion problems
  4. Perform EKG’s
  5. Employ self-assessment, goal setting and action planning skills
  6. Perform injections
  7. Measure vital signs
  8. Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of OSHA and HIPAA standards
  9. Possess knowledge of safety standards
  10. Possess knowledge of medical terminology
  11. Demonstrate sterile technique and follow sterile guidelines
  12. Demonstrate proper body mechanics and Ergonomics
  13. Develop college and workplace readiness skills    
  14. Understand the interdependence of the healthcare professions
  15. Identify concepts of effective communication
  16. Identify and practice creative problem solving skills
  17. Identify ethical and legal issues in the health care system
  18. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology
  19. Perform hand-washing
  20. Measure height and weight
  21. Calculate body mass index
  22. Develop a team approach to health care
  23. Understand Information Technology and the impact on healthcare  
  24. Practice Infection Control procedures
  25. Develop effective leadership qualities and skills
  26. Participate in community service activities
  27. Promote a supportive learning environment

V.  COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
 

  • Clinical Student Disclosure Statement:  All students entering into a medical program must sign a document stating that no felony charges are in your history as a minor. This is a state mandate for all health career programs. Documentation will accompany this syllabus upon entering into the Medical Assisting Program.
  • HOSA: Students will be members of HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America) which is a student led organization and is embedded in the course curriculum.  Students have the opportunity to compete with other HOSA members at Regionals in Grosse Ile in January.  Gold medal winners may advance to State competition at Traverse City in April as long as they maintain a C average in the class and have less than 8 absences at the time of registration.  They must have good attendance with the career center as well as at their home school. Finally, only students with professional behavior (i.e. no suspensions, etc.) will be allowed to go to states.  It is at the discretion of the advisor for students to compete at the state and national levels. Visit HOSA.org and MichiganHOSA.org for more information.  More information on this and fundraising at our kickoff in September.  Membership and competition costs $40/year plus students must assist with fundraising to defray costs of competition.  Students not participating in the competitive event will be given a term paper assignment to work on in class while others prepare for their competitive event. This paper will be due on competition day.  
  • Community Service Activities: 10 hours required and documented on letterhead
  • Required Uniform and Cost: Students will be required to wear Navy Uniforms.  We are working with a local uniform company that will fit students for the uniforms.  Cost for the uniforms is approximately $26.  Students will also be required to have a picture ID badge that is required to wear at clinical sites.  The cost $2.
  • Work-Based Learning: Students will be required to find a health care professional to job shadow.  This is a heavily graded assignment.  Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, the evaluation form filled and signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will do a presentation in class and turn in a three-page paper regarding the experience.

VI. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

 

Grading Policy

Exams = 30%
Skills = 30%
Employability/Attendance = 15%
Quizes = 15%
Writing Assignments/Modules = 10%

A+    100
A    94
A-    90
B+    87
B    84
B-    80
C+    77
C    74
C-    70
D+    67
D    64
D-    60
E    Below 60

Failure

The above grading scale will be used for report card purposes.  Parents/Guardians will be informed regularly of their child’s progress via email, progress notes, conferences, and phone contact if necessary.  Student grades are entered into MiStar (Zangle).  Parents/Guardians of students outside Wayne/Westland School District are encouraged to gain access to their child’s grades by registering in person at the main office. Parent/Guardian must bring picture identification when registering for MiStar (Zangle) access.

Semester Grades:

30% each card-marking
10% Final Exam

Extra Credit:
 

  • Extra credit may be made available at the discretion of the instructor
  • Extra credit will be limited to students who have made a consistent and concerted effort to fulfill all program requirements.

Employability Grade

Weekly Employability skills grades will be included in your overall grade (15% of the grade).  Students must actively participate in class, be willing to offer extra help in some way: such as, putting away equipment, straightening the classroom, helping another student, etc. to receive full points.  You may get extra points by completing extra duties or have points subtracted for not following directions such as excessive talking, off task, rudeness to classmates or teacher, being out of designated area, not wearing uniform on required day, sleeping during class, grooming during class, etc.  No points are awarded on days absent unless it is school related.  Daily attendance is required!

Students are responsible for maintaining a clean classroom environment.  Food and beverages will be allowed in the classroom as long as it does not interfere with instruction and will be cleaned up by the student afterwards.  It will not be permitted while using computers or while in the lab or working with equipment.  Students are also responsible for demonstrating respect for school property. It is essential that all students work as a team and have a positive attitude.  Employability grade will reflect this.

Students are expected to come prepared to school daily.  They should have a pen or pencil, paper and other items as requested for the day.  On lab days, students are required to wear their uniform.

Lab/Clinical Skills

A ‘Competency Grade’ will be given for each skill taught.  Practice the skills for long-term retention. You will be tested only once on the skill, so come prepared for testing off with the   instructors.

Levels are as follows:

        4- student is competent enough to teach/demonstrate to others the task (95%)
        3- student can perform the task without assistance (85%)
        2- student can perform the task with minimal assistance (75%)
        1- student practiced but did not test off on the task taught (40%)

VII. COURSE SCHEDULE

 

MP 1 Segments

Health and Safety (7)

  • Introductory Activities
  • Emotional, physical and classroom safety
  • General Safety in Health Care
  • Infection Control
  • Blood Borne Pathogens
  • Ergonomics
  • Fire Safety
  • Disaster Preparedness and Disaster Communications
  • Hazmat
  • TB Precautions, MRSA, and VRE precautions
  • OSHA Requirements

Health care systems (3)

  • Health Care Insurance,
  • Current Technologies
  • Epidemiology
  • Emerging Diseases.

MP 2 Segments    

Legal and Ethics (5&6)

  • Understanding Legal Responsibilities
  • Medical Law
  • HIPPA Law
  • Understanding Ethical Issues within the Health Care System.
  • Cultural Diversity

Academic Foundations (1)    

  • Anatomy & Physiology of each body system
  • Medical Math
  • Charts and Graphs

MP 3 Segments    

Communications (2)

  • Abbreviations
  • Medical Terminology (Prefixes, suffixes and combining forms)
  • Understanding the communication process and diversity of patients.
  • Typing and Transcribing

Health Maintenance (9)

  • Health Maintenance Practices
  • BMI
  • Height and Weight
  • Exercise and Diet
  • Stress and Anger Management Techniques

MP 4 Segments

Technical Skills (10)

  • CPR/AED
  • First Aid
  • Vital Signs

Information Technology (11)    

  • Electronic charting
  • Robotic surgery
  • Diagnostic Machines

MP 5 Segments

Team Work (8)

  • Understanding that ability to work as a team member in healthcare

Work-based Learning (12)

  • Clinical tours for observation of Health Care Profession
  • Job Shadowing

MP 6 Segments

Employability (4)    

  • Professionalism
  • Attendance
  • Leadership
  • Resume, Cover Letter, Thank-you letter, Job Interview
  • A Game

VIII.  COURSE POLICIES AND EXPECTATIONS

**The instructor reserves the right to change these procedures/schedule at any time without written notification.  If changed, verbal notification at the least will be given.

Building Initiatives
 

  • Career Ready 101:  Students are expected to take a pre-test in Math and Reading at the beginning of the school year and work to move up to the 4th level.  If pretested at the 4th level or above students must move up a level or at least put in 4 hours.
  • Pre-Tests:  Students are expected to take the course pretest as well as two math tests, Basic Skills and Health Content.  Post tests will be given towards the end of the school year.
  • Nonfiction Writing:  Students will be expected to turn in a nonfiction writing assignment each card-marking

Late Work/Missing Assignments
 

  • Test/Quizzes must be taken day they are assigned
  • Late assignments are not excepted unless you use the late pass that is given out once each card-marking.  It is good for one day late only.  It is used for when you have forgotten your assignment at home, not to delay in doing the assignment or to copy the answers while going over assignment in class.
  • Assignments and tests that do not have names on it do not get credit.
  • It is possible that certain kinds of school work such as skills day cannot be made up and, as a result, may negatively impact a student’s grade.
  • Missed Assignments with Parent/Guardian Excused Absence and Student contacted teacher:
    • Work assigned prior to an absence (including long-term/major projects/papers)- Work is due upon return from absence.
    • Work assigned on date of an absence – One-day grace period for each day missed.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to get the assignments missed.
  • Missed Tests with Parent/Guardian Excused Absence and Student contacted teacher:
    • Test missed on date of absence- If student has prior knowledge of test date student is expected to take test day of return.
    • Test scheduled during absence- If student did not have materials for test due to absence student is given one-day grace period to take test.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to arrange for the make-up test.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Cheating:  If a student is found to be cheating on a quiz, test, final exam, or copying someone else’s homework assignment, a zero will be entered in the grade book for the score and a parent will be contacted.

Breaks:  Each class is scheduled a 15 min break. Students are expected back in their classroom on time.  Please note: Breaks are optional; teacher may decide to waive break time if she deems it necessary.

Personal Electronic Devices (cell phones, computer games, walkmans, iPods, and MP3 players) are not to be seen or used in the classroom unless granted permission of instructor for instructional purposes.

Sleeping is not permitted at any time during this class.  This also includes putting one’s head on their desk to eliminate any debate on the subject.   It will affect employability grade and disciplinary action will be taken.

Attendance: The Wayne-Westland Community School District’s attendance policy will be enforced. You are to arrive on time to class.15 minutes late to class is marked as an absence for the class hour.  Absences should be called into Attendance Office by parent/guardian for it to be excused.  The student is responsible for calling or emailing me with an absence prior to start of class.   My number is: 734-419-2137. My email Krausem@wwcsd.net.

Please note:

  • At 5 absences, parents will be contacted by teacher.
  • At 10 absences, parents will be contacted by administration.
  • At 12 absences for the entire year, you no longer are eligible for the certificate of _    completion for Medical Assisting 1.

IX.  CLINICALS

You are expected to attend all clinical experiences scheduled for this class. Any time we are having a clinical experience in the room or at a clinical site, you are expected to come to class prepared:    

  • Hair up and off collar – no inappropriate hair color (blue, pink, etc.)
  • Short nails and no nail polish.  This is a safety & health hazard and will not be permitted.
  • No jewelry - no bracelets (gold, plastic, or string), rings, necklaces, eyebrow, nose piercing, and tongue rings.  This is strictly enforced.  You may wear only 1 pair of stud earrings and a watch with your uniform.
  • No perfume, cologne or strong smelling hand lotion.
  • Must have white socks and white leather shoes (no canvas shoes).
  • Name tag must be worn at all times at clinical sites.  Failure to provide a name tag for a clinical site will result in failure to attend a clinical site.  This student will receive a 0 for the day.
  • Approved scrub uniform is required to practice skills, participate in labs, and for Clinical Tours.  Scrub sets should be clean and unwrinkled (not just pulled out of a bag and put on over other clothing!).  Uniforms should not be worn to school when attending a clinical site.  It is your responsibility to purchase and wear appropriate foot wear and under garments.  If you are dressed unprofessional you will not only lose employability points, but you will also not be allowed to attend the clinical site.

I am looking forward to a fun and productive school year.  Should you have any questions please call 734-419-2137 or email krausem@wwcsd.net.

 

Welding Technology I & II

Welding Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement. The program is designed to prepare students for entry-level welding occupations. Students learn basic and advanced techniques in oxyacetylene, gas metal, shielded metal, and tungsten arc welding processes. Fabrication, brazing, cutting of metal products and blueprint reading are also taught. Proper work place attitudes and behaviors are also practiced.

Welding Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Welding Technology I and instructor's recommendation

Second-year students are expected to take a leadership role among his/her peers while improving/completing performance objectives on all equipment and all of the welding processes. Second year students will learn all position welding, fabrication, and job welding. First and second year high school students will be involved in welding competitions with students from other schools. Competitions may lead to awards, prizes, certificates and/or employment.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • SMAW welding
  • OAW welding
  • GMAW welding
  • GTAW welding
  • Shop welding
  • Shop safety
  • Brazing and cutting
  • Blueprint reading
  • Fabrication
  • Work place skills
  • Team work
  • Welding Math and Science
  • Algebra II
  • Plasma cutting
  • Arc Gouging
  • Flux Core welding
  • Measurement

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • SMAW arc welders
  • GMAW welders
  • GTAW welders
  • Pipe beveler
  • Brazing equipment
  • Iron crafter
  • Grinders (bench and pedestal)
  • Band saws (horizontal and vertical)
  • Shears
  • Plasma cutting system
  • Mill drill press
  • Robot automation
  • Spot welder
  • Inverters
  • OAW cutting system
  • Sandblast
  • Abrasive cut off saw

Occupational Options:
 

  • Combination Welder
  • Production Welder
  • Gas Welder/Cutter
  • SMAW Arc Welder
  • Fabricator
  • Welder/Fitter
  • Layout/Welder
  • Mechanic/Welder
  • Welding Engineer
  • Teacher
  • Metallurgy
  • Welding Instructor
  • Welding Sales
  • Welding Supervisor
  • Welding Inspector
  • Pipe Welder
  • Iron Worker
  • Boilermaker

 

Welding Technology I Syllabus

Welding Technology I

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Instructor: Mr. Nicholas Regets
Office Phone: (734) 419-2127

School Class Hours

First Shift: 7:20 – 10:05 A.M.
Second Shift: 11:20 – 1:50 P.M.

CIP: 48.0508
PSN: 19063
Course: V2110, V2110EM Embedded Math

This class offers a unique opportunity for students to receive credit for math by enrolling in either a senior math or an algebra II math section. The math section is imbedded into the welding curriculum as a regular part of the welding class. Visual Performing and Applied Arts (VPAA) Credit is available as well. This class is taught in the hopes of mastering the technical, academic and social skills needed for entry level employment or continued education in the welding industry.

First Year Student Segments/Units of Study
 

  1. Occupational Orientation
  2. Safety and Health in Welding
  3. Shielded Metal Arc Welding
  4. Manual Oxyacetylene Fuel Gas Cutting
  5. Mechanized Oxyacetylene Fuel Gas Cutting
  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding
  7. Drawing and Welding Symbols
  8. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
  9. Flux Cored Arc Welding
  10. Plasma Arc Cutting
  11. Air Carbon Arc Cutting
  12. Welding Inspection and Testing

Course Description:

Welding I students will study and practice basic welding principles involving shielded metal arc welding, oxyacetylene welding and either tungsten inert gas or gas metal arc welding in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions. Occupational opportunities are covered as well as safety and health awareness. Employability skills needed for success in the welding industry will be taught and students will visit manufacturing environments to experience what takes place in the business world. Basic units of measurement will be covered and students will be introduced to blueprint reading. Students will enjoy field trips to Community colleges to explore options for advanced learning and will be involved in welding competitions against other schools and each other. This course will serve as an introduction to the welding field and additional course work will be necessary for students to become more proficient in preparation for entry level welding in industry.

Prerequisites:

There are no requirements to enter the Welding Technology I class other than a desire to learn and a commitment to give your best consistent effort each day. First year seniors or juniors are welcomed.

Established Course Outcomes:

The Welding I student will:

  • Learn safe set up and operation of Oxyacetylene equipment.
  • Satisfactorily perform Oxyacetylene welds in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions.
  • Satisfactorily perform Shielded Metal arc welds in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions.
  • Satisfactorily perform either Tungsten Inert Gas Welding or Metal Inert Gas Welding in the flat, horizontal, and vertical positions.
  • Understand basic safety and health procedures along with work attitudes that may be expected in an industrial work setting.
  • Learn basic joint designs, related welding terminology, and be introduced to blueprints.
  • Have an understanding of the welding industry in order to make career choices.
  • Practice proper units of measurement with the basic rule and tape.
  • Participate in field trips to manufacturing facilities and Colleges
  • Participate in a competition for welding at Washtenaw Community College
  • Learn and operate various basic shop equipment that may be encountered in the welding industry

Welding Credit Issued: 1 1/2 elective credit per semester unless student is enrolled in a specific Math/Welding or a VPAA section, then the welding credit would be 1 and the Math or VPAA credit would be 1/2.

Senior Math Credit Issued: 1/2 credit per semester

Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit: 1/2 credit per semester

Algebra II Credit Issued: 1/2 credit per semester

Textbook and Materials Used:
 

  • Welding Skills by B.J. Moniz and R.T. Miller
  • Basic Blueprint Reading Skills by C. Thomas Olivo, Albert V. Payne, Thomas P. Olivo
  • Various handouts and videos covering welding related topics.

Welding Equipment needed for participation in the Welding Program:
 

  1. Fire stop or fire retardant jacket/with or without leather sleeves (leather sleeves are better and preferred).
  2. Steel toed welding boots
  3. Vise grips for quenching hot metal, larger ones hold up better. Two pairs are preferred as they wear out throughout the year.
  4. Tape measure with metric/standard measurement units.
  5. Three pairs of welding gloves / they need to be replaced throughout the year.
  6. Safety Glasses / One pair are provided but they do get scratched and worn out. Look for the stamp Z-87 on the glasses if you purchase your own. These are required Occupational Safety and Health Administration approved glasses. No dark shades are permitted.
  7. OAW Welding and cutting goggles/shade #5

Total costs can vary depending on where the safety equipment and clothes are purchased. Students will receive an equipment list with this syllabus so parents can begin planning how to obtain needed equipment.

Any students unable to obtain the safety clothes or equipment should contact Mr. Regets so arrangements can be made for that student to receive help in obtaining the equipment to make sure that the student may participate in the welding class.

Evaluation and Grading of Tests, Quizzes, and Projects:

Various written assignments on every unit will be worth 20% of the card marking grade including any math work. Students will have a daily activity grade that makes up 40% of the card marking grade which is subjective to instructor assessments on behavior, attitude, safety, performance, clean up and punctuality. A hands-on welding final will be given that is worth 20% of the card marking grade. The remaining 20% of the grade will be from unit tests. So, daily grades including welding tasks, written work, written tests, and the welding final will total 100% of the final grade. Extra credit may be awarded if students are involved in one or more of the various extra activities that are made available to all students who wish to participate.

Grading Scale and Policy

A     = 93.3 - 100
A-    = 90 - 93.2
B+     = 86.6 - 89.9
B     = 83.3 - 86.5
B-     = 80 - 83.2
C+     = 76.6 - 79.9
C     = 73.3 - 76.5
C-     = 70 - 73.2
D+     = 66.6 - 69.9
D     = 63.3 - 66.5
D-     = 60 - 63.2
E     = 0 - 59.9

Attendance, attitude, social behavior, work ethic and available extra credit assignments will determine whether a borderline grade will be raised or lowered. Students are expected to carry themselves professionally while treating each other respectfully. Social, academic and technical skills are all taught in the class to further prepare students for advancement into college, or entry level work in the welding industry.

Work-Based Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Program Attendance Policy:

Students must attend class regularly in order to receive credit or be considered for employment and competitive opportunities. If a student needs to be absent due to illness or an emergency situation, including court, funerals etc., she (he) should contact the office and bring in documentation for all absences. The main office will determine whether an absence is unexcused, excused, documented or undocumented.  All make-up work is required to be done within the first week of an absence.  A student may lose credit for the class if they exceed 15 days of absence unless they make arrangements to make up all hours missed over the 15 days and complete course requirements per instructor expectations.  Make up time and assignments must be arranged with the instructor.  NO credit will be given unless this requirement is met.  Remember…We are training students in preparation for entry level employment.  All employers expect excellent attendance and great attitudes.  Please help support us in these important areas!

Students must receive permission from the instructor for all school related functions, co-op working arrangements, field trips, competitions and any class sponsored experiences.

Certificates that may be awarded:
 

  1. Certificate of Completion to students who complete one full year in the program with at least 70% of welding competencies at a level of 2 or higher on a 4-point scale.
  2. Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement to students completing one full year in the welding program with at least 80% of welding competencies at a level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Thank you very much for any support you provide for your son or daughter! I will do my best to help you in preparing your son/daughter for a successful school year and life.

Mr. Regets may be contacted by e-mail at regetsn@wwcsd.net or phone at (734) 419-2127.

Please sign below and return the bottom portion of this page to Mr. Regets. Students are responsible for this for their first graded assignment.

I have read and understand the requirements for my son/daughter to participate in the Welding Technology Program at William D. Ford Career-Technical Center.

 

Parent Signature   ____________________________________

 

Welding Technology II Syllabus

Welding Technology II

COURSE SYLLABUS 2016-17

Instructor: Mr. Nicholas Regets
Office Phone: (734) 419-2127

School Class Hours:
First Shift: 7:20 – 10:05 A.M.
Second Shift: 11:20 – 1:50 P.M.

CIP: 48.0508
PSN: 19063
Course: V2120

This class offers a unique opportunity for students to receive credit for math by enrolling in either a senior math or an algebra II math section. The math section is imbedded into the welding curriculum as a regular part of the welding class. Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit is available as well. This class is taught in the hopes of mastering the technical, academic and social skills needed for entry level employment or continued education in the welding industry.

Second Year Student Segment Q Standards
 

  • Students will create, design and develop an art project including the construction of blueprints, complete planning and preparation all materials needed for fabrication of the Project.
  • Students will use their knowledge of welding flaws/defects to analyze, critique and identify welding discontinuities in their welds by using the welding Die Penetrant test.
  • Students will practice, use and discover the various techniques that are used in the welding industry while operating the Flux Cored Welding Application
  • Students will operate, practice, and build skills as they explore the use of the Plasma Cutting Application using Non Ferrous and Ferrous Metals
  • Students will learn, operate, practice and produce quality cuts on Ferrous metal with the industry used Copper Clad electrode/ Arc Gouging Application.
  • Students will practice, operate, and produce quality welds on non-ferrous/ferrous metals while exploring the multitude of advanced welding positions and techniques used with the Gas Tungsten Welding Application
  • Students will practice, operate, and produce quality welds on ferrous metals while exploring and critiquing those welds on the Shielded Metal Arc Welding Application
  • Students will practice, operate and produce quality welds on ferrous metal while interpreting various techniques, comparing and critiquing those welds by industry standards on the Gas Metal Arc Welding Application
  • Students will create, design, develop and formulate a written report, blueprints, safety guidelines, procedure application, welding fabrication, materials list, and photographs into a comprehensive collection of all of the components of a manufactured product that they would be expected to be able to do in industry.
  • Students will create advanced welds in the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process that they will critique and evaluate using the Certification testing method of face and root bending.
  • Students will evaluate consumer products in need of repair, develop plans, devise repair options, use their advanced welding skills and welding knowledge to demonstrate expertise on the various welding processes.

Course Description:

Welding II students will build on the fundamental skills learned in Welding I by continuing their welding training on all welding processes in the horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Advanced applications include certification testing, plasma cutting nonferrous metal, arc gouge cutting, art fabrication, welding project fabrication, welding inspection, flux core welding and customer project repair. Second year students will take on more responsibility as leaders through teamwork, mentoring, foreman positions, fabrication projects and welding repair work. Second year students will have increased opportunities to be involved in competitions that may lead to employment, scholarships, awards and prizes. The overall focus for the second year student is to prepare for entry level employment in the welding industry and/or advanced studies in a postsecondary college program. Second year students also participate in leading activities in open house, high school welding tryouts, middle school tours etc. A highly motivated student will be in great position for his/her next career step when leaving this class.

Prerequisites:

Successful completion of Welding Technology I and a desire to continue to learn and be committed to give a consistent effort each day.

Established Course Outcomes:

The Welding II student will:

  • Learn how to operate and cut non-ferrous metal in various shapes successfully with a Plasma torch.
  • Satisfactorily perform cutting operations with a Carbon arc graphite electrode.
  • Satisfactorily perform Shielded Metal arc welds in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions including practicing certification welding.
  • Satisfactorily perform Tungsten Inert Gas Welding in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions on nonferrous and ferrous metals.
  • Satisfactorily perform Gas Metal Arc Metal welding in the horizontal, vertical and overhead positions with ferrous metals of various thicknesses.
  • Develop a welding fabrication project including the fabrication, and welding of the project. A written report that includes detailed drawings, pictures, procedures, safety steps, introduction and conclusion will also be required.
  • Develop an Art project including the designing, drawing, fabricating and welding of the project.
  • Have an advanced understanding of the welding industry in order to make career choices, this includes a cover letter and resume to use as they enter the industry.
  • Participate in work based/field trips to manufacturing facilities and Colleges.
  • Participate in competitions for welding at various colleges, training centers and business locations.
  • Learn and operate various basic shop equipment that may be encountered in the welding industry
  • Satisfactorily perform Flux Cored welds in the Flat and horizontal positions.
  • Learn to identify welding defects by incorporating inspection techniques used on weldments including using dye penetrant testing and bend testing.
  • Participate in class activities that will allow them to learn leadership behaviors.

Welding Credit Issued: 1 1/2 elective welding credit per semester unless student is enrolled in a specific Math/Welding or a VPAA section, then the welding credit would be 1 and the Math or visual arts credit would be1/2.

Senior Math Credit Issued: 1/2 credit per semester

Visual Performing and Applied Arts Credit: 1/2 credit per semester

Textbook and Materials Used
 

  • Welding Skills by B.J. Moniz and R.T. Miller
  • Basic Blueprint Reading Skills by C. Thomas Olivo, Albert V. Payne, Thomas P. Olivo
  • Various handouts and videos covering welding related topics

Welding Equipment needed for participation in the Welding Program:
 

  1. Fire stop or fire retardant jacket/with or without leather sleeves (leather sleeves are better and preferred).
  2. Steel toed welding boots
  3. Vise grips for quenching hot metal, larger ones hold up better. Two pairs are preferred as they wear out throughout the year.
  4. Tape measure with metric/standard measurement units.
  5. Three pairs of welding gloves / they need to be replaced throughout the year.
  6. Safety Glasses / One pair are provided but they do get scratched and worn out. Look for the stamp Z-87 on the glasses if you purchase your own. These are required Occupational Safety and Health Administration approved glasses. No dark shades are permitted.
  7. OAW Welding and cutting goggles/shade #5

Total costs can vary depending on where the safety equipment and clothes are purchased. Students will receive an equipment list with this syllabus so parents can begin planning how to obtain needed equipment.

Any students unable to obtain the safety clothes or equipment should contact Mr. Regets so arrangements can be made for that student to receive help in obtaining the equipment to make sure that the student may participate in the welding class.

Evaluation and Grading of Tests, Quizzes, and Projects:

Various written assignments on every unit will be worth 20% of the card marking grade including any math work. Students will have a daily activity grade that makes up 40% of the card marking grade which is subjective to instructor assessments on behavior, attitude, safety, performance, cleanup and punctuality. A hands-on welding final will be given that is worth 20% of the card marking grade. The remaining 20% of the grade will be from Unit tests. So, daily grades including welding tasks, written work, written tests, and the welding final will total 100% of the final grade. Extra credit may be awarded if students are involved in one or more of the various extra activities that are made available to all students who wish to participate.

Grading Scale and Policy

A    = 93.3 - 100
A-     = 90 - 93.2
B+     = 86.6 - 89.9
B     = 83.3 - 86.5
B-     = 80 - 83.2
C+     = 76.6 - 79.9
C     = 73.3 - 76.5
C-     = 70 - 73.2
D+     = 66.6 - 69.9
D     = 63.3 - 66.5
D-     = 60 - 63.2
E     = 0 - 59.9

Attendance, attitude, social behavior, work ethic and available extra credit assignments will determine whether a borderline grade will be raised or lowered. Students are expected to carry themselves professionally while treating each other respectfully. Social, academic and technical skills are all taught in the class to further prepare students for advancement into college, or entry level work in the welding industry.

Work-Based Learning (Course Requirement):

Work-Based Learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

Extra Help:

Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Program Attendance Policy:

Students must attend class regularly in order to receive credit or be considered for employment and competitive opportunities. If a student needs to be absent due to illness or an emergency situation, including court, funerals etc., she (he) should contact the office and bring in documentation for all absences. The main office will determine whether an absence is unexcused, excused, documented or undocumented.  All make-up work is required to be done within the first week of an absence. A student may lose credit for the class if they exceed 15 days of absence unless they make arrangements to make up all hours missed over the 15 days and complete course requirements per instructor expectations.  Make up time and assignments must be arranged with the instructor.  NO credit will be given unless this requirement is met.  Remember…We are training students in preparation for entry level employment.  All employers expect excellent attendance and great attitudes.  Please help support us in these important areas!

Students must receive permission from the instructor for all school related functions, co-op working arrangements, field trips, competitions and any class sponsored experiences.

Certificates that may be awarded
 

  1. Certificate of Completion to students who complete one full year in the program with at least 70% of welding competencies at a level of 2 or higher on a 4-point scale.
  2. Certificate of Completion with Outstanding Achievement to students completing one full year in the welding program with at least 80% of welding competencies at a level 3 or higher on a 4-point scale.

Thank you very much for any support you provide for your son or daughter! I will do my best to help you in preparing your son/daughter for a successful school year and life.

Mr. Regets may be contacted by e-mail at regetsn@wwcsd.net or phone at (734) 419-2127.

Please sign below and return the bottom portion of this page to Mr. Regets. Students are responsible for this for their first graded assignment.

I have read and understand the requirements for my son/daughter to participate in the Welding Technology Program at William D. Ford Technical Career Center.

 

Parent Signature   ____________________________________

 

Locations

All courses except CADD & Early Childhood/Teacher Education are offered at:

William D. Ford Career-Technical Center
36455 Marquette
Westland, Michigan 48185
Phone: 734-419-2100
Fax: 734-595-2127

Location for CADD

Wayne Memorial High School
3001 Fourth Street
Wayne, Michigan 48184
Phone: 734-419-2200
Fax: 734-595-2227

Location for Early Childhood/Teacher Education

Wayne-Westland Community Schools Educational Complex
36745 Marquette
Westland, MI 48185
Phone: 734-419-2000
Fax: 734-595-2123