Alternative Energy Technology

Alternative Energy Technology:

1 year - 3 credits
 

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement. This program will introduce and develop the basic skills necessary to succeed in the new “green” and high-tech world of alternative energy. Students will explore the basic concepts of solar power and its applications, with an emphasis on photovoltaic systems.  The students will also analyze the modern application and utilization of wind power, concentrating on the usage of varying sizes of wind turbines for use in urban, rural and industrial areas. The theory is reinforced by practical application lab projects, culminating in working with solar panels and wind turbines.  This course will also explore biomass production, which will include alternative fuels used in electricity generation.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Identification of major components used in digital circuits
  • Basic AC/DC circuit analysis
  • PC board layout and wire
  • Troubleshooting/problem-solving techniques
  • Basic house wiring
  • Intro to photovoltaic installation
  • Basic understanding of biofuels and biomass
  • Wind turbine repair
  • Maintenance Technician

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Computer Assisted AC and DC Experiments
  • Computer Assisted Digital Experiments
  • Digital Trainer
  • Dual Trace Scopes/Vom Multimeters
  • Function Generators
  • Wind Turbine Trainer
  • Solar Panel Trainer

Occupational Options:
 

  • Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
  • Customer Engineering Specialist
  • Electronics Tester/Assembler
  • Electro/Mechanical Technician
  • Prototype Technician
  • Solar Panel Installer
  • Solar Panel Repair and Maintenance Technician
  • Wind Turbine Repair and Maintenance Technician
  • Wind Turbine Installer

 

Architecture and Engineering Design I & II

Architecture and Engineering Design I:

PDF DocumentArchitecture and Engineering Design I Course Syllabus

1 year – 2 or 3 credits

Prerequisite: Recommended but not required - Basic Drafting

This program is a high tech approach to drafting and design that prepares individuals to interpret, plan and modify architectural, mechanical and structural sketches.  Students will be exposed to industry-related problems while being provided extensive experience involving the most recent software programs and equipment.  Emphasis will be on the development of skills and knowledge essential for employment as a CADD designer/draftsperson.

Architecture and Engineering Design II:

PDF DocumentArchitecture and Engineering Design II Course Syllabus

1 year – 2 or 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from CADD I and instructor's recommendation.

This course is structured for advanced students who wish to continue to develop their CADD skills in the designated fields of study and also those students involved in a co-op placement. Students have the choice to focus their learning towards a particular field of study (Architecture or Manufacturing) that involves related projects. The following CADD software’s will be reviewed and introduced: AutoCAD, AutoDesk Inventor, Revit, and Solidworks.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Architectural Drafting Skills:
 

  • Elevations
  • Floor plans
  • Model building
  • Open framing models
  • Parametric modeling
  • Rendering
  • Sections – building / roof / wall
  • Site plans

Technical Drafting Skills:
 

  • Additive manufacturing (3D Printing)
  • Assembly drawings
  • Basic drafting fundamentals
  • Exploded-view drawings
  • Parametric modeling
  • Product rendering
  • Sheet metal layout
  • Supplemental view - auxiliary/section

Featured Software:
 

  • AutoCAD
  • AutoDesk Inventor Pro
  • AutoDesk Revit
  • SketchUp Pro
  • Solidworks

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Afina H800 3D printer
  • Dell Precision T1700 workstation
  • HP500 DesignJet large printer
  • HP520 DesignJet large format
  • HP5000GN Laserjet printer

Occupational Options:
 

  • Architectural Draftsman
  • Design Engineer
  • Electrical Schematic Layout
  • Facilities Layout
  • Manufacturing/Tooling
  • Mechanical Draftsman
  • Technical Illustration

Competitions/Organizations:
 

  • MITES (Michigan Industrial Technology Education Society)
  • SkillsUSA

 

Automotive Collision Repair I & II

PDF DocumentAuto Collision Repair Course Syllabus

Auto Collision Repair I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to teach the skills of repairing collision damage to motor vehicles as well as minor restoration and refinishing of completed vehicles. Program activities include learning the arts of metal finishing, sheet metal shrinking, welding, plastic filler application, sheet metal alignment, and refinishing. The student will learn how to use welders, air powered grinders, sanders, polishers, spray guns, and sheet metal pulling devices.

Auto Collision Repair II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Auto Body Repair I and instructor's recommendation.

The second-year program is designed for the advanced student who wishes to gain additional experience in painting and learn the principles of frame and unibody straightening. A limited number of students will be selected by the instructor based on interest and ability.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements. 

Skills Taught:
 

  • Metal finishing
  • Grinding
  • Plastic filler application
  • MIG welding
  • Body panel alignment
  • Body panel replacement
  • Spray painting
  • Buffing and polishing

Specialized Equipment: 
 

  • Hand tools
  • Power tools
  • Spray guns
  • Grinders
  • Polishers
  • Oxyacetylene torches
  • MIG welders
  • Downdraft spray booth
  • Frame equipment
  • Sandblasting equipment
  • Frame machine
  • Unispotter
  • HVLP spray guns
  • Gravity feed spray guns

Occupational Options: 
 

  • Automobile Body Customizer
  • Auto Frame Repairer
  • Air Brush Painter
  • Auto Body Repairer
  • Auto Body Painter
  • Finished Metal Repairer
  • Auto Body Repair Apprentice
  • Automotive Painter Apprentice

 

Automotive Technology I & II

PDF DocumentAutomotive Technology I Course Syllabus

Automotive Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to prepare students for a career in the high demand area of automotive technology. Students learn shop practices, use of tools, shop safety and the use of diagnostic test equipment. Theory and practice are combined to perform basic service in engine repair, engine performance, electrical systems, brake systems, suspension, wheel alignment, steering, air conditioning and light transmission repair. Students will work in a large state-of-the-art, 16 bay service area with up to date service tools.

Automotive Technology II:

PDF DocumentAutomotive Technology II Course Syllabus

1 year - 3 credits

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion of Automotive Technology I or instructor's recommendation.

The student will participate in a dealership-like service program in a large modern shop. The student will diagnose and repair vehicle brake, cooling, steering and suspension, electrical, and engine performance systems. Upon completion of the program, students will be prepared to take and pass the Michigan Mechanics Certification Test.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

All Automotive classes are taught by ASE certified instructors.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Troubleshooting
  • Lubrication
  • Parts ordering
  • Computerized engine control diagnosis
  • Oscilloscope use
  • Engine rebuilding
  • Air conditioning service
  • Wheel alignment
  • Steering and suspension service
  • Light drive train repair
  • Cooling system servicing
  • Electrical system diagnosis
  • Customer Service Skills
  • Brake Diagnosis and repair

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Brake machine center
  • Mitchell information system
  • Hunter wheel alignment machine
  • Vehicle computer scan tools
  • Manufacturer specific training tools
  • Refrigerant recycle system
  • Hunter balance equipment
  • Manufacturer’s Diagnostic Equipment
  • Coolant exchange machine
  • Transmission fluid exchange machine
  • A/C recover and recharge stations
  • RIM clamp tire machines
  • On car brake lathe

Occupational Options:
 

  • Auto Electric Specialist
  • Engine Performance Specialist
  • Engine Rebuilder
  • Air Conditioning Specialist
  • Brake Specialist
  • Suspension Specialist
  • Mechanic’s Assistant
  • General Mechanic
  • Emission Specialist
  • Parts Service Advisor
  • Parts Counter Person

 

Construction Technology I & II

Construction Technology 1

PDF DocumentConstruction Technology I Course Syllabus

CIP 46.0000

Instructor: Adam Gorring
Gorringa@wwcsd.net
734-419-2141

Grading Scale

100%    =   A+
94-99%    =   A
90-93%    =   A-
87-89%    =   B+
84-86%    =   B
80-83%    =   B-
77-79%    =   C+
74-76%    =   C
70-73%    =   C-
67-69%    =   D+
64-66%    =   D
60-63%    =   D-
0-59%    =   E

Grading Outline

35% Employability/Attendance
25% Site/Lab work
20% Algebra
20% Tests

Congratulations on your decision to enroll in Construction Technology 1! Construction is a noble trade affording you a highly competitive wage and the ability to work for yourself. There is great pride in a job well done and we strive to show you how valued these skills are. When someone has a hole in their roof they will call you and pay you fairly for the work you do. This course is unlike most educational experiences you have encountered. We work with our hands, learn real-world skills, and are part of an established network of tradespeople. Welcome to our team.

You will earn your grade based on performance in the grading outline categories. Attendance is critical to your work and employability cannot be measured if you're not here. Embedded math is a key component of this course and, as such, it will be respected. In order to participate in any construction related work, all math assignments must be completed and turned in. Each day you are off the job you are not getting paid therefore you will receive a zero in class.

Point Sheet

Each day you will be actively evaluated in two categories:
 

  1. Employability: 4 points available for display of proper work habits
    Ex: Boots on and tools ready on time, safety glasses on, safe practices
  2. Work: 10 points available for your quality of work
    Ex: Accuracy in work, attention to detail, cleaning up

Student Initials: ________________

Note: A routine day would result in a 4/8. A 10 point day is above and beyond work ethic earned through helping others when ahead, doing advanced projects, taking on extra clean up, among other things.

What We Do

All aspects of framing including floors, walls, staircases, and roof systems are covered.  You will learn to install drywall, siding, shingles, windows, doors, baseboards, electrical, plumbing, and more.  All the while, you are earning your Algebra 2 credit with a hands-on approach.  Next year, build an entire house in Construction Technology 2.

A Day in the Life
 

  • Boots, tool belt, safety glasses and all other course materials are ready approximately 5 minutes after the bell rings
  • Most days there will be a quick recap of material, an introduction of new material, and a demonstration
  • Remainder of time is spent out of your seat, in the shop, working on the assignment
  • Tests and writes on occasion
  • Embedded algebra Monday and Wednesday (8:21-9: 11 am, 12:03-12: 52 pm)
  • Breaks are earned (9:11-9:26am, 12:52-1:07pm). The food line and commons are privileges earned as a class through proper conduct. I reserve the right to refuse breaks at any time for any reason.
  • Each student gets three bathroom passes per semester. Beyond three is an automatic deduction in points. One bathroom pass is issued at a time for the class.

Basic Class Rules
 

  1. Keep hands, feet, and mouth to yourself
  2. Refrain from talking while instructor has the floor
  3. Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated
  4. Give each assignment your full attention and stay on task
  5. Be on time and ready to work
  6. No electronics of any kind

Electronics Continued
 

  1. 1st offense – Verbal warning
  2. 2nd offense- Cell phone is taken and placed in cell block until the end of class, with one-page write explaining the infraction. Also results in the automatic deduction of points.
  3. 3rd offense- Cell phone is taken, placed in cell block until end of class, results in a two page write explaining the infraction. Also results in an automatic deduction of points and a call home.
  4. 4th offense - Cell phone is taken; a one-page write is assigned for you to explain the infraction and your 3 prior offenses. If a situation can’t be resolved, then the matter will result in a meeting with the principal.

Student Initials: ________________

Attendance

***15 minutes late to class is an absence***

Days Absent | (per 6-week marking period / 35% Max) | Grade

0 | 30-35% | = A
1 | 25-29% | = A-
2 | 15-24% | = B
3 | 5-14% | = C
4 | 0-4% | = D to E

 

Note: an absence will automatically be taken at the lowest range. Ex- If you're absent one day, you will be marked at 25% as you are unemployable as a no call/no show. The way to get to the high end of the range is to display the good work habit of calling or e-mailing me in advance. A call from someone other than you gets you no points, but it’s always nice to hear from them.

Student Initials: ________________

Tests and Quizzes

If absent the day of the test, and have called me ahead of time, you are required to take the test the following day. You are responsible for asking me for the test when you return. Failure to call results in a 0 for the test and failure to take the test the following day results in a 0.

Unemployment

If showing habitual unsafe practices and disregard for classroom policies, you will no longer have the privilege of working in the shop environment for the semester. You will collect your work experience from the corresponding chapter in our course textbook.

Segments Covered
 

  • Segment 1:    Safety, Health, and Environmental
  • Segment 2:    Industry Overview
  • Segment 3:    Employability and Technical Skills
  • Segment 4:    Construction Materials
  • Segment 5:    Construction Tools and Equipment
  • Segment 6:    Building Construction Design Blueprint, etc.
  • Segment 7:    Site Preparation and Infrastructure
  • Segment 8:    Common Construction Practices, Concepts, Flooring, Foundations etc.
  • Segment 9:    Residential Construction Techniques (Carpentry)
  • Segment 10:    Green Technology Construction Techniques
  • Segment 11:    Heavy Equipment / Civil Construction Techniques
  • Segment 12:    Construction Business Management

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan.  In order to qualify for college credits, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology.  In addition, you must attend Construction Technology for 2 years.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

I have read and understood the classroom policies for Construction Technology 1. Please sign and date below and return to the instructor.

Student Signature __________________________

Date ________________

Parent Signature ___________________________

Date ________________


Construction Technology II

PDF DocumentConstruction Technology II Course Syllabus

I. IDENTIFYING INFORMATION

 

Course Name:    Construction Technology II
CIP Number: 46.0000
Course Number: YR2 V0620
Term: Full year program

Course Days and Times:
Monday – Friday
7:25 am – 10:05 am or 11:10 am – 1:50 pm

Prerequisites: Construction Technology I

Instructor: Michael Koelzer
Phone Number: (734) 419-2141
Fax Number: (734) 595-2127
Email: koelzerm@wwcsd.net

Web Site:    www.wwcsd.net

Credit: This class meets either the Senior Year Math Related Credit or The Visual, Performing and Applied Arts Credit requirement for graduation.

This is a one year class.  1.5 credits per semester.

II. TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

 

Textbooks

Title: Carpentry Residential Construction Academy
Publisher:  Thomson Delmar Learning
Required:  Yes

Supplemental Materials

Students must purchase:  Tool belt, framing hammer, cat’s paw, speed square, tape measure, utility knife, chalk line, work boots

Skills USA

Skills USA is a student-led organization.  Students have the option to participate in competitions.

III. COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Construction Technology II (On-Site)

Prerequisite:  Certificate of Completion from Construction Technology I (In-School) and/or instructor’s recommendation.  This is the real deal.  In this program students actually build a residential home from the ground up or completely renovate an existing home.  Students are responsible for every aspect of the construction of this home.  The class is structured so the students are on site every day to develop the skills needed to be effective in any trade associated with construction.  Through the course of the school year, students are trained as estimators and work in every trade that is used to build or renovate a home.  The trades include; rough carpentry, trim carpentry, plumbing, HVAC, electric, drywall, masonry, cement flat-work, roofing, various types of siding and flooring.  After completing this program many students continue their education in construction and take the State of Michigan Residential Contractors Licensing exam.  Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

TECH Prep College Information:

William D. Ford Career Technical Center has articulation agreements with several colleges in Michigan.  In order to qualify for college credits at the colleges listed below, you must maintain a B average in Construction Technology.  In addition, you must be accepted into the college list below and attend Construction Technology for 2 years. Please contact your advisor at the attending college for articulation paperwork.

Ferris State University
Henry Ford Community College
Washtenaw Community College
Wayne County Community College
Davenport University

IV. COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

 

Construction Technology II

 

Segment Q:

The second year of the program is devoted entirely to segment Q.  During this time the students build an entire home from the ground up.  This project is completed in partnership with the City of Westland Community Development department and utilizes federal home funds.

Standards:
 

  1. Safety: Students will earn 10 hour OSHA Safety Card
  2. Foundation: Students will be able to identify parts of a foundation and explain the process of constructing. Students will be able to explain how to make foundation energy efficient.
  3. Floor Framing: Students will be able to interpret blueprints to layout and install entire floor system.
  4. Wall Framing: Students will be able to interpret blueprints to layout and install interior and exterior walls. Students will be able to identify and explain green building techniques used in wall construction.
  5. Roof Framing: Students will be able to interpret truss layout and install entire truss package. Students will be able to build scaffolding and demonstrate safe elevated work practices.
  6. Shingle Installation: Students will be able to install architectural shingles on a roof system, utilizing ice guard, tar paper, ridge vent, step flashing, and valley flashing
  7. Insulation: Students will be able to insulate a home to meet current codes. Students will be able to blow insulation into an attic space to increase R-Value to the current code.
  8. Drywall: Students will be able to hang drywall on walls and ceilings.
  9. Trim/Flooring: Students will be able to hang and trim a pre-hung door, bi-fold door, and pocket door. Students will be able to install baseboard moldings, window sills, aprons, and casing. Students will be able to install kitchen and bath cabinets.
  10. Paint: Students will be able to operate an airless sprayer to spray and back roll walls and ceilings. Students will be able to identify the differences in paint types and sheens.
  11. Siding: Students will be able to install vinyl siding and accessories. Students will be able to bend all aluminum trim coverings with an aluminum brake and install.

V. CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION

 

Grading Policy

 

Grading Framework:

 

33.3%    Tests/Homework 
33.3%    Employability/Leadership
33.3%    Performance

Grade Distribution:

98-100% = A+
94-97%    = A
90-93%     = A-
87-89%     = B+
84-86%     = B
80 –83%     = B-
77-79%     = C+
74-76%     = C
70-73%     = C-
67-69%     = D+
64 -66 %     = D
60 = 63%     = D-
0 – 59         = E

Homework/Paperwork

Homework may be assigned in conjunction with the various stages of construction on the home project.  It will be due upon the assigned due date or the student will not be able to join the team on the construction site.  If a situation arises that the student does not complete his/her assignment he/she will be required to stay at the Center to complete the assigned homework.  There will always be at least a three-day notice before the assignment due date.  The grade reduction for a late assignment is 50 percent.  Work must be completed to receive a grade.

Extra Help

The Instructor will be available for extra help. Feel free to schedule a time that’s convenient for both you and your instructor. This could possibly be before or after school. Test/Quizzes may be read aloud and extended time may be permitted under certain circumstances. Seating arrangements may be adjusted based on student needs.

Employability

Attendance is crucial.  No one can learn how to build a home by not showing up.  Also, the class/building project is based on teamwork and when you’re not present you only hurt the team.

Students are expected to be in class before the class starts 7:25 am and 11:10 am.  This is very important especially since we have to take a bus to the site every day.  If the student is later he/she will miss the bus.  Any student late enough to miss the bus to the job site is considered to be absent for the day and cannot earn points.  School transportation issues will be considered to be exceptions.

Performance

Each day is worth one-fifth of the student’s weekly grade.  This is recorded in the student’s journal, attendance, and Mr. Koelzer’s observations.  After review of the logs and the weekly assessment, the instructor will discuss the weekly grade with the student.  The total worth or each week is figured the same as homework resulting in 33.3% of the semester grade.

Performance and employability measures all skills.  The student must be a team player use proper language, be on time, work steadily and efficiently, respect others and their property etc.

Notes:

Students are expected to call the instructor before class starts if they are going to be absent.  This is professional and helps the instructor prepare for class since there is a lot of teamwork and partnering in the building process.

If is the student’s responsibility to find out what they have missed while absent.

A tardy that is more than 15 minutes is considered an absence.

Certificate of Program Completion

No Certificate of Completion will be issued to anyone with more than 25 absences in the school year.  This includes suspensions but not school related absences.

Work-Based Learning:

Work-based learning is a valuable experience in which every student in Career and Technical Education is required to participate. All students will be given opportunities to attend a minimum of one field experience each school year. Those students who do not attend the scheduled experience(s) will be required to find a site where they will spend a minimum of one class period in a business related to their program of study. The student will be required to get the teacher’s signed permission, the parent/guardian’s signed permission, fill out a training agreement to be signed by the site supervisor, and provide their own transportation to and from the site. Upon completion of the field experience, the student will turn in a question and answer assignment provided by the teacher regarding the experience.

I have read and understand the Construction Technology II Grading Policy

 

Student Signature _____________________________________________

Date ___________________

Student E-mail Address:________________________________________________________

 

Parent/Guardian Signature _____________________________________________

Date ___________________

Parent E-mail Address: _________________________________________________________

 

If you have any questions please contact Mr. Koelzer at 734.419.2100

 

Culinary Arts and Hospitality I & II

Culinary Arts and Hospitality I:

PDF DocumentCulinary Arts and Hospitality Course Syllabus

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program prepares students for occupations in the hospitality industry. Learning includes both classroom and laboratory work. The classroom work is designed to teach basic and advanced techniques and procedures used in commercial food service. The CORE information on travel, tourism and lodging industries is also taught.

The laboratory work is used to teach the functions of the commercial kitchen, short order cooking, and dining room service. The labs are divided into workstations. The students will operate many pieces of equipment including convection ovens, slicers, fryers, and griddles, as well as a touchscreen POS dining room system. They will prepare food for the Cafe’ Marquette, a public restaurant and The Food Shop, a student restaurant.

Culinary Arts and Hospitality II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion of Culinary Arts and Hospitality I and instructor's recommendation.

This program offers the student an opportunity to improve performance objectives, specialize in specific advanced skill areas and gain limited management experience.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught: 
 

  • Foodservice safety
  • Sanitation and food-borne illnesses
  • Tools and equipment utilization
  • Measures and portion control
  • Terminology/ingredient identification
  • Standardized recipes
  • Pantry functions
  • Hot food functions/buffet
  • Bakeshop functions
  • Short order cooking
  • Garde Manger
  • Ice carving
  • Gourmet/classical/international cookery
  • Advanced cake decorating

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Convection oven
  • Deck Oven
  • Food processor
  • Broiler/griddle/fryer
  • Pressure fryer/steamer
  • Slicer
  • Automatic dish machine
  • Dutchess dough cutter
  • Sheeter
  • Meat grinder
  • Touchscreen
  • POS restaurant system
  • Dell Pentium computers
  • Rack Oven
  • Dough Mixers

Occupational Options:
 

  • Foods/Cook
  • Short Order Cook
  • Pantry Goods Maker
  • Pastry Helper
  • Cook Helper
  • Waiter/Waitress
  • Cashier
  • Dining Room Attendant
  • Kitchen Helper
  • Baker Helper
  • Lodging
  • Travel/Tourism

 

Digital Art and Design I & II

PDF DocumentDigital Art and Design Course Syllabus

Digital Art and Design I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Graphic Design I offers a comprehensive introduction to the world of graphic design. Age-old concepts such as type, image, color, and composition are integrated with modern technology to introduce graphic design as a form of visual communication. While no pre-requisites are required to enroll in Graphic Design I, it is recommended that students have an interest in the visual arts. Art majors are seriously encouraged. Students should also enjoy completing the majority of their work on a computer. The graphic design department operates a complete working shop, allowing students a vast amount of hands-on experience. Our lab is a state-of-the-art facility that rivals many post-secondary classrooms.

Digital Art and Design II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Graphic Design I and instructor's recommendation.

With basic training in the art of graphic design completed, students in Graphic Design II focus on the mastery of design and graphics technology.  In addition, this course emphasizes competitions, scholarships, portfolios, and self-promotion to prepare students for post-secondary education or careers in the field.  All second-year students will have a professional portfolio upon successful completion of the course.  Students are encouraged to participate in competitions that offer scholarships and awards.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Software:
 

  • Adobe Acrobat CC
  • Adobe Photoshop CC
  • Adobe Illustrator CC
  • Adobe InDesign CC
  • Adobe Animate CC
  • Adobe Bridge
  • Cut Studio-Vinyl Sign

Special Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Large format printers
  • Roland cutter/plotters    
  • Medium format color laser printers
  • Heat/laminating presses     
  • Six-position screen press
  • Matting and Framing equipment

Occupations:
 

  • Art Director
  • Producer
  • Account Representative
  • Designer:
  • Print, Packaging, Web,
  • Motion Graphics, Signs, and
  • Automotive Graphics
  • Illustrator: Technical, 3D, Character, Comic,
  • Image Manipulation, and Animation
  • Production: Pre-press, Screen Printer, Heat Transfer, and Sign Making

Skills Taught:
 

  • Typography
  • Color theory
  • Traditional illustration    
  • 2D digital illustration/animation
  • 3D digital illustration/animation
  • Photo/image manipulation
  • Print design    
  • Web design and production
  • Interactive design and production
  • Screen printing

 

Digital Media Technology I & II

PDF DocumentDigital Media Technology Course Syllabus

Digital Media Technology I:

1 year – 3 credits

 

Students will investigate the history, technology, and modern day implications of mass media with an emphasis on video production for film, broadcast journalism, and marketing. Students will gain experience in pre-production, production and post-production. Students work with cinema cameras, audio, and lighting equipment. Students learn how to record video, capture audio, build sets, color correct, color grade, equalize audio, sequence shots, schedule shoots, create special effects, produce music for film soundtracks/scores, and scout locations. In addition, students acquire the following skills: script writing, storyboarding, and acting for the camera.

Digital Media Technology II:

1 year – 3 credits

 

Prerequisite:  Certificate of Completion from Digital Media Technology I and instructor’s recommendation.

This course is a continuation of Digital Media Technology I, and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to work on independent study projects facilitated by the instructor. Students focus on compiling finished polished projects for a professional portfolio. Students also have the opportunity to work on competitions for scholarships, film festival projects, district-wide media projects and client projects.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Lighting
  • Camera operation
  • Editing video/photography
  • Producing
  • Directing
  • Acting
  • Script writing
  • Storyboarding
  • Motion graphics
  • Special effects
  • Sound editing
  • Sound capture
  • Color correction/color grading
  • Portfolio preparation

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Mac Pro
  • Canon D-SLR cameras
  • Rokinon cinema lenses
  • Sigma art lenses
  • Electronic strobe kits
  • Audio production studio
  • Audio mixers/mics
  • Industry standard lighting equipment
  • Two film studios
  • Green/blue screens
  • Professional camera stabilizers
  • Adobe Premiere Pro CC
  • Adobe After Effects CC
  • Adobe Photoshop CC
  • Adobe Lightroom CC
  • Adobe Audition CC
  • Ableton
  • Garage Band
  • Celtx
  • Google Docs

Occupational Options:
 

  • Director
  • Producer
  • Cinematographer
  • Video Editor
  • Actor
  • Gaffer
  • Art Director
  • Storyboard Artist
  • Sound Designer
  • Music Supervisor
  • Sound Editor
  • Makeup Artist
  • Costume Designer
  • Reporter
  • Colorist
  • Animator
  • Videographer

Electronics/Robotics Technology I & II

PDF DocumentElectronics / Robotics Course Syllabus

Electronics/Robotics Technology I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement. This program will introduce and develop electronic technology skills necessary to succeed in this highly technical world. Through extensive hands-on experiences, basic concepts will be taught, building a solid foundation of knowledge. Troubleshooting areas are taught in conjunction with the proper use of various test equipment such as the volt-ohmmeter, digital multi-meter, signal generator and oscilloscope. The high school students will also build their own robotics and compete regionally with other schools. Students complete projects and demonstrate their skills and abilities on an ongoing basis throughout the course.

Electronics/Robotics Technology II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Electronics/Robotics Technology I and instructor's recommendation.

The second year of this program takes students deeper into electronics technology theory through the study of the principles of semiconductor technology. In addition to theory and concepts, students take part in hands-on laboratory projects throughout the course. These laboratory projects simulate real-world problems providing students with the optimum foundation of skills necessary to be competitive in today’s job market.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Binary/decimal number conversions
  • Identification of major components used in digital circuits
  • Introduction to programming, microprocessors, interfacing, and communications
  • Basic AC/DC circuit analysis
  • PC board layout/wire wrapping
  • Troubleshooting/problem-solving techniques
  • PC use/interface
  • Basic Robotics

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Computer-assisted AC and DC experimenters
  • Computer-assisted digital experimenter
  • AC/DC motor control trainer
  • Sequential logic pneumatic trainer
  • Pick and Place Robot
  • Digital trainer
  • Dual trace scopes/VOM multimeters
  • Function generators/digital counters

Occupational Options:
 

  • Electronics Mechanic Apprentice
  • Customer Engineering Specialist
  • Field Service Engineer
  • Electronics Tester/Assembler
  • Electronic Office Machine Repair
  • Technician
  • Electro/Mechanical Technician
  • Prototype Technician
  • Computer Repair Technician
  • Robotics Repair Technician

 

Emergency Medical Technician

Emergency Medical Technician:

PDF DocumentEMT Course Syllabus

1 year – 2 or 3 credits
 

This course is offered to senior students only.

Students must be 18 years old within one year of course completion to be eligible to take the National Registry EMT B-Exam. Students must pass the class with 80% or higher to be eligible to take the National Registry EMT written and practical skills exams.  Students will be required to complete a minimum of 36 clinical experience hours, 24 hours with an EMS provider in an ambulance and 16 hours in an emergency room at a local hospital. These clinics will be scheduled through the Career-Technical Center.  Upon passing the EMT B-Exam, the student is eligible to continue their studies to be a paramedic.  Students are required to have the Hepatitis B series vaccination and a current TB test. It is recommended that students have no major health problems and that they be able to lift 100 pounds.

Experience:

Students will be required to complete a minimum of 36 clinical experience hours scheduled through William D. Ford Career-Technical Center; 24 hours with an EMS provider in an ambulance and 16 hours in an emergency room at the hospital.

Skills Taught:
 

  • CPR for adults, children, and infants
  • (AHA Healthcare Provider card issued)
  • AED
  • Administer oxygen
  • Take vital signs
  • Splint fractures
  • Control bleeding
  • Immobilize patients with suspected spinal or other serious injuries
  • Deal with psychological emergencies
  • Deal with pediatric emergencies
  • Childbirth
  • Treat burns
  • Treat patients involved in accidents

Occupational Options:
 

  • Fire Fighting
  • Law Enforcement
  • Paramedic
  • Nursing
  • Medical Care
  • Industrial Safety

Firefighter

Firefighter

PDF DocumentFirefighting Course Syllabus

1 year – 3 credits

 

This course is designed for students who are interested in firefighting and related careers.  This course will prepare students for attendance at a fire academy. Academic and practical skills will be patterned after the guidelines of the Michigan Firefighter Training Council, giving students a comprehensive preview of academy objectives.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Safety
  • Team Building
  • Communication Skills
  • Report Writing
  • Fire Behavior
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Extinguishers, Ropes, and Knots
  • Rescue and Extrication
  • Forcible Entry
  • Ground Ladders
  • Ventilation
  • Water Supply
  • Hose, Fire Streams
  • Fire Control
  • Alarms, Suppression and Detection Systems
  • Loss Control, Evidence Preservation
  • Communications
  • First Aid Certification
  • CPR Certification
  • AED Certification
  • Hazardous Materials
  • Fire Prevention and Public Education
  • Company and Individual Drills

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Provided by Michigan Academy of Emergency Services:
  • Boardman 1500 GPM Fire Engine
  • Ford Class B Ambulance/Rescue Vehicle
  • FRS Radios for Communication Skills
  • SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)
  • Level A, B, and C Hazardous Material Protective Suits
  • Basic Medical Equipment
  • Vehicle Extrication Equipment (Jaws of Life)
  • A, B, C, and D Fire Extinguishers
  • Cotton and Rubber Jacketed Fire Hose
  • Static Climbing Rope
  • Rose Safety Harness (Fall Protection)
  • Fire Service Hand Tools
  • “Halligan” Tool
  • Axe
  • Pry Bar
  • Sledge

Occupational Options:
 

  • Firefighter
  • Public Fire and Life Safety Educator
  • Fire Protection Engineer/Specialist
  • Fire Department Health and Safety Officer
  • Fire Department Incident Safety Officer
  • Paramedic
  • EMT
  • Industrial Safety

Uniform Dress:
 

  • Navy Cargo Pants
  • Uniform Polo Shirt
  • Black Belt
  • Black Work Boots

 

Game Design & Programming I & II

PDF DocumentGame Design Course Syllabus

Game Design and Programming I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This course introduces students to computer programming through game design. It is intended for students who want to pursue a career in an information technology field such as computer science, engineering, software development, or consulting. Students create and test a variety of games and then develop enhancements for them.

Primary tools include JavaScript and Game Maker. Students learn and practice a range of skills utilizing: functions, arrays, loops, random numbers, inheritance, sprites, animation, sound editing, parallax motion, and game physics. Progress from being just a game player to a game designer.

Game Design and Programming II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Game Design and Programming I and instructor’s recommendation.

The primary focus of this course is to extend the skill-set from Year 1. Students will conduct research on the leading mobile operating systems, such as iOS and Android and research current trends in User Interface (UI) design. Students learn about and develop apps that can be used on a variety of different devices. Students evaluate the costs and benefits of "native" app development with developing web apps. Explore the latest games, platforms, and technologies, including prototypes, featured on crowdfunding sites.

By developing code for mobile and wearable computers, students transition from knowing "there's an app for that", to stating: "I made an app for that."

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught: 
 

  • Computer Programming
  • Coding in: JavaScript, Python, GML
  • Introduction to SQL, XML, JSON
  • Problem Solving & Debugging
  • Producing and Editing Audio
  • Game Level Design
  • Using Code Libraries and APIs
  • Tools & Techniques for Group Development
  • Survey Design & Data Analysis
  • 3D Model & STL Creation 
  • Presentation & Communication Skills
  • Portfolio Development

Specialized Equipment and Materials:
 

  • Modern, networked PCs
  • Online course materials & course calendar
  • Screen Recording Software
  • Audio Editing Software
  • Game systems (modern and classic)
  • HTC Vive Virtual Reality hardware
  • Multiple 3D Printers
  • Raspberry Pi Linux Computers
  • Android, iOS, and Surface Tablets

Occupational Options: 
 

  • Game Designer
  • Software Developer
  • App Developer (web and native apps)
  • Help Desk Support Specialist
  • Database Administrator
  • Software Engineer
  • Web Developer
  • Entrepreneur

Sample Projects:
 

  • Mini Text Adventure Game
  • Fishpond (platformer)
  • Zool (arcade style)
  • Classic game re-makes
  • Copyright & Creative Commons
  • Raspberry Pi Zero Cases 
  • Student Portfolios

 

Graphic Design and Print I & II

PDF DocumentGraphic Design and Print I & II Course Syllabus

Graphic Design and Print I & II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Students are exposed to all aspects of the graphics industry. Emphasis is placed on computer design, color, typography, composition, preflighting, and apparel preparation and production. Students will be exposed to computer-to-plate imaging, operating offset presses, bindery and finishing equipment. Printing methods include; offset, digital, dye-sublimation, vinyl sign making, and thermal apparel. Students design and print their own logos, business cards, greeting cards, stationery, flyers, coffee mugs, key chains, hoodies, and T-shirts. First-year students work with advanced students and can excel in the customer production area.

Graphic Design and Print II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Printing Technology I and instructor's recommendation.

Advanced students are in charge of running a printing business within the classroom. They work with customers, fill out work orders, produce real printed jobs, learn estimating, inventory, basic equipment maintenance. Students will be expected to take a leadership role in the program. Students rotate where needed to complete jobs, but may choose to spend most of their time specializing in one department to advance their skill level for employment.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Industry safety standards
  • Printers measurements
  • Graphic/printing terminology
  • Typography
  • Designing page layouts
  • Preflighting
  • File management
  • Basic computer troubleshooting
  • Computer-to-plate imaging
  • Spot, process and Pantone colors
  • Operating offset presses
  • Troubleshooting
  • Bindery and finishing operations
  • Copyright/ethics
  • Dye sublimation printing
  • Design and production of apparel art
  • Sign making
  • Employability

Promotional Equipment:
 

  • Hotronix Heat press
  • Knight K-3 Ceramic mug press
  • Roland Camm-1 Servo vinyl cutter

Prepress Software/Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Adobe InDesign CC
  • Adobe Photoshop CC
  • Adobe Illustrator CC
  • Adobe Acrobat CC
  • Cut-Studio-Vinyl Sign
  • Scanners
  • Digital cameras

Press/Finishing Equipment:
 

  • Heidelberg QM 46-2
  • Standard Horizon 16 bin Collator- air/vacuum/stitcher/folder/face trim
  • Challenge 30” paper cutter
  • Challenge drill
  • Interlake stitcher
  • Baum ultra-folder
  • Shrink wrapper

Occupational Options:
 

  • Graphic Designer
  • Electronic Publisher/Page Layout Artist
  • Digital Imaging Specialist
  • Electronic Prepress/Preflight Operator
  • Press Operator/Press Assistant
  • Material Handler
  • Shipping and Distribution Manager
  • Bindery and Finishing Operator
  • Screen Printer
  • Vinyl Sign Maker
  • Quality Control Specialist
  • Customer Service Representative
  • Graphic/Printing Sales Representative
  • Owner/Entrepreneur
  • Plant Manager
  • Mechanic Technician
  • Paper Scientist
  • Bindery Technician

 

Health Occupations I & II

Health Occupations I:

PDF DocumentHealth Occupations I Course Syllabus

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to provide students with a better understanding of and appreciation for the healthcare field. This program will provide the skills necessary to give basic bedside care to patients. Students will be exposed to a variety of careers within the healthcare system. Students are also provided with a “hands-on” experience during the mandatory clinical experience.

Students are required to have a uniform, a current physical examination, tuberculin test and Hepatitis B vaccine. An influenza vaccine is strongly recommended.

Health Occupations II:

PDF DocumentHealth Occupations II Course Syllabus

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Health Occupations I and instructor's recommendation.

This program provides the student who is interested in preparing for a career in nursing, or other patient care areas, a greater opportunity for increasing skills and comfort with patient care. A uniform, physical exam, tuberculin test and Hepatitis B vaccine are required for both programs. In addition, HO2 students are required to have a urine drug screen.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements. Students who successfully complete the program and state examinations will be certified by the state as a Nursing Assistant. Qualified students may have an opportunity for extended clinical experience.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Infection control
  • Medical terminology + abbreviations
  • Anatomy and physiology – 12 Systems
  • CNA Program
  • AHA First Aid
  • Observations and communication skills
  • Vital signs
  • Moving, lifting, positioning patients
  • AHA BLS f Rehabilitation techniques
  • Ethics and legal responsibilities
  • Isolation techniques
  • Stress management
  • Glucometers, lab draw
  • Catheterization,
  • Oral Suction, Tracheostomy Care
  • Wound Dressing Techniques
  • Sterilization
  • Advanced patient care skills
  • Sterile gloves
  • Pediatrics
  • Obstetrics

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Sphygmomanometers/stethoscopes
  • Hoyer lift/ambulation aids
  • Hospital beds
  • Patient care equipment
  • Paraffin baths
  • CPR mannequins

Occupational Options:
 

  • Dietary Aide
  • Physical Therapy Aide
  • Occupational Therapy Aide
  • Nurses Assistant
  • Home Health Aide (advanced)
  • Veterinary Assistant (advanced)
  • Lab Assistant
  • Unit Clerk

Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration (HVAC) I & II

PDF DocumentHVAC and Refrigeration Course Syllabus

Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program teaches students diagnosis, maintenance, installation and repair of residential and commercial heating and air conditioning systems. Students will learn safety, basic electricity, electronics, refrigeration, air conditioning/ventilation and the use of test equipment for installation and troubleshooting. Students also learn wiring diagrams, controls, and tools. Frequent lab work allows students to apply skills learned in class to real equipment. The curriculum also allows students to use electronic and digital controls for managing energy systems found in large office and industrial buildings.

Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Heating / Air Conditioning / Refrigeration I and instructor's recommendation.

Students will specialize in solid-state controls with state-of-the-art equipment. They will design, build and install HVAC units. Students will also design and fabricate sheet metal ductwork for their systems in the lab. Students will learn to solder and braze pipe and cut and thread gas pipe. Preparation for E.P.A. license exam is also included.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Basic wiring
  • Schematic identification
  • Sheet metal fabrication/installation
  • Heating/cooling fundamentals
  • Identification/troubleshooting of domestic/commercial heating and cooling systems
  • Pipe cutting, threading, reaming
  • Identification/servicing of hot water heating systems
  • Estimation of heating/cooling leads
  • Boca codes
  • Solid State circuits

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Forced air/hydronic heating trainer
  • Refrigeration system trainers
  • Portable charging and testing units
  • Compressors and vacuum pumps
  • Residential air conditioners
  • Gas and electric furnaces
  • Specialized furnace test equipment
  • Oxyacetylene brazing/welding
  • Heat pumps
  • Electronic ignitions trainers

Occupational Options:
 

  • Oil Burner Service
  • Pipe Cutter
  • Furnace Installer
  • Air Conditioning Installer
  • Sheet Metal Worker
  • Air Conditioning Window Repairer
  • Refrigeration Mechanic
  • Refrigeration Mechanic Assistant
  • Air Conditioning Installer Assistant
  • Heating/Air Conditioning Installer
  • Facilities Maintenance Engineer


 

Media Production I & II

PDF DocumentMedia Production Course Syllabus

Media Production I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

In this program, students are introduced to the world of Graphic Communications with a heavy emphasis on Digital Photography. Students will explore portraiture, commercial photography, photojournalism, and photo restoration. Other instruction will include basic fundamentals in the areas of graphic design, digital illustration, advertising, motion graphics, web design, and video. We will utilize many programs offered in the Adobe Creative Cloud such as Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Muse, Premiere, After Effects, Bridge, and more.

Media Production II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Media Production I and instructor’s recommendation.

Students will explore advanced techniques in Digital Photography, and designate a specialization in at least one of the following; Graphic Design, Commercial Photography/Design, Motion Graphics, or Photojournalism. Projects will be complex and require some self-direction.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • DSLR camera fundamentals
  • Lens care and mounting
  • Determining proper exposure
  • Camera RAW editing
  • Studio lighting
  • Basic photo printing techniques
  • Photo restoration
  • Food/beverage styling
  • Model direction
  • Sports photography
  • Animation/motion graphics
  • Basic video editing
  • Budgeting
  • Portfolio preparation
  • Image manipulation/digital art

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Macintosh computers
  • Adobe InDesign CC (software)
  • Adobe Photoshop CC (software)
  • Adobe Illustrator CC (software)
  • Strobe Studio Lighting
  • DSLR cameras (Canon and Sony)
  • Portable lighting
  • Go Pro cameras
  • Array of lenses
  • Canon Pixma Pro-10 photo printers
  • Wacom Tablets

Occupational Options:
 

  • Apprentice Photographer
  • Commercial Photographer
  • Portrait Photographer
  • Sports Photographer
  • Photo Journalist
  • Retoucher
  • Film/Video Editor
  • Animator
  • Photo Restoration
  • Graphic Artist
  • Digital Illustration

Medical Assisting I & II

PDF DocumentMedical Assisting Course Syllabus

Medical Assisting I:

1 year – 3 credits

 

This program is an instructional program which focuses on the skills needed to be employed in an outpatient medical facility. Both administrative and clinical skills will be covered. Administrative skills include computer applications, telephone communications, patient accounting, insurance billing, appointment scheduling and medical office management. Clinical skills include ECG, phlebotomy, medication administration, injections, vital signs, sterile technique and laboratory procedures. Anatomy, medical terminology, and certification in CPR/First Aid are also covered in depth.

Students will be required to purchase a uniform for this program.

Medical Assisting II:

1 year – 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Medical Assisting I and instructor’s recommendation.

Students will continue to improve competencies in specialized areas and advance clinical skills. A requirement of this program is a mandatory, unpaid clinical experience in a medical office/clinic or hospital facility. Students will focus on medical transcription, phlebotomy, anatomy, medical terminology and medical office management.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Bookkeeping (pegboard system)
  • Insurance billing
  • Medical transcription and terminology
  • Medication administration
  • Injections
  • Venipuncture
  • Routine laboratory tests
  • Vital signs
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Assisting with in-office surgery
  • Finger puncture
  • First aid
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Telephone communications
  • Scheduling appointments
  • Professional ethics
  • Taking patient’s medical history
  • Specimen collection
  • Medical Office Administration
  • Anatomy

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Electrocardiography machine
  • Sphygmomanometer
  • Centrifuge
  • Autoclave
  • Computers/various software
  • Surgical instruments
  • Needles and syringes
  • Microscope
  • Spirometer
  • Doppler
  • Transcription
  • Pulse OX
  • Audiometer
  • Ear irrigation
  • Optec and Titmus vision testers
  • Clinitex 50

Occupational Options:
 

  • Medical Office Administrator
  • Medical Assistant
  • Insurance Biller
  • Phlebotomist
  • Unit Clerk
  • Medical Receptionist/Secretary
  • Medical Transcriber
  • ECG Technician
  • Lab Assistant
  • Pharmacy Clerk
  • Dental Receptionist
  • Dental Office Aide

Sports Conditioning & Exercise Science

Sports Conditioning & Exercise Science

PDF DocumentSports Conditioning & Exercise Science Course Syllabus

Students enrolled in the Sports Conditioning & Exercise Science Program will cover topics that include Human Anatomy & Physiology, Human Movement/ Kinesiology, Nutrition & Weight Management, Bioenergetics, CPR/First Aid/AED certification, Exercise & Fitness screening, Exercise Prescription, and Exercise Program Development. This course will prepare students for entry level positions in the fitness industry.

This new CTE course will also provide students with a foundation to pursue post-secondary degrees and professional certifications in the athletic and health-related fields. The course will explore the science of human health through designing a systematic approach to exercise and conditioning. Students will learn the parameters of fitness training including: resistance training, body fat and weight loss, nutrition, flexibility, agility, and more. Exercise Science students will be able to design, implement, modify, track and update personal fitness training programs based on individual needs.

Teacher Cadet I & II

PDF DocumentTeacher Cadet I & II Course Syllabus

Teacher Cadet I:

1 year - 3 credits

 

This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the field of early childhood education as well as provide an understanding and appreciation of all young children. Students study growth and development of 3-5-year-olds as well as elementary age, learn how to plan developmentally appropriate activities for children, study behavior, and behavior management, and learn other work-related skills. The students participate three days a week as classroom assistants in our State Licensed, Sunshine and Rainbows Preschool. The students are active leaders, learning techniques of teamwork, leadership, and participation. Career exploration and employment opportunities are also studied as part of the core curriculum. Two work experiences are implemented during the year to provide students with insights about working in the “Real World”.

Teacher Cadet II:

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Early Childhood/Teacher Education I and Instructor’s recommendation.

Students continue their study in growth and development including infant through school age. The students in Early Childhood/Teacher Education II act as team leaders to the first year students. The students participate three days a week as classroom assistants and activity leaders in the on-site lab. Two or more work experiences are implemented during the year as well as having the opportunity to work in the co-op program.

The students in both programs also work on a job-related portfolio detailing the experiences and accomplishments in Early Childhood/Teacher Education. Additional experiences may include Co-op, internships and SkillsUSA.

A student who successfully completes this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • Lesson planning/preparation
  • Classroom management
  • Guidance techniques
  • Observation/recording/assessing
  • Team skills/cooperation
  • Written/verbal communication skills
  • Nutrition/menu planning

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • Child-sized furniture
  • Developmental learning materials for creativity, intellectual development, social skills, large and fine motor skills, and outdoor play
  • CD’s and CD players
  • Observation booth
  • Outdoor play equipment
  • Full-size kitchen and equipment
  • Computers
  • Projector
  • iPad and speaker/docking station

Occupational Options:
 

  • Early Childhood Teacher
  • Elementary School Teacher
  • Middle School Teacher
  • High School Teacher
  • College/University Faculty
  • Pre-Primary Impaired Teacher
  • Special Education Teacher
  • School Administrator
  • Religious Educator
  • Corporate Trainer
  • Speech Therapist
  • School Psychologist
  • School Social Worker
  • School Nurse
  • School Counselor
  • Occupational Therapist

 

Welding Technology I & II

Welding Technology I:

PDF DocumentWelding Technology I Course Syllabus

1 year - 3 credits

 

Successful completion of this class will fulfill the Algebra II graduation requirement. The program is designed to prepare students for entry-level welding occupations. Students learn basic and advanced techniques in oxyacetylene, gas metal, shielded metal, and tungsten arc welding processes. Fabrication, brazing, cutting of metal products and blueprint reading are also taught. Proper workplace attitudes and behaviors are also practiced.

Welding Technology II:

PDF DocumentWelding Technology II Course Syllabus

1 year - 3 credits

 

Prerequisite: Certificate of Completion from Welding Technology I and instructor's recommendation

Second-year students are expected to take a leadership role among his/her peers while improving/completing performance objectives on all equipment and all of the welding processes. Second-year students will learn all position welding, fabrication, and job welding. First and second-year high school students will be involved in welding competitions with students from other schools. Competitions may lead to awards, prizes, certificates and/or employment.

Students who successfully complete this program may earn college credits through articulation agreements.

Skills Taught:
 

  • SMAW welding
  • OAW welding
  • GMAW welding
  • GTAW welding
  • Shop welding
  • Shop safety
  • Brazing and cutting
  • Blueprint reading
  • Fabrication
  • Workplace skills
  • Teamwork
  • Welding Math and Science
  • Algebra II
  • Plasma cutting
  • Arc Gouging
  • Flux Core welding
  • Measurement

Specialized Equipment:
 

  • SMAW arc welders
  • GMAW welders
  • GTAW welders
  • Pipe beveling
  • Brazing equipment
  • Iron crafter
  • Grinders (bench and pedestal)
  • Band saws (horizontal and vertical)
  • Shears
  • Plasma cutting system
  • Mill drill press
  • Robot automation
  • Spot welder
  • Inverters
  • OAW cutting system
  • Sandblast
  • Abrasive cut off saw

Occupational Options:
 

  • Combination Welder
  • Production Welder
  • Gas Welder/Cutter
  • SMAW Arc Welder
  • Fabricator
  • Welder/Fitter
  • Layout/Welder
  • Mechanic/Welder
  • Welding Engineer
  • Teacher
  • Metallurgy
  • Welding Instructor
  • Welding Sales
  • Welding Supervisor
  • Welding Inspector
  • Pipe Welder
  • Iron Worker
  • Boilermaker

 

Locations

All courses except CADD & Early Childhood/Teacher Education are offered at:

William D. Ford Career-Technical Center
36455 Marquette
Westland, Michigan 48185
Phone: 734-419-2100
Fax: 734-595-2127

Location for CADD

Wayne Memorial High School
3001 Fourth Street
Wayne, Michigan 48184
Phone: 734-419-2200
Fax: 734-595-2227

Location for Early Childhood/Teacher Education

Wayne-Westland Community Schools Educational Complex
36745 Marquette
Westland, MI 48185
Phone: 734-419-2000
Fax: 734-595-2123